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Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz

Print version ISSN 0074-0276On-line version ISSN 1678-8060

Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz vol.88 no.1 Rio de Janeiro Jan./Mar. 1993

http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0074-02761993000100006 

Dispersive flight and house invasion by Triatoma guasayana and Triatoma sordida in Argentina

Cristina Wisnivesky Colli1 

Ricardo E. Gürtler2 

Nora D. Solarz1 

Nicolas J. Schweigmann1 

Silvia M. Pietrokovsky1 

Andrea Alberti1 

Juan Flo3 

Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciências Exactas y Naturales, Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas. Unidad Ecología de Reservorios y Vectores de Parásitos, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciências Exactas y Naturales, Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas. Laboratório de Ecología General, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciências Exactas y Naturales, Departamento de Química Biológica, Buenos Aires, Argentina

ABSTRACT

Flight activity and invasion of houses by Triatoma sordida and T. guasayana were studied in the Province of Santiago del Estero, Argentina. Spontaneous findings of both species in houses were recorded from 1982 to 1989. Light trap collections were performed in 1982, 1983 and 1984, at the woods surrounding the settlements of Amamá (43 houses) and Trinidad (19 houses). Most of the 101 triatomines collected, were unfed and negative for Trypanosoma cruzi. T. guasayana predominated over T. sordida, and both appeared on the lighted screens between 19-31 min (mean 24) after dusk and the catch time was 30-45 min. Although entomological evaluation of 41 houses at Amamá performed in September 1985, just before insecticidal spraying, showed that Triatoma infestans predominated, adults of T. guasayana were collected in sleeping places, in 7 houses (17%). Most triatomines invading houses from then up to 1990 were flying T. guasayana (20/27) and females outnumbered males. Three non infected T. guasayana females were fed on man and two T. guasayana males positive for "T. cruzi like" trypanosomes were unfed. Therefore, visiting hungry adults could transmit T. cruzi to people and introduce wild parasites to the domestic cycle. T. guasayana stands as the main potential substitute of T. infestans in the studied area, and it might play there the same role as T. sordida in Brazil.

Key words: Triatoma sordida; Triatoma guasayana; Trypanosoma cruzi; dispersive flight; Argentina

 

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