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Brazilian Journal of Biology

versión impresa ISSN 1519-6984versión On-line ISSN 1678-4375

Resumen

LIU, X. A.; PENG, Y.; LI, J. J.  y  PENG, P. H.. Enhanced shoot investment makes invasive plants exhibit growth advantages in high nitrogen conditions. Braz. J. Biol. [online]. 2019, vol.79, n.1, pp.15-21.  Epub 12-Mar-2018. ISSN 1519-6984.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1519-6984.169578.

Resource amendments commonly promote plant invasions, raising concerns over the potential consequences of nitrogen (N) deposition; however, it is unclear whether invaders will benefit from N deposition more than natives. Growth is among the most fundamental inherent traits of plants and thus good invaders may have superior growth advantages in response to resource amendments. We compared the growth and allocation between invasive and native plants in different N regimes including controls (ambient N concentrations). We found that invasive plants always grew much larger than native plants in varying N conditions, regardless of growth- or phylogeny-based analyses, and that the former allocated more biomass to shoots than the latter. Although N addition enhanced the growth of invasive plants, this enhancement did not increase with increasing N addition. Across invasive and native species, changes in shoot biomass allocation were positively correlated with changes in whole-plant biomass; and the slope of this relationship was greater in invasive plants than native plants. These findings suggest that enhanced shoot investment makes invasive plants retain a growth advantage in high N conditions relative to natives, and also highlight that future N deposition may increase the risks of plant invasions.

Palabras clave : allocation strategies; invasive plants; native plants; nitrogen amendments; resource allocation.

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