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Revista do Hospital das Clínicas

versión On-line ISSN 1678-9903

Resumen

YAZBEK, Guilherme et al. Endovascular techniques for placement of long-term chemotherapy catheters. Rev. Hosp. Clin. [online]. 2003, vol.58, n.4, pp.215-218. ISSN 1678-9903.  https://doi.org/10.1590/S0041-87812003000400005.

PURPOSE: To analyze the results from using endovascular techniques to place long-term chemotherapy catheters when advancing the catheter using the external jugular vein is difficult due to obstructions or kinking. METHODS: Between July 1997 and August 2000, 320 long-term chemotherapy catheters were placed, and in 220 cases the external jugular vein was used as the primary venous approach. In 18 of these patients, correct positioning was not achieved and several endovascular techniques were then utilized to overcome these obstacles, including manipulation of a J-wire with a moveable core, venography, and the exchange wire technique. RESULTS: In 94.5% of the patients with difficulties in obtaining the correct positioning, we were able to advance the long-term catheter to the desired position with the assistance of endovascular techniques. CONCLUSIONS: Venography and endovascular guidance techniques are useful for the placement of long-term catheters in the external jugular vein.

Palabras clave : Endovascular techniques; External jugular vein; Guide wire; Long-term chemotherapy catheter; Stenosis and kinking.

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