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Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia

versão impressa ISSN 0365-0596

Resumo

PETRY, Vanessa et al. Bacterial skin colonization and infections in patients with atopic dermatitis. An. Bras. Dermatol. [online]. 2012, vol.87, n.5, pp.729-734. ISSN 0365-0596.  https://doi.org/10.1590/S0365-05962012000500010.

Atopic Dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects a large number of children and adults. The disease results from an interaction between genetic predisposition, host environment, skin barrier defects, and immunological factors. A major aggravating factor associated with Atopic Dermatitis is the presence of microorganisms on the patient's skin surface. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, for instance, can exacerbate chronic skin inflammation. As a result, antimicrobials have often been prescribed to control the acute phase of the disease. However, increased bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents has made it difficult for dermatologists to prescribe appropriate medication. In the presence of disseminated dermatitis with secondary infection, systemic antibiotics need to be prescribed; however, treatment should be individualized, in an attempt to find the most effective antibiotic with fewer side effects. Also, the medication should be used for as short as possible in order to minimize bacterial resistance.

Palavras-chave : Bacterial growth; Bacterial infections; Dermatitis, atopic; Transformation, bacterial.

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