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vol.39 issue5LITTERFALL ASSESSEMENT IN A FRAGMENT OF SECONDARY TROPICAL FOREST, IBIÚNA, SP, SOUTHEASTERN BRAZIL1 author indexsubject indexarticles search
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Revista Árvore

Print version ISSN 0100-6762On-line version ISSN 1806-9088

Abstract

SILVA, Celice Alexandre  and  VIEIRA, Milene Faria. FLOWERING AND POLLINATORS OF THREE DISTYLOUS SPECIES OF Psychotria (Rubiaceae) CO-OCCURRING IN THE BRAZILIAN ATLANTIC FOREST1. Rev. Árvore [online]. 2015, vol.39, n.5, pp.779-789. ISSN 0100-6762.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0100-67622015000500001.

This study investigates the flowering and pollinators of the floral morphs of three co-occurring distylous species, Psychotria conjugens Müll, P. hastisepala Müll. Arg. and P. sessilis Vell., in two consecutive flowering seasons in an Atlantic Forest fragment in southeastern Brazil. The species have diurnal, cream-colored, tubular, nectariferous flowers and their flowering occurs in the rainy season, from September to April, with little or no overlapping between species, characterizing a staggered flowering. The flowering of the long-and short-styled floral morphs of each species was synchronous, but the number of open flowers per day per morph tended to vary in each flowering season. These numbers were higher in P. sessilis and P. conjugens and, probably, resulted in higher total numbers of visits on its flowers (up to 1084 visits in P. sessilis and 756 in P. conjugens), compared to that observed in P. hastisepala (up to 71). There was a higher frequency of visits to long-styled flowers of all species. The bee Ariphanarthra palpalis was a common pollinator to all species. This bee is native to Brazil, solitary, considered relatively rare and its host plants were unknown. Other native bees (Melipona spp.) also visited the flowers of the Psychotria species. The availability of flowers with similar floral features over eight months, the staggered flowering and common pollinators appear to be part of a strategy to attract floral visitors, minimizing the competition for pollinators and then favoring the legitimate pollination of these plants.

Keywords : Bees; Sequential flowering; Frequency of visits.

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