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Pesquisa Veterinária Brasileira

Print version ISSN 0100-736X

Abstract

QUEIROZ, Paula V.S. et al. Cranial and caudal mesenteric arteries in rock cavy Kerodon rupestris (Wied, 1820). Pesq. Vet. Bras. [online]. 2011, vol.31, n.7, pp.623-626. ISSN 0100-736X.  https://doi.org/10.1590/S0100-736X2011000700013.

In this study about the origin and ramification of the cranial (CrMA) and caudal (CaMA) mesenteric collateral arteries of the rock cavy, 20 animals (18 males and 2 females) of different ages, originated from the Wild Animals Multiplication Center of the Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Árido (Cemas/Ufersa), were used. After the natural death, the walls of the abdominal cavity of the animals, in the left antimere, were dissected to cannulate to the aorta in pre-diaphragmatic path. Then they were fixed in 10% formaline and conditioned in order to study their anatomy. The results showed that in 18 animals (90%) the CrMA arose, separately, of the abdominal aorta, soon after the celiac artery (CA), originating, by this time, the middle colic (MCo), caudal pancreaticduodenal (CPD), duodenojejune (DJ), jejune (J) and ileocecocolic (ICeCo) trunk from which derives the ileocecal (ICe) and the right colic (RCo) arteries. In one rock cavy (5%), the CrMA and CA originate from abdominal aorta in a common trunk. In this case the CrMA originated the CPD, MCo, ICeCo, and J. In one observation (5%) CrMA and CaMA appear in common trunk. In this animal, CPD, DJ, ICeCo, MCo and J arteries were originated of the CrMA, while the left colic (LCo) and rectal cranial (RCr) arteries were originated of the CaMA. Regarding the CaMA, in 20 cases (100,00%) it originates the LCo and the rectal cranial arteries.

Keywords : Irrigation; wild rodents; anatomy; abdominal; pelvic organs.

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