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vol.56 issue1CLINICAL AND ENDOSCOPIC EVALUATION IN PATIENTS WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL SYMPTOMSPREDICTORS OF UNSUCCESSFUL OF TREATMENT FOR FECAL INCONTINENCE BIOFEEDBACK FOR FECAL INCONTINENCE IN FEMALE author indexsubject indexarticles search
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Arquivos de Gastroenterologia

Print version ISSN 0004-2803On-line version ISSN 1678-4219

Abstract

TESS, Beatriz H; MAXIMIANO-FERREIRA, Letícia; PAJECKI, Denis  and  WANG, Yuan-Pang. BARIATRIC SURGERY AND BINGE EATING DISORDER: SHOULD SURGEONS CARE ABOUT IT? A LITERATURE REVIEW OF PREVALENCE AND ASSESSMENT TOOLS. Arq. Gastroenterol. [online]. 2019, vol.56, n.1, pp.55-60.  Epub May 20, 2019. ISSN 1678-4219.  https://doi.org/10.1590/s0004-2803.201900000-10.

BACKGROUND:

Eating pathologies among bariatric surgery candidates are common and associated with adverse surgical outcomes, including weight regain and low quality of life. However, their assessment is made difficult by the great variety and inconsistent use of standardized measures.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this review was to synthesize current knowledge on the prevalence of binge eating disorder (BED) in presurgical patients and to make a critical appraisal of assessment tools for BED.

METHODS:

A search was conducted on PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science databases from January 1994 to March 2017. Data were extracted, tabulated and summarized using a narrative approach.

RESULTS:

A total of 21 observational studies were reviewed for data extraction and analysis. Prevalence of BED in bariatric populations ranged from 2% to 53%. Considerable variation in patient characteristics and in BED assessment measures was evident among the studies. In addition, several methodological weaknesses were recognized in most of the studies. Ten different psychometric instruments were used to assess BED. Clinical interviews were used in only 12 studies, though this is the preferred tool to diagnose BED.

CONCLUSION:

Study heterogeneity accounted for the variability of the results from different centers and methodological flaws such as insufficient sample size and selection bias impaired the evidence on the magnitude of BED in surgical settings. For the sake of comparability and generalizability of the findings in future studies, researchers must recruit representative samples of treatment-seeking candidates for bariatric surgery and systematically apply standard instruments for the assessment of BED.

Keywords : Obesity; Bariatric surgery; Binge-eating disorder; Adult; Prevalence; Review.

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