SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.21 issue2OAT FLOUR/WAXY CORN STARCH BLENDS FOR SNACKS PRODUCTIONEVALUATION OF GROWTH AND ENTEROTOXIGENIC CAPACITY OF COAGULASE-NEGATIVE LOW-ENTEROTOXIN-PRODUCING STAPHYLOCOCCAL STRAINS IN EXPERIMENTALLY INOCULATED FOOD author indexsubject indexarticles search
Home Pagealphabetic serial listing  

Services on Demand

Journal

Article

Indicators

Related links

Share


Food Science and Technology

Print version ISSN 0101-2061On-line version ISSN 1678-457X

Abstract

SOARES, Eliana Costa et al. DEHYDRATION OF ACEROLA PULP (Malpighia emarginata D.C.) BY FOAM-MAT DRYING PROCESS. Ciênc. Tecnol. Aliment. [online]. 2001, vol.21, n.2, pp.164-170. ISSN 0101-2061.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0101-20612001000200008.

A food supplement from dehydrated pulp using a non-conventional method of FOAM-MAT was produced. Several tests have been accomplished using different chemical agents to facilitate the foam formation, and an experiment has been chosen that most adjusted to the recommended density parameter (0.1 to 0.6). After the definition of the experimental conditions, the pulp was formulated and dehydrated in a drying hot-house with air circulation at a temperature of 60 to 70°C for 90 minutes. The product obtained was a powder with final humidity of 7.2%. Concomitant to the experiment the chemical analysis of the pulp had been accomplished. The obtained powder was immediately afterwards analysed with the purpose of identifying the new characteristics of the product and packed in 25g metalized bags and submitted to stability studies for a period of 3 months. Analysis of the results obtained showed that there was an increase in the basic nutrients mainly regarding to the content of vitamin C that showed an increase 10 times higher than natural pulp.

Keywords : food supplement; dehydratation; acerola.

        · abstract in Portuguese     · text in Portuguese     · Portuguese ( pdf )

 

Creative Commons License All the contents of this journal, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License