Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Revista Brasileira de Política Internacional]]> http://www.scielo.br/rss.php?pid=0034-732920170002&lang=pt vol. 60 num. 2 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.br/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.br <![CDATA[Brazilian Hybrid Security in South America]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292017000200201&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Abstract Existing research on security governance in South America functions on dichotomous lines. Analysis of Brazil’s security practices is a case in point. On the one hand, scholars point out the balance of power and hegemonic institutions as the main discourse in the security practices between Brazil and its South American neighbors. On the other hand, some other emphasize the importance of democracy, cooperation on defense and security, and peaceful conflict resolution between states in the region as indicators for the emergence of a security community between Brazil and its neighbors in the South American region. The way in which multiple orders coexist is not given adequate attention in empirical research. This article seeks to overcome this dichotomy. By foregrounding Brazil’s regional security practices, particularly during the Lula and Rousseff administration, I show the hybrid and sometimes ambivalent security governance system in Brazil, where mechanisms of balance of power and security community overlap in important ways. <![CDATA[Brazil’s Nuclear Submarine: A Broader Approach to the Safeguards Issue]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292017000200202&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Abstract The article discusses the issue of nuclear-propelled submarines as a nuclear non-proliferation question, addresses the issue of safeguards procedures and arrangements, and suggests a broader, political approach to allay international concerns. Such safeguards arrangement would set the precedent for future arrangements, and particularly if integrated into a more comprehensive approach, might strengthen Brazil’s hand in nuclear negotiations, including on disarmament. <![CDATA[The South American Defense Council: the Building of a Community of Practice for Regional Defense]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292017000200204&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Abstract While the South American Defense Council has been analyzed as a security community, we argue that it is best described as an early stage community of practice, since it has successfully set in motion a regular interaction dynamic between numerous defense actors, as we demonstrate with concrete examples. We further discuss political support as a prerequisite for regional defense identity. <![CDATA[Grand Strategy and Peace Operations: the Brazilian Case]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292017000200205&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Abstract This article aims to contribute to the analysis of Brazilian grand strategy and the place of UN peace operations (POs) in the context of this strategy. It deals with the political economy of POs and grapples with the trends of POs in the recent past, especially the increasingly robust mandates of peace operations and their implications. Brazilian participation in peace operations is discussed, focusing on its main characteristics and the consequences of an absence of consensus on the role of POs for the country´s grand strategy. Finally, suggestions are proposed that might create synergies between participation in POs and Brazil´s grand strategy. <![CDATA[The Brazilian Engagement with Peace Operations: a Critical Analysis]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292017000200206&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Abstract It is clear that Brazil seeks to enhance its international standing through an increasing engagement with peace operations. This paper argues that the more Brazil seeks to increase its engagement in the manner in which it is currently pursuing it – essentially by deploying troops – the more Brazil actively constructs its own subalternity with regards to international peace. In order to develop this argument, this paper initially delineates the Brazilian historical engagement within peace missions. Then, it critically problematizes such engagement by analysing it in light of the particular role that peace operations play within international politics. <![CDATA[International Security and Defense - Taking stock of Brazil’s changes: a special issue of RBPI]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0034-73292017000200301&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Abstract It is clear that Brazil seeks to enhance its international standing through an increasing engagement with peace operations. This paper argues that the more Brazil seeks to increase its engagement in the manner in which it is currently pursuing it – essentially by deploying troops – the more Brazil actively constructs its own subalternity with regards to international peace. In order to develop this argument, this paper initially delineates the Brazilian historical engagement within peace missions. Then, it critically problematizes such engagement by analysing it in light of the particular role that peace operations play within international politics.