Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Journal of Applied Oral Science]]> http://www.scielo.br/rss.php?pid=1678-775720170004&lang=es vol. 25 num. 4 lang. es <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.br/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.br <![CDATA[New impact of the Journal of Applied Oral Science]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400355&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[Virtual Reality simulator for dental anesthesia training in the inferior alveolar nerve block]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400357&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract Objectives This study shows the development and validation of a dental anesthesia-training simulator, specifically for the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). The system developed provides the tactile sensation of inserting a real needle in a human patient, using Virtual Reality (VR) techniques and a haptic device that can provide a perceived force feedback in the needle insertion task during the anesthesia procedure. Material and Methods To simulate a realistic anesthesia procedure, a Carpule syringe was coupled to a haptic device. The Volere method was used to elicit requirements from users in the Dentistry area; Repeated Measures Two-Way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance), Tukey post-hoc test and averages for the results’ analysis. A questionnaire-based subjective evaluation method was applied to collect information about the simulator, and 26 people participated in the experiments (12 beginners, 12 at intermediate level, and 2 experts). The questionnaire included profile, preferences (number of viewpoints, texture of the objects, and haptic device handler), as well as visual (appearance, scale, and position of objects) and haptic aspects (motion space, tactile sensation, and motion reproduction). Results The visual aspect was considered appropriate and the haptic feedback must be improved, which the users can do by calibrating the virtual tissues’ resistance. The evaluation of visual aspects was influenced by the participants’ experience, according to ANOVA test (F=15.6, p=0.0002, with p&lt;0.01). The user preferences were the simulator with two viewpoints, objects with texture based on images and the device with a syringe coupled to it. Conclusion The simulation was considered thoroughly satisfactory for the anesthesia training, considering the needle insertion task, which includes the correct insertion point and depth, as well as the perception of tissues resistances during the insertion. <![CDATA[The effect of silver nanoparticles on composite shear bond strength to dentin with different adhesion protocols]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400367&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract In Dentistry, restorative materials and oral bacteria are believed to be responsible for restoration failure. To make long-lasting restorations, antibacterial agents should be made. Inorganic nanoparticles and their nano composites are applied as good antibacterial agents. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles on composite shear bond strength using one etch and rinse and one self-etch adhesive systems. Material and Methods Silver nanoparticles were prepared. Transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the structure of the particles. Nanoparticles were applied on exposed dentin and then different adhesives and composites were applied. All samples were tested by universal testing machine and shear bond strength was assesed. Results Particles with average diameter of about 20 nm and spherical shape were found. Moreover, it was shown that pretreatment by silver nanoparticles enhanced shear bond strength in both etch and rinse, and in self-etch adhesive systems (p≤0.05). Conclusions Considering the positive antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles, using them is recommended in restorative dentistry. It seems that silver nanoparticles could have positive effects on bond strength of both etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. The best results of silver nanoparticles have been achieved with Adper Single Bond and before acid etching. <![CDATA[Evaluation of physicochemical properties of root-end filling materials using conventional and Micro-CT tests]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400374&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract Objective To evaluate solubility, dimensional stability, filling ability and volumetric change of root-end filling materials using conventional tests and new Micro-CT-based methods. Material and Methods Solubility (loss of mass) after 7 and 30 days, and dimensional stability (in mm) were evaluated in accordance with Carvalho-Junior, et al. 7 (2007). The filling ability and volumetric change (in mm3) were evaluated by Micro-CT (Bruker-MicroCT, Kontich, Belgium) using resin models with cavities 3 mm deep and 1 mm in diameter. The cavities were filled with materials to evaluate filling ability, and then scanned by Micro-CT. After 7 and 30 days immersed in distilled water, the filled cavities were scanned again to evaluate the volumetric change. MTA Angelus (MTA), Biodentine (BIO) and zinc oxide-eugenol cement (ZOE) were evaluated. Data were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test with 5% significance level. Results The results suggested correlated or complementary data between the proposed tests. At 7 days, BIO showed higher solubility and at 30 days, showed higher volumetric change in comparison with MTA (p&lt;0.05). With regard to volumetric change, the tested materials were similar (p&gt;0.05) at 7 days. At 30 days, they presented similar solubility. BIO and MTA showed higher dimensional stability than ZOE (p&lt;0.05). ZOE and BIO showed higher filling ability (p&lt;0.05). Conclusions ZOE presented a higher dimensional change, and BIO had greater solubility after 7 days. BIO presented filling ability and dimensional stability, but greater volumetric change than MTA after 30 days. Micro-CT can provide important data on the physicochemical properties of materials complementing conventional tests. <![CDATA[Does laser diode irradiation improve the degree of conversion of simplified dentin bonding systems?]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400381&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract Simplified dentin-bonding systems are clinically employed for most adhesive procedures, and they are prone to hydrolytic degradation. Objective This study aimed to investigate the effect of laser diode irradiation on the degree of conversion (DC), water sorption (WS), and water solubility (WSB) of these bonding systems in an attempt to improve their physico-mechanical resistance. Material and Methods Two bonding agents were tested: a two-step total-etch system [Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE (SB)] and a universal system [Adper™ Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE (SU)]. Square-shaped specimens were prepared and assigned into 4 groups (n=5): SB and SU (control groups – no laser irradiation) and SB-L and SU-L [SB and SU laser (L) – irradiated groups]. DC was assessed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance. Additional uncured resin samples (≈3.0 µL, n=5) of each adhesive were also scanned for final DC calculation. For WS/WSB tests, similar specimens (n=10) were prepared and measured by monitoring the mass changes after dehydration/water storage cycles. For both tests, adhesive fluids were dropped into standardized Teflon molds (6.0×6.0×1.0 mm), irradiated with a 970-nm laser diode, and then polymerized with an LED-curing unit (1 W/cm2). Results Laser irradiation immediately before photopolymerization increased the DC (%) of the tested adhesives: SB-L&gt;SB&gt;SU-L&gt;SU. For WS/WSB (μg/mm3), only the dentin bonding system (DBS) was a significant factor (p&lt;0.05): SB&gt;SU. Conclusion Irradiation with a laser diode improved the degree of conversion of all tested simplified dentin bonding systems, with no impact on water sorption and solubility. <![CDATA[Treatment of experimental periodontal disease by laser therapy in simvastatin-modified rats]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400387&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract Low intensity laser can be used as a promising alternative in the treatment of periodontal disease. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as an adjuvant treatment for scaling and root planing (SRP) for the treatment of induced periodontitis in simvastatin-modified rats. Material and Methods A total of 180 rats were evenly divided into two groups: Veh – receiving oral administration of polyethylene glycol (vehicle); S – receiving oral administration of Simvastatin. Periodontal disease was induced in both groups at the first mandibular molar. After seven days, the ligature was removed and the animals were divided into subgroups according to the following local treatments: NT – no treatment; SRP – scaling and root planing and irrigation with saline solution; and LLLT ¬– SRP and laser irradiation (660 nm; 0.03 W; 4 J). Ten animals in each subgroup/local treatment were euthanized at 7, 15 and 30 days. Samples of gingival tissue were processed to analyze the tissue oxidative damage and radiographic analysis. Levels of oxidative stress were analyzed by the expressions of Tripeptideglutathione (TG), Malondialdehyde (MDA) and Carbonylated Proteins (CP). Results The animals in S group had higher levels of TG and lower levels of MDA and CP compared with Veh group (p&lt;0.05). Radiographically, in the intragroup analysis Veh and S, LLLT showed lower bone loss (BL) compared with NT and SRP, in all experimental periods (p&lt;0.01). In addition, a lower BL was observed for the animals of Veh group treated with LLLT compared with treatment SRP in the S group, in all experimental periods. Conclusion Within the limits of this study, we can conclude that LLLT was effective as adjuvant treatment for SRP protecting against the occurrence of oxidative tissue damages as well as for reducing alveolar bone loss in experimentally induced periodontitis simvastatin-modified rats. <![CDATA[Effect of photodynamic therapy and non-thermal plasma on root canal filling: analysis of adhesion and sealer penetration]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400396&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and non-thermal plasma (NTP) on adhesion and sealer penetration in root canals. Material and Methods Sixty single-rooted premolars were used. The teeth were prepared using a crown-down technique. NaOCl and EDTA were used for irrigation and smear layer removal, respectively. The root canals were divided into three groups: control, PDT, and NTP. After treatments, the roots were filled using gutta-percha and either AH Plus (AHP) or MTA Fillapex (MTAF) sealers. Samples were sectioned at 4, 8, and 12 mm from the apex (1-mm slices)and analyzed by the push-out bond strength test (adhesion) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (sealer penetration). Data were statistically evaluated using Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn’s, and Spearman’s tests. Results Regarding AHP, bond strength was similar in the NTP group and in the control group, but significantly lower in the PDT group. As to MTAF, both therapies showed lower values than the control group. In the confocal analysis of AHP, maximum and mean penetration, and penetrated area were statistically higher in the control group than in the PDT and NTP groups. Penetrated perimeter was similar among groups. Regarding MTAF, all parameters yielded better results in the NTP than in the control group. The PDT and control groups showed similar results except for penetrated area. Conclusion PDT and plasma therapy affected the adhesion and sealer penetration of root canals filled with AH Plus and MTA Fillapex and there is no positive correlation between adhesion and sealer penetration. <![CDATA[Development of a self-report questionnaire designed for population-based surveillance of gingivitis in adolescents: assessment of content validity and reliability]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400404&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract The major infectious diseases in Chile encompass the periodontal diseases, with a combined prevalence that rises up to 90% of the population. Thus, the population-based surveillance of periodontal diseases plays a central role for assessing their prevalence and for planning, implementing, and evaluating preventive and control programs. Self-report questionnaires have been proposed for the surveillance of periodontal diseases in adult populations world-wide. Objective This study aimed to develop and assess the content validity and reliability of a cognitively adapted self-report questionnaire designed for surveillance of gingivitis in adolescents. Material and Methods Ten predetermined self-report questions evaluating early signs and symptoms of gingivitis were preliminary assessed by a panel of clinical experts. Eight questions were selected and cognitively tested in 20 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years from Santiago de Chile. The questionnaire was then conducted and answered by 178 Chilean adolescents. Internal consistency was measured using the Cronbach’s alpha and temporal stability was calculated using the Kappa-index. Results A reliable final self-report questionnaire consisting of 5 questions was obtained, with a total Cronbach’s alpha of 0.73 and a Kappa-index ranging from 0.41 to 0.77 between the different questions. Conclusions The proposed questionnaire is reliable, with an acceptable internal consistency and a temporal stability from moderate to substantial, and it is promising for estimating the prevalence of gingivitis in adolescents. <![CDATA[Mechanical properties, water sorption characteristics, and compound release of grape seed extract-incorporated resins]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400412&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract Objective This study evaluated the effect of grape seed extract (GSE) incorporation on the mechanical properties, water sorption, solubility, and GSE release from the experimental adhesive resins. Material and Methods An experimental comonomer mixture, consisting of 40% Bis-GMA, 30% Bis MP, 28% HEMA, 0.26% camphorquinone and 1% EDMAB, was used to prepare four GSE-incorporated adhesive resins at concentrations of 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 wt%. The neat resin without GSE was used as the control. Six resin beams (25 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm) per group were prepared for flexural strength and modulus of elasticity evaluations using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Five disks (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) per group were used for microhardness measurements using a Leitz micro-hardness tester with Leica Qgo software. Five disks (7 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) per group were prepared and stored in deionized water for 28 days. Water sorption, solubility, and GSE release in deionized water were calculated for each GSE-incorporated adhesive at the end of 28th day. Data was evaluated using one-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparisons. Results Flexural strength, modulus of elasticity and microhardness of GSE-incorporated adhesive decreased significantly with incorporation of 1.5% of GSE (p&lt;0.05). Addition of GSE had no effect on the water sorption of the adhesive resins (p=0.33). The solubility of the resin also increased significantly with incorporation of 1.5% of GSE (p&lt;0.05). Quantities of GSE release increased with increased concentration of GSE in the adhesive resin. Conclusion Up to 1% of GSE can be incorporated into a dental adhesive resin without interfering with the mechanical properties or solubility of the resins. <![CDATA[Effect of vegetable oils applied over acquired enamel pellicle on initial erosion]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400420&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract Objective The prevalence of dental erosion has been recently increasing, requiring new preventive and therapeutic approaches. Vegetable oils have been studied in preventive dentistry because they come from a natural, edible, low-cost, and worldwide accessible source. This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of different vegetable oils, applied in two concentrations, on initial enamel erosion. Material and Methods Initially, the acquired pellicle was formed in situ for 2 hours. Subsequently, the enamel blocks were treated in vitro according to the study group (n=12/per group): GP5 and GP100 – 5% and pure palm oil, respectively; GC5 and GC100 – 5% and pure coconut oil; GSa5 and GSa100 – 5% and pure safflower oil; GSu5 and GSu100 – 5% and pure sunflower oil; GO5 and GO100 – 5% and pure olive oil; CON− – Deionized Water (negative control) and CON+ – Commercial Mouthwash (Elmex® Erosion Protection Dental Rinse, GABA/positive control). Then, the enamel blocks were immersed in artificial saliva for 2 minutes and subjected to short-term acid exposure in 0.5% citric acid, pH 2.4, for 30 seconds, to promote enamel surface softening. The response variable was the percentage of surface hardness loss [((SHi - SHf) / SHf )×100]. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p&lt;0.05). Results Enamel blocks of GP100 presented similar hardness loss to GSu100 (p&gt;0.05) and less than the other groups (p&lt;0.05). There was no difference between GP5, GC5, GC100, GSa5, GSu100, GSa100, GSu5, GO5, GO100, CON− and CON+. Conclusion Palm oil seems to be a promising alternative for preventing enamel erosion. However, further studies are necessary to evaluate a long-term erosive cycling. <![CDATA[Two-point discrimination values vary depending on test site, sex and test modality in the orofacial region: a preliminary study]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400427&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract The two-point discrimination (TPD) test is one of the most commonly used neurosensory tests to assess mechanoperception in the clinical settings. While there have been numerous studies of functional sensibility of the hand using TPD test, there have been relatively not enough reports on TPD in the orofacial region. Objective The aims of the present study were to determine the normal values of TPD in the six trigeminal sites (the forehead, cheek, mentum, upper lip, lower lip, and the tongue tip) and to investigate the effect of the site, sex, and test modality on the TPD perception. Material and Methods Forty healthy volunteers consisting of age-matched men (20) and women (20) with a mean age of 27.1 years were recruited. One examiner performed the TPD test using a simple hand-operated device, i.e., by drawing compass with a blunt or sharp-pointed tip. The static TPD with a blunt-pointed tip (STPDB), moving TPD with a blunt-pointed tip (MTPDB), and static TPD with a sharp-pointed tip (STPDS) were measured. The predictors were the site, sex, and test modality, and the outcome variable was the TPD value. Three-way ANOVA was used for statistics. Results The analysis showed a significant effect of the site, sex and test modality on the TPD values. Significant differences between the test sites were observed with the descending order from the forehead and cheek&gt;mentum&gt;upper lip and lower lip&gt;tongue tip and index finger. Women showed lower TPD values than those of men. The STPDS measurements were consistently lower than those of the STPDB and MTPDB. Conclusions The normal values of TPD in this study suggest that the cheek and forehead were less sensitive than other regions evaluated and women were more sensitive than men. The STPDS was the most sensitive test modality. <![CDATA[Bacterial endotoxin adhesion to different types of orthodontic adhesives]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400436&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract Bacterial endotoxin (LPS) adhesion to orthodontic brackets is a known contributing factor to inflammation of the adjacent gingival tissues. Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems, comparing two commercial brands. Material and Methods Forty specimens were fabricated from Transbond XT and Light Bond composite and bonding agent components (n=10/component), then contaminated by immersion in a bacterial endotoxin solution. Contaminated and non-contaminated acrylic resin samples were used as positive and negative control groups, respectively. LPS quantification was performed by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate QCL-1000™ test. Data obtained were scored and subjected to the Chi-square test using a significance level of 5%. Results There was endotoxin adhesion to all materials (p&lt;0.05). No statistically significant difference was found between composites/bonding agents and acrylic resin (p&gt;0.05). There was no significant difference (p&gt;0.05) among commercial brands. Affinity of endotoxin was significantly greater for the bonding agents (p=0.0025). Conclusions LPS adhered to both orthodontic adhesive systems. Regardless of the brand, the endotoxin had higher affinity for the bonding agents than for the composites. There is no previous study assessing the affinity of LPS for orthodontic adhesive systems. This study revealed that LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems. Therefore, additional care is recommended to orthodontic applications of these materials. <![CDATA[Caries progression in non-cavitated fissures after infiltrant application: a 3-year follow-up of a randomized controlled clinical trial]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400442&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of a conservative treatment to prevent the progression of caries using an infiltrant on non-cavitated pit and fissures. Material and Methods This controlled clinical trial selected 23 volunteers with clinically and radiographically non-cavitated occlusal caries among patients presenting a “rather low” to “very high” caries risk. Eighty-six teeth were randomly divided into two experimental groups: teeth receiving a commercial pit-and-fissure sealant (Alpha Seal-DFL) and contralateral teeth receiving Icon infiltrant (DMG). Caries progression was monitored by clinical (laser fluorescence caries detection) and radiographic examination at 12-month intervals over a period of 3 years of monitored caries progression. Probing the sealing materials to detect areas of retention was also used to evaluate marginal integrity. Results Statistical analysis showed no difference in caries progression using laser fluorescence caries detection when both materials were compared, regardless of the evaluation times (p&gt;0.05). No significance was observed when the marginal sealant integrity of both materials was compared, regardless of the evaluation time (p&lt;0.05). Marginal integrity significantly reduced after 1 year for both materials (p&lt;0.05), but remained stable after 2 and 3 years of evaluation, compared with 1-year results (p&gt;0.05). SEM analysis exhibited a more homogeneous sealing for the infiltrant than obtained by the sealant. Conclusions The infiltrant was effective to prevent the caries progression in non-cavitated pit-and-fissures after 3 years of clinical evaluation, comparable with the conventional sealant. The infiltrant also presented better results in terms of caries progression at the 3-year evaluation time using the radiographic analysis. <![CDATA[Chondroblastic osteosarcoma mimicking periapical abscess]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400455&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract Lesions of non-endodontic origin may mimic periapical abscess. Osteosarcoma is a rare malignant lesion. Case report The present report describes a case of chondroblastic osteosarcoma in the periapical region of teeth #29, #30, and #31 of an 18-year-old male. Clinical history showed self-reported discomfort in the right posterior gingiva for over a month. Physical examination showed a small expansion and redness of the right mandibular buccal and lingual cortical plates, but no signs of pain or inflammation were observed. All the teeth responded positively to pulp sensibility. Periapical and panoramic radiographs showed slight periapical radiolucency in the roots of teeth #29 and #30, clear periodontal ligament space widening, and evident loss of lamina dura. Incisional biopsy was performed, and based on microscopic findings the diagnosis of chondroblastic osteosarcoma was confirmed. Conclusions Non-endodontic diseases associated with tooth root apex, such as chondroblastic osteosarcoma, should be included in differential diagnosis of jaw lesions that resemble periapical abscess. <![CDATA[ERRATUM]]> http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1678-77572017000400462&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Abstract Lesions of non-endodontic origin may mimic periapical abscess. Osteosarcoma is a rare malignant lesion. Case report The present report describes a case of chondroblastic osteosarcoma in the periapical region of teeth #29, #30, and #31 of an 18-year-old male. Clinical history showed self-reported discomfort in the right posterior gingiva for over a month. Physical examination showed a small expansion and redness of the right mandibular buccal and lingual cortical plates, but no signs of pain or inflammation were observed. All the teeth responded positively to pulp sensibility. Periapical and panoramic radiographs showed slight periapical radiolucency in the roots of teeth #29 and #30, clear periodontal ligament space widening, and evident loss of lamina dura. Incisional biopsy was performed, and based on microscopic findings the diagnosis of chondroblastic osteosarcoma was confirmed. Conclusions Non-endodontic diseases associated with tooth root apex, such as chondroblastic osteosarcoma, should be included in differential diagnosis of jaw lesions that resemble periapical abscess.