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Jornal Brasileiro de Pneumologia

On-line version ISSN 1806-3756

Abstract

GODOY, Dagoberto Vanoni de et al. Yoga versus aerobic activity: effects on spirometry results and maximal inspiratory pressure. J. bras. pneumol. [online]. 2006, vol.32, n.2, pp.130-135. ISSN 1806-3756.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1806-37132006000200008.

OBJECTIVE: To clarify whether, in healthy individuals, practicing yoga can modify maximal inspiratory pressure and spirometric indices when compared with the practice of aerobic exercise. MEYHODS: A controlled clinical trial. A total of 31 healthy volunteers were allocated to practice aerobic exercise (n = 15) or to practice yoga (n = 16). Those in the first group served as controls and engaged in aerobic exercise for 45-60 minutes, twice a week for three months. Those in the second group practiced selected yogic techniques, also in sessions of 45-60 minutes, twice a week for three months. Forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second and maximal inspiratory pressure were measured before and after the three months of training. RESULTS: No significant alterations were seen in the spirometric indices. A slight, although not significant, improvement in maximal inspiratory pressure was seen in both groups. However, there was a significant difference, seen in both genders, between the absolute delta (final value minus baseline value) of maximal inspiratory pressure for the group practicing yoga and that obtained for the group engaging in aerobic exercise (males: 19.5 cm H2O versus 2.8 cm H2O, p = 0.05; females: 20 cm H2O versus 3.9 cm H2O, p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Neither yoga nor aerobic exercise provided a statistically significant improvement in maximal inspiratory pressure after three months. However, the absolute variation in maximal inspiratory pressure was greater among those practicing yoga.

Keywords : Yoga; Exercise; Respiratory muscles; Respiratory function tests; Maximal voluntary ventilation; Spirometry; Inspiratory capacity [physiology].

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