Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Revista Brasileira de Política Internacional]]> http://www.scielo.br/rss.php?pid=0034-732920180002&lang=en vol. 61 num. 2 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.br/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.br <![CDATA[Technology, politics, and development: domestic criticism of the 1975 Brazilian-West German nuclear agreement]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292018000200201&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Abstract The article analyzes the domestic debate regarding the Brazil-West Germany nuclear agreement of 1975. A number of scientists and opposition politicians sought to use the apparent failings of the agreement to critique the military’s claims regarding the deal’s contribution to Brazilian economic development and nuclear status. While limited in its immediate impact, the opposition outlined major themes that would come to the fore later in the decade as Brazilian society began to question the wisdom of the agreement. Concerned with asserting Brazil’s nuclear autonomy, the opposition’s efforts also add a new dimension to global narratives of nuclear protest. <![CDATA[A pericentric Punta del Este: Cuba’s failed attempt to join the Latin American Free Trade Area (LAFTA) and the limits of Brazil’s independent foreign policy]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292018000200202&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Abstract This article analyzes a crucial but still neglected episode in Latin America’s Cold War: the mobilization of regional anti-Communist governments to oppose Cuba’s attempt to join the Latin American Free Trade Area (LAFTA) in August 1962. We focus particularly on the forces that shaped Brazil’s position, which initially supported Cuba, but eventually changed course. <![CDATA[Globalizing the Latin American legal field: continental and regional approaches to the international legal order in Latin America]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292018000200203&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Abstract Through an analysis of the international legal thought of Alejandro Alvarez, Ruy Barbosa, Isidro Fabela and Carlos Saavedra Lamas, this paper shows that Latin America played a vital and complex role in the reconfiguration of a new global legal order in the early twentieth century and the consolidation of the modern discipline of international law, as well as a specific legal field in Latin America. It argues that the region was a pioneer in the promotion of distinctive continental and regional approaches to international law and world peace before and after the creation of the League of Nations. <![CDATA[The forbidden cooperation: South Africa–Brazil nuclear relations at the turn of the 1970s]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292018000200204&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Abstract Contributing to a global nuclear history, this article discusses Brazil’s refusal to accept sensitive nuclear assistance from South Africa in the late 1970s. Relying on primary sources and oral history interviews, this study argues that despite their similar positions in the global nuclear order, Brazil’s decision was connected to political and technological reasons. <![CDATA[The impact of the 1949 Chinese Revolution on a Latin American Chinese community: shifting power relations in Havana’s Chinatown]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292018000200205&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Abstract This article argues that, while initially constrained by U.S. Cold War policies both in the Americas and in Asia, China’s 1949 Communist Revolution could finally have a transformative impact on Latin American Chinese overseas community after the Cuban Revolution opened up new avenues for socialist influence in Latin America. By using new archival sources and interviews, we will analyze this changing impact by highlighting the intertwined layers of shifting power structures with a specific focus on the Chinese community in Cuba. <![CDATA[The challenge from the periphery: Latin America’s New Deals and the shaping of Liberal Internationalism in FDR’s Era]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292018000200206&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Abstract FDR’s policies, in particular the New Deal, became a sort of global brand, and created a transnational space of discussion. Many in the periphery, in particular in Latin America, appropriated the notion and labeled their own proposals as their own New Deals. These proposals produced an alternative international cooperative order, not necessarily the one wished by American elites. Latin America’s appropriation and reinterpretation of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s message stirred controversies and disputes in the United States, within the liberal internationalist sectors, both in political positions and private actors. This article explores the reaction of certain U.S. liberal elites to the way Latin Americans appropriated and shaped international Rooseveltian ideas. It argues that some American internationalist elites feared that the way in which Latin Americans understood the New Deal and the Good Neighbor Policy might push development ideas abroad beyond the pale, as it might encourage the more radical stance of FDR administration at home, and it might jeopardize an American-led reorganization of the international order. <![CDATA[“Pax Americana”: the United States and the transformation of the 20th century’s global order]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292018000200208&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Abstract This article seeks to re-appraise the transformation of America’s international role and its influence on the transformation of the 20th century’s global order. It focuses on a re-appraisal of US aspirations to construct a “Pax Americana” and their impact on an unprecedented peace system that was first conceptualised after 1918 but only consolidated after 1945: the cold war’s transatlantic peace order. Yet my analysis also highlights important distinctions between American conceptions and behaviour vis-à-vis Europe and the superpower’s more hierarchical and often neo-imperialist approaches to “global order” and other regions during the cold war, including East Asia and Latin America. <![CDATA[A hemispheric moral majority: Brazil and the transnational construction of the New Right]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292018000200209&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Abstract This essay posits Brazil as one critical locus for gestating the New Right. Often conceived of as a conservative reaction to the U.S. Civil Rights movement, the New Right actually developed transnationally, with determinative participation from Brazilian activists. In this article, I focus on a revelatory subset of those activists, who demonstrate collaboration that (1) linked elite reactionaries in Brazil, the United States, and elsewhere; (2) facilitated the rise of conservative Christianity as populist groundswell; and (3) transformed these two countries into power centers of a Right that adheres to the now-familiar Brazilian moniker “Bible, Bullets, and Beef.” <![CDATA[Thinking about complexity: the displacement of power along time and through space]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292018000200300&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Abstract This essay posits Brazil as one critical locus for gestating the New Right. Often conceived of as a conservative reaction to the U.S. Civil Rights movement, the New Right actually developed transnationally, with determinative participation from Brazilian activists. In this article, I focus on a revelatory subset of those activists, who demonstrate collaboration that (1) linked elite reactionaries in Brazil, the United States, and elsewhere; (2) facilitated the rise of conservative Christianity as populist groundswell; and (3) transformed these two countries into power centers of a Right that adheres to the now-familiar Brazilian moniker “Bible, Bullets, and Beef.”