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Dementia & Neuropsychologia

Print version ISSN 1980-5764

Abstract

VALE, Patrícia Helena Figueirêdo do et al. Comparison of performance on neuropsychological tests in amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's disease patients. Dement. neuropsychol. [online]. 2009, vol.3, n.1, pp.41-48. ISSN 1980-5764.  https://doi.org/10.1590/S1980-57642009DN30100009.

Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) can be an intermediate state between normality and dementia in some patients. An early diagnosis, through neuropsychological assessment, could identify individuals at risk of developing dementia.

Objective:

To verify differences in performance on neuropsychological tests among controls, amnestic MCI (aMCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients.

Methods:

Sixty-eight AD patients (mean age 73.77±7.24; mean schooling 9.04±4.83; 40 women and 28 men), 34 aMCI patients (mean age 74.44±7.05; mean schooling 12.35±4.01; 20 women) and 60 controls (mean age 68.90±7.48; mean schooling 10.72±4.74; 42 women) were submitted to a neuropsychological assessment composed of tasks assessing executive functions, language, constructive abilities, reasoning and memory.

Results:

There were statistically significant differences in performance across all tests among control, aMCI and AD groups, and also between only controls and AD patients. On comparing control and aMCI groups, we found statistically significant differences in memory tasks, except for immediate recall of Visual Reproduction. There were also statistically significant differences between aMCI and AD groups on tasks of constructive and visuoperceptual abilities, attention, language and memory, except for delayed recall of Visual Reproduction.

Conclusions:

Neuropsychological assessment was able to discriminate aMCI from AD patients in almost all tests except for delayed recall of Visual Reproduction, visual organization (Hooper) and executive functions (WCST); and discriminate controls from AD patients in all tests, and controls from aMCI patients in all memory tests except for immediate recall of Visual Reproduction.

Keywords : Mild Cognitive Impairment; Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment; Alzheimer's disease; neuropsychological tests; memory..

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