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Revista Brasileira de História

versão impressa ISSN 0102-0188versão On-line ISSN 1806-9347

Resumo

PEREIRA, Matheus Serva. Black Drums, White Ears: Colonialism and the Homogenization of Social and Cultural Practices in Southern Mozambique (1890-1940). Rev. Bras. Hist. [online]. 2019, vol.39, n.80, pp.155-177.  Epub 08-Abr-2019. ISSN 0102-0188.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1806-93472019v39n80-07.

In this article, I analyse how practices referred to generically in the historical documentation as ‘batuque’ (drums) underwent a process of homogenization and scrutinization by diverse Portuguese colonial agents. On one hand, the co­lonial agents insisted on unifying everything they saw as dance and music under the generic category of ‘batuque.’ On the other hand, the need for a better understanding of the subordinate Africans ended up producing colonial responses that shifted between a dissection of the term in search of a more accurate apprehension of what was being observed and an incorporation of these practices into the colonial enterprise. This process was conceived by the colonial agents as a way of appropriating the dances, songs and music made by the natives of southern Mozambique into the ultramarine Portuguese nationalist discourse.

Palavras-chave : colonialism; homogenization; ‘batuques’; Southern Mozambique.

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