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vol.33 issue1Phosphorus and cut system on the productivity and tillering of the capim-de-raiz (Chloris orthonoton, Doell)Response of oats to fertilization on red yellow latosol in two planting systems author indexsubject indexarticles search
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Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia

Print version ISSN 1516-3598On-line version ISSN 1806-9290

Abstract

PRIMAVESI, Ana Cândida et al. Nitrogen fertilization in coastcross grass: effects on nutrient extraction and apparent nitrogen recovery . R. Bras. Zootec. [online]. 2004, vol.33, n.1, pp.68-78. ISSN 1516-3598.  https://doi.org/10.1590/S1516-35982004000100010.

Contents, nutrient extraction, and apparent applied N recovery were determined in a coastcross pasture established on a dark red latosol (Hapludox), in São Carlos, SP, Brazil, receiving five rates of N as urea or amonium nitrate, surface-applied (0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 kg ha-1 cutting-1) in five consecutive periods, during the rainy season. Nutrient extraction increased with increasing nitrogen rates. When forage yield was high (treatment with 500 kg ha-1 year-1 of N) and for both fertilizers, macronutrient extraction was greater for K and N, followed by Ca, S, P, and Mg. Micronutrient extraction occurred in the following decreasing order: Fe, Mn, Zn, and Cu. Nitrogen recoveries from urea and ammonium nitrate surface-applied on coastcross pasture were calculated. Significant differences occurred within periods (P<0.05), depending on climatic conditions. Mean N recovery of urea was about 68% of that of ammonium nitrate. Recovery of ammonium nitrate-N ranged from 68 to 75% of applied N.

Keywords : ammonium nitrate; biomass production; Cynodon dactylon; nitrogen levels; nitrogen uptake; urea.

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