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Zoologia (Curitiba)

Print version ISSN 1984-4670On-line version ISSN 1984-4689

Abstract

BIAGOLINI-JR, Carlos et al. Extra-pair paternity in a Neotropical rainforest songbird, the White-necked Thrush Turdus albicollis (Aves: Turdidae). Zoologia (Curitiba) [online]. 2016, vol.33, n.4, e20160068.  Epub Sep 05, 2016. ISSN 1984-4670.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-4689zool-20160068.

Over the last two decades, several studies have shown that the mating systems of various birds are more complex than previously believed, and paternity tests performed with molecular techniques have proved, for instance, that the commonly observed social monogamy often presents important variations, such as extra-pair paternity. However, data are still largely biased towards temperate species. In our study, at an area of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, we found broods containing at least one extra-pair young (EPY) in the socially monogamous White-necked Thrush Turdus albicollis (Vieillot, 1818). Paternity tests using six heterologous microsatellite loci revealed that four of 11 broods (36.4%) presented at least one extra-pair young (EPY). This rate of EPY is within the range found for other studies in the tropics. This is one of the few studies that present detailed paternity analyses of a Neotropical rainforest passerine. Our findings corroborate the early insights that breeding strategies involving cheating can also be widespread among Neotropical socially monogamous songbirds.

Keywords : Cuckoldry; extra-pair copulation; infidelity; social monogamy.

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