SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.39 issue4Synthetic cannabinoids: emerging drugs of abuse author indexsubject indexarticles search
Home Pagealphabetic serial listing  

Archives of Clinical Psychiatry

Print version ISSN 0101-6083

Rev. psiquiatr. clín. vol.39 no.4 São Paulo  2012

http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0101-60832012000400006 

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

 

 

Here we present a new initiative of our journal, which aims to stimulate discussion about topics of current interest in Clinical Psychiatry. Authors interested are able to send a letter to the editor from now on aiming to become the focus of new discussions. If accepted, the Journal will invite other specialists in the area to provide their expert opinion, thus promoting debate.

In this issue, we started a debate based on the letter from Andrade-Nascimento et al., which presents different aspects on the comorbidity between Bipolar Disorder (BD) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). We here emphasize the importance of a broad discussion involving nationally and internationally recognized colleagues, reinforcing the relevance of the topic and integrated aspects in the diagnosis of these disorders. Even though the prevalence of anxiety symptoms is frequently associated with the diagnosis of both BD and GAD, the current classification (DSM-IV) has several limitations and challenges to be overcome. These aspects are here critically addressed. This forum provides discussion on potential advances that may arise with the advent of DSM-5, which may give answers on the diagnosis and treatment of this common comorbid condition in our clinical practice.

Rodrigo Machado-Vieira
Editor-assistente

 


 

 

Comorbid generalized anxiety disorder in bipolar disorder: a possible diagnosis?

 

Transtorno bipolar em comorbidade com transtorno de ansiedade generalizada: um diagnóstico possível?

 

 

Monica Andrade-NascimentoI, II; Ângela Miranda-ScippaII; Fabiana Nery-FernandesII; Marlos RochaII; Lucas C. QuarantiniII

IDepartamento de Saúde, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana (UEFS), Feira de Santana, BA, Brasil
IIHospital-Escola, Serviço de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA, Brasil

Address correspondence

 

 

Dear Editor,

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV-TR, 2000) we cannot diagnose Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) in bipolar patients, when it occurs exclusively during a Mood Disorder regardless of illness phase. In fact, Issler et al. (2004)1 have reported that some researchers criticize DSM diagnosis criteria for distinguishing these disorders, because in GAD there are criteria that overlap with those of bipolar disorder (BD). Recently, Goodwin and Jamison in their Comorbidity Chapter of second edition Maniac Depressive Illness Book (2007)2 did not describe anything about GAD when they reviewed the comorbidity of bipolar and anxiety disorders. However, despite these milestones that transform diagnosing of anxiety disorder in bipolar patients to a difficult task, several studies have reported the feasibility of diagnosing the presence of GAD in BD3,4. In fact, several studies have found a higher prevalence of GAD in bipolar patients than in the general population3-5. Albert et al. (2008) have evaluated anxiety comorbidity in euthymic bipolar patients and shown that the current and lifetime prevalence of GAD in euthymic patients is 15.2% and 16.2%, respectively5. So, the question is: If the diagnosis of GAD in bipolar patients is not possible to be made, how can we explain the prevalence of GAD in euthymic patients through the SCID-I? Besides that, if the presence of GAD in 15.2% of euthymic patients was detected, what is the true significance of this rate? Do patients in a euthymic phase actually have GAD as a comorbid condition or is this in fact just a subthreshold presentation of BD? We would appreciate hearing your opinion about the presented issues regarding the role of GAD in each BD phase and the reliability and feasibility of performing a comorbid diagnosis in bipolar individuals. Finally, it would be interesting to study not only the overlapping characteristic but also the boundaries between GAD and BD in order to determine whether distinguishing anxious symptoms from GAD in bipolar patients in feasible and clinically relevant.

 

References

1. Issler CK, Sant'anna MK, Kapczinski F, Lafer B. Comorbidade com transtornos de ansiedade em transtorno bipolar. Rev Bras Psiquiatr. 2004;26(3):31-6.

2. Goodwin FK, Jamison KR. Maniac depressive illness. New York: Oxford University Press Inc.; 2007.

3. Vieta E, Colom F, Corbella B, Martinez-Aran A, Reinares M, Benabarre A, et al. Clinical correlates of psychiatric comorbidity in bipolar I patients. Bipolar Disord. 2001;3:253-8.

4. McIntyre RS, Soczynska JK, Bottas A, Bordbar K, Konarski JZ, Kennedy SH. Anxiety disorders and bipolar disorder: a review. Bipolar Disord. 2006;8:665-76.

5. Albert U, Rosso G, Maina G, Boggeto F. Impact of anxiety disorder comorbidity on quality of life in euthimic bipolar disorder patients: differences between bipolar I and II subtypes. J Affect Disord. 2008;68:297-303.

 

 

Address correspondence to:
Monica Andrade-Nascimento
Hospital Universitário Professor Edgard Santos
Serviço de Psiquiatria
40110-909 Salvador, BA
E-mail: monica@uefs.br

 


 

Commentary on the letter

Re: Comorbid generalized anxiety disorder in bipolar disorder: a possible diagnosis?

 

 

Acioly L. T. Lacerda, MD, PH.D.

Laboratório, Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas (LiNC), Department of Psychiatry, Federal University of Sao Paulo (Unifesp), Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil

 

 

Wherever possible, classifications of medical conditions should be based on etiological aspects (etiological paradigm) or at least on pathophysiological aspects (pathophysiological paradigm). However, in view of scarce information on both pathophysiology and etiology of most psychiatric conditions, the phenomenological paradigm is still hegemonic in widely adopted international classifications such as American Psychiatric Association DSM-IV and World Health Organization ICD-10. Both ICD and DSM schemes are largely based on kraepelinian classifications of mental disorders, relying on observed symptomatology, course of illness, and outcome. Reliability of psychiatric diagnosis has significantly increased with introduction of operational diagnostic criteria in current classifications. However, diagnostic validity has not improved at all. Therefore, at least for clinical purposes, it is critical that phenomenologically-oriented classifications have practical implications, especially for instructing clinicians about most appropriate treatments for a given condition.

Various epidemiological studies have demonstrated that some of the most common comorbid disorders among individuals with bipolar disorder are the anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (lifetime prevalence of about 16%), especially among those with earlier onset of bipolar disorder1,2. In addition, different studies have suggested that this finding has important clinical implications, since the presence of comorbid anxiety disorders negatively affects course, outcome, and treatment response in bipolar disorder3,4. Furthermore, different studies have suggested that comorbid anxiety is associated with poorer psychosocial functioning and lower overall quality of life1,2. Finally, different clinical trials have suggested that specific drugs such as divalproex and quetiapina are preferentially indicated when comorbid anxiety is present in bipolar disorder5.

In conclusion, although current mental disorders classifications are highly reliable, diagnostic validity is clearly unsatisfactory. Since disorder boundaries are not well established, it appears to be inappropriate a priori exclusion of generalized anxiety disorder as a possible comorbidity in bipolar disorder. This view is reinforced by empirical data from clinical studies suggesting that diagnosis of comorbid anxiety in BD has practical implications in clinical practice, including choice of treatment interventions.

 

References

1. Freeman MP, Freeman SA, McElroy SL. The comorbidity of bipolar and anxiety disorders: prevalence, psychobiology, and treatment issues. J Affect Disord. 2002;68(1):1-23.

2. Keller MB. Prevalence and impact of comorbid anxiety and bipolar disorder. J Clin Psychiatry. 2006;67(Suppl 1):5-7.

3. Masi G, Perugi G, Millepiedi S, Toni C, Mucci M, Bertini N, et al. Clinical and research implications of panic-bipolar comorbidity in children and adolescents. Psychiatry Res. 2007;153(1):47-54.

4. Del Bello MP, Hanseman D, Adler CM, Fleck DE, Strakowski SM. Twelve-month outcome of adolescents with bipolar disorder following first hospitalization for a manic or mixed episode. Am J Psychiatry. 2007;164(4):582-90.

5. Rakofsky JJ, Dunlop BW. Treating nonspecific anxiety and anxiety disorders in patients with bipolar disorder: a review. J Clin Psychiatry. 2011;72(1):81-90.

 


 

Andrea Feijo Mello, MD, PH.D.

Pós-doutoranda do Departamento de Psiquiatria da Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), médica responsável pelo Ambulatório de Estresse e Depressão do Prove (Programa de Atendimento e Pesquisa em Violência da Unifesp), São Paulo, SP, Brasil

 

 

Clinical and psychiatric comorbidities are frequently present in bipolar patients. The STEP-BD data showed that 58.8% of the subjects evaluated presented clinical comorbidities and also that a lifetime diagnosis of anxiety disorders and substance abuse disorder increased the risk for clinical illnesses1. So not making a diagnosis of anxiety disorder and not treating the symptoms related to it in bipolar patients could worsen their health across the lifespan.

Many patients have anxiety disorders previous to the development of bipolar symptoms but many others could develop anxiety, panic, obssessive compulsive, eating disorders symptoms after receiving a bipolar disorder (BD) diagnosis, not even mentioning a more complicated association between trauma, PTSD and BD.

The association of so many symptoms in the same individual makes it very complex to give a right diagnosis and to propose an adequate treatment. The DSM-V will propose more categories, with obssessive compulsive spectrum and trauma related disorders apart from the anxiety disorders chapter2, what can unfortunately increase the difficult to categorize patients with symptoms related to different nosological disorders.

Patients that receive a manualized diagnosis of BD could not receive a diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) as a comorbidity, although it seems to be inadequate since it is well known that they can have symptoms for both diagnosis, it can avoid prescribing antidepressants, that are the first line of treatment for GAD. Giving antidepressants to the majority of BD patients is not beneficial, it can even be harmfull leading to rapid cycling or mood swings3.

Treating first the BD and reaching stability could be sufficient to diminish anxiety symptoms, nevertheless for the patients that still have anxiety symptoms after being stabilized it will be necessary to individualize the pharmacological approach.

Some patients could benefit from antidepressants but always associated with mood stabilizers, others will not receive this recomendation because of a hystory of rapid cycling or bipolarity more prone to manic episodes4.

Treating BD patients with comorbidities is a challenge and a rationale has to be created for each case. More studies are necessary to increase our knowledge on how to benefit a bigger number of individuals whith such complex comorbidities.

 

References

1. Magalhães PV, Kapczinski F, Nierenberg AA, Deckersbach T, Weisinger D, Dodd S, et al. Illness burden and medical comorbidity in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder. Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012;125(4):303-8.

2. DSM-V Development [database on the Internet]2012. Available from: http://www.dsm5.org/Pages/Default.aspx.

3. Valenti M, Pacchiarotti I, Bonnin CM, Rosa AR, Popovic D, Nivoli AM, et al. Risk factors for antidepressant-related switch to mania. J Clin Psychiatry. 2012;73(2):e271-6.

4. Undurraga J, Baldessarini RJ, Valenti M, Pacchiarotti I, Tondo L, Vazquez G, et al. Bipolar depression: clinical correlates of receiving antidepressants. J Affect Disord. 2012.

 


 

Vasco Videira Dias

Professor do Departamento de Psiquiatria da Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

 

 

The authors discuss critically a present and pertinent topic that affects a large range of bipolar disorder's patients. The high levels of incidence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in bipolar patients suggest that GAD is a commonly observed comorbid entity. If we imagine a rat trained to press a lever to avoid a mild shock, the anticipation of mastery might activate pleasurable dopamine release to the frontal cortex. If the lever is disconnected, however, so that pressing it no longer prevents shocks, the rat will frantically press the lever repeatedly, attempting to gain control. This is the essence of anxiety, characterized mainly by adrenaline and norepinephrine secretion and to a lesser extent by cortisol production. As the shocks continue and the rat finds its attempts at coping useless, a transition occurs where cortisol dominates and key neurotransmitters are depleted. In my opinion, GAD is a subsyndromal comorbid feature and it seems to be a feature associated with bipolar disorder as a consequence of a general dysfunction in specific mechanisms associated with neurotransmitters. In this sense, GAD approach in bipolar disorder's patients should raise an integrated and global treatment.

 


 

Doris Hupfeld Moreno

Mood Disorders Unit (Gruda), Department and Institute of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Gruda IPq-FMUSP, Brazil

 

 

Important questions were raised referring to the letter about the association between bipolar disorder (BD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). In fact, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR, 2000) excludes the possibility of a comorbid diagnosis, considering a relict of DSM-III, which remained in the subsequent editions1.

Normally, epidemiological and clinical studies which aim to determine comorbidities between psychiatric disorders or syndromes disregard the diagnostic hierarchy and thus, generate prevalences as observed by the author of the letter. In the 5th edition of the DSM (DSM-V)2, which will be launched in 2013, the number of associated symptoms will decrease from six to two and the minimum duration of current symptoms from six to three months; the diagnosis will center on excessive anxiety and worry in two or more spheres of life1. However, the diagnostic hierarchy will be retained, and GAD cannot be due to another mental disorder. Furthermore, as the DSM-V will include the specifier "with anxiety" for depressive disorders because of the impact of anxiety on morbidity and mortality rates of mood disorders in general, the diagnosis has to be distinguished from depressive disorders3.

Goodwin and Jamison (2007)4 did not mention GAD as a comorbidity of BD. They consider that subsyndromal anxiety symptoms were frequent and influence the course and progression of BD, being associated with an increased risk of suicide, substance abuse, and worse response to treatment, and thus, were part of the problem, not another diagnosis. One hundred years ago, Kraepelin already described, that in case of a good course the MDI [manic-depressive insanity] was free form symptoms of anxiety, and that patterns which are more difficult to treat, especially mixed episodes, often showed anxiety symptoms of significant intensity.

Swann et al. (2009)5 showed that psychopathology changed when a depressive episode of BD was superimposed by at least one manic symptom (e.g., racing thoughts) and a manic episode by at least two depressive symptoms, since anxiety emerged and symptoms worsened. Suicide attempts occurred in manias with at least three depressive symptoms and in depressions superimposed by at least two manic symptoms. This study was essential for the inclusion of the specifier "with mixed features" in all episodes of mood disorders in the DSM-V, whether bipolar or not. In addition to anxiety, which is predominant in relation to euphoric or depressive mood, dysphoria (defined by internal tension, irritability, aggressive behavior, and hostility) also emerged as a distinct phenomenology among bipolar inpatients that showed mania with at least three depressive symptoms or depression with at least one manic symptom6. Therefore, one could confuse GAD with a depressive mixed state, in which racing thoughts result in exaggerated worrying and anticipated suffering, irritability, and important anxiety, but does not configure a depressive episode. According to Goodwin and Jamison (2007, p. 78-79), "symptomatic presentations of mixed states range from a single opposite-state symptom found in the midst of an otherwise 'pure' manic or depressive syndrome (such as depressed mood during mania or racing thoughts during depression) to more complex mixes of mood, thought, and behavior".

BD has a fluctuating course with syndromic, subsyndromic and euthymic periods. As definitions of euthymia vary from one study to another and as a function of the threshold used for its determination, the results are inconsistent7. In the mentioned article, patients were considered euthymic if they had a HAM-D score of < 8 and a YMRS score of < 6 for at least two months, and thus, they were neither asymptomatic nor did they have only one or two mild symptoms8. The authors ignored the diagnostic hierarchy, but did not discuss the problem.

On the other hand, if one separates subjects of the depressive and the bipolar spectrum from normal controls, comorbidity with GAD becomes questionable. In a study about the use of antidepressants (ADs) among an Italian general population sample with subsyndromal depression (SSD), use of ADs was only found in subjects with SSD who were considered bipolar by the Bipolar Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ), but was due to the comorbidity with panic syndrome (PS) or GAD, as the diagnosis of PS and GAD were strictly associated with positive MDQ9. A Brazilian epidemiological study, in which the diagnostic hierarchy was disregarded, bipolar spectrum (BS) was compared with non-affective controls (which could present other disorders in a pure form). Lifetime prevalence of GAD in BS ranged from 5.6% to 35.6%, but was only 0.5% among non-affective controls10. A latent class analysis of all affective symptoms among the same sample showed that GAD was the only anxiety disorder with zero prevalence in the class labeled as "euthymics"11.

Studies which clearly distinguish between GAD and BD are still limited, especially because research about the distinctive phenomenology of mixed states are recent and few, replicating the work of Kraepelin and Weygandt. The importance of the presence of anxiety symptoms results from the poor prognosis and chronicity of BD, but it is possible that mixed symptoms mediate the onset of anxiety and the associated risk of suicide. Future studies will determine whether the proposed new definition of GAD in the DSM-V facilitates the distinction, improving the knowledge about the clinical significance of comorbidity with BD.

 

References

1. Andrews G, Hobbs MJ, Borkovec TD, Beesdo K, Craske MG, Heimberg RG, et al. Generalized worry disorder: a review of DSM-IV generalized anxiety disorder and options for DSM-V. Depress Anxiety. 2010;27(2):134-47.

2. Available from: http://www.dsm5.org/proposedrevision/pages/anxietydisorders.aspx.

3. Goldberg D, Fawcett J. The importance of anxiety in both major depression and bipolar disorder. Depress Anxiety. 2012 May 2. doi: 10.1002/da.21939.

4. Goodwin FK, Jamison KR. Manic depressive illness. New York: Oxford University Press Inc.; 2007.

5. Swann AC, Steinberg JL, Lijffijt M, Moeller GF. Continuum of depressive and manic mixed states in patients with bipolar disorder: quantitative measurement and clinical features. World Psychiatry. 2009;8(3):166-72.

6. Bertschy G, Gervasoni N, Favre S, Liberek C, Ragama-Pardos E, Aubry JM, et al. Frequency of dysphoria and mixed states. Psychopathology. 2008;41(3):187-93.

7. De Dios C, Agud JL, Ezquiaga E, García-López A, Soler B, Vieta E. Syndromal and subsyndromal illness status and five-year morbidity using criteria of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders compared to alternative criteria. Psychopathology. 2012;45(2):102-8.

8. Albert U, Rosso G, Maina G, Boggeto F. Impact of anxiety disorder comorbidity on quality of life in euthymic bipolar disorder patients: differences between bipolar I and II subtypes. J Affect Disord. 2008;68:297-303.

9. Carta MG, Tondo L, Balestrieri M, Caraci F, Dell'osso L, Di Sciascio G, et al. Sub-threshold depression and antidepressants use in a community sample: searching anxiety and finding bipolar disorder. BMC Psychiatry. 2011;11:164.

10. Moreno DH. Prevalência e características do espectro bipolar em uma amostra populacional definida da cidade de São Paulo [tese]. Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo; 2004.

 


 

Giancarlo Lucca; Rafael E. Riegel; João Quevedo

Núcleo de Excelência em Neurociências Aplicadas de Santa Catarina (Nenasc), Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UESC), Criciúma, SC, Brazil

 

 

Through the last 20 years the interest concerning research integrating anxiety disorder and mood disorder comorbidities has been increased. Although, the amount of publications production are still bellow ideal to elucidate the doubts we have to deal with, regarding not only the diagnosis limitations but also the biological bases end it's treatments issues1.

Many studies proves how it is important to achieve the anxious comorbidity diagnoses in patients suffering of bipolar disorders for the negative impact that such a combination perform in both treatment and prognosis2-5.

The high comorbidity prevalence between GAD and BD found in the literature may at least partially attributed to a common neurobiological pathway present in both disorders or maybe caused by a current categorical psychiatry diagnoses effect that could sometimes share mutual symptoms in different class disorders blurring the clear definitions of the psychiatry disorders classification6.

As quoted by Provencher et al., a peper pending on DSM-5 could try to distinguish more accurately the psychiatry disorders, as has been done at the DSM-III and DSM-III-R time referring precisely to the classification of the anxious disorders in the 80's when distinct subtypes had been proposed.

The DSM-5, preliminarily, defines the anxious disorders as a specifier to describe mood episodes in bipolar disorder. Considering this change it will be possible to specify the bipolar disorder episode with mild or severe anxiety. Such a especifier could not be a new diagnosis category, but it could guide us on how far the bipolar disorder reaches the diagnosis frontiers in anxious disorder, especially GAD1.

 

References

1. Provencher MD, Guimond AJ, Hawke LD. Comorbid anxiety in bipolar spectrum disorders: a neglected research and treatment issue? J Affect Disord. 2012;137(1-3):161-4.

2. Issler CK, Sant'anna MK, Kapczinski F, Lafer B. Comorbidade com transtornos de ansiedade em transtorno bipolar. Rev Bras Psiquiatr. 2004;26(3):31-6.

3. McIntyre RS, Soczynska JK, Bottas A, Bordbar K, Konarski JZ, Kennedy SH. Anxiety disorders and bipolar disorder: a review. Bipolar Disord. 2006;8:665-76.

4. Krishnan KR. Psychiatric and medical comorbidities of bipolar disorder. Psychosom Med. 2005;67(1):1-8.

5. Saunders EF, Fitzgerald KD, Zhang P, McInnis MG. Clinical features of bipolar disorder comorbid with anxiety disorders differ between men and women. Depress Anxiety. 2012;27:1-8.

6. Goldberg D. A dimensional model for common mental disorders. Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 1996;(30):44-9.

 


 

Ricardo A. Moreno, MD, PH.D.

Director - Mood disorders Unit (Gruda), Department and Institute of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Gruda IPq-FMUSP, Brazil

 

 

The authors raise a broader and controversial question about the interface between anxiety disorders (AD) and bipolar disorder (BD), whose relationship is complex and requires several considerations. First, there is a high rate of comorbidity with AD in BD, as found by Andrade-Nascimento. Second, the higher prevalence rates of AD (including generalized anxiety disorder - GAD) found in offspring of individuals with BD (36%) compared with offspring of psychiatrically healthy controls (14%)1,2 suggest that AD can be an alternative pathway for the development of BD3. Third, the fact that the diagnostic of GAD remains the most provisional diagnostic among anxiety disorders because of diagnostic difficulty regarding to the definition of excessive and unreal worrying, which is affected by the influence of social class, culture, personality, values about what constitutes a real concern, and the symptoms themselves, which are overlapping with underlying symptoms of GAD and with symptoms of chronic insomnia like fatigue and irritability, which form part of the diagnosis and in turn are also symptoms of BD. Other aspects include the fact that the diagnosis of GAD based on the DSM-III-R has changed, allowing now diagnostic comorbidities, and thus, a high rate of comorbidities had to be identified (in some studies over 90% of patients with GAD showed one or more comorbidities)4. Against this background, I agree with Brown's statement (1994)5 that GAD would be better conceptualized as a trait or factor of vulnerability or even as a final common pathway for many psychiatric disorders, including BD. However, in clinical practice, the coexistence of more than one psychiatric disorder in an individual with BD influences the diagnostic process, the response to treatment, course and prognosis and requires better scientific evidence.

 

References

1. Henin A, Biederman J, Mick E, Sachs GS, Hirshfeld-Becker DR, Siegel RS, et al. Psychopathology in the offspring of parents with bipolar disorder: a controlled study. Biol Psychiatr. 2005;58(7):554-61.

2. Petresco S, Gutt EK, Krelling R, Lotufo-Neto F, Rohde LAP, Moreno RA. The prevalence of psychopathology in offspring of bipolar women from a Brazilian tertiary Center. Rev Bras Psiquiatr. 2009;31(3):240-6.

3. Chang K, Steiner H, Ketter T. Studies of offspring of parents with bipolar disorder. Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet. 2003;123C(1):26-35.

4. Witchen HU, Zhao S, Kessler RC, Eaton WW. DSM-III-R generalized anxiety disorder in the National Comorbidity Survey. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:355-64.

5. Brown TA, Barlow DH, Liebowitz MR. The empirical basis of generalized anxiety disorder. Am J Psychiatr. 1994;151:1272-80.

1. Issler CK, Sant'anna MK, Kapczinski F, Lafer B. Comorbidade com transtornos de ansiedade em transtorno bipolar. Rev Bras Psiquiatr. 2004;26(3):31-6.         [ Links ]

2. Goodwin FK, Jamison KR. Maniac depressive illness. New York: Oxford University Press Inc.; 2007.         [ Links ]

3. Vieta E, Colom F, Corbella B, Martinez-Aran A, Reinares M, Benabarre A, et al. Clinical correlates of psychiatric comorbidity in bipolar I patients. Bipolar Disord. 2001;3:253-8.         [ Links ]

4. McIntyre RS, Soczynska JK, Bottas A, Bordbar K, Konarski JZ, Kennedy SH. Anxiety disorders and bipolar disorder: a review. Bipolar Disord. 2006;8:665-76.         [ Links ]

5. Albert U, Rosso G, Maina G, Boggeto F. Impact of anxiety disorder comorbidity on quality of life in euthimic bipolar disorder patients: differences between bipolar I and II subtypes. J Affect Disord. 2008;68:297-303.         [ Links ]

 

 

Endereço para correspondência:
Monica Andrade-Nascimento
Hospital Universitário Professor Edgard Santos
Serviço de Psiquiatria
40110-909 Salvador, BA
E-mail: monica@uefs.br

 


 

Comentários sobre a carta ao editor

 

Re: Transtorno bipolar em comorbidade com transtorno de ansiedade generalizada: um diagnóstico possível?

 

 

Acioly L. T. Lacerda, MD, PH.D.

Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas (LiNC), Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP, Brasil

 

 

Sempre que possível, as classificações de doenças devem ser baseadas em aspectos etiológicos (paradigma etiológico) ou pelo menos em aspectos fisiopatológicos (paradigma fisiopatológico). Porém, por causa da disponibilidade limitada de informações tanto etiológicas quanto fisiopatológicas para a maioria dos transtornos psiquiátricos, o paradigma fenomenológico ainda é hegemônico em classificações internacionalmente aceitas, tais como o DSM-IV da Associação Americana de Psiquiatria e a CID-10 da Organização Mundial de Saúde. Os esquemas de ambos, DSM-IV e CID-10, são fortemente influenciados pelas classificações kraepelinianas dos transtornos mentais, baseando-se na sintomatologia observada, curso da doença e prognóstico. A confiabilidade do diagnóstico psiquiátrico melhorou significativamente com a introdução de critérios diagnósticos operacionais nas classificações atualmente adotadas. Porém, a validade diagnóstica não apresentou qualquer avanço. Desse modo, pelo menos para propósitos clínicos, é fundamental que classificações fenomenologicamente orientadas apresentem implicações práticas, especialmente para orientar o psiquiatra acerca dos tratamentos mais apropriados para uma determinada patologia.

Vários estudos epidemiológicos têm demonstrado que os transtornos de ansiedade, incluindo o transtorno de ansiedade generalizada (prevalência ao longo da vida de cerca de 16%), estão entre as comorbidades mais frequentes em indivíduos com diagnóstico de transtorno afetivo bipolar1,2. Adicionalmente, diferentes estudos têm sugerido que esse achado apresenta importantes implicações clínicas, visto que a presença de transtornos de ansiedade comórbidos afeta negativamente o curso, o prognóstico e a resposta ao tratamento do transtorno afetivo bipolar3,4. Ainda, diferentes estudos também têm sugerido que a ansiedade comórbida está associada a um maior prejuízo no funcionamento psicossocial e a uma pior qualidade de vida em indivíduos com transtorno afetivo bipolar1,2. Por fim, diversos ensaios clínicos têm sugerido que medicamentos específicos tais como divalproato e quetiapina são preferencialmente indicados quando ansiedade comórbida é diagnosticada no transtorno afetivo bipolar5.

Concluindo, embora as classificações de transtornos mentais vigentes sejam altamente confiáveis, a validade diagnóstica é claramente insatisfatória. Visto que as fronteiras diagnósticas dos transtornos psiquiátricos não se encontram bem estabelecidas, parece ser inapropriada a exclusão a priori do transtorno de ansiedade generalizada com uma possível comorbidade no transtorno afetivo bipolar. Essa visão é reforçada por dados empíricos de estudos clínicos sugerindo que o diagnóstico de ansiedade comórbida no transtorno afetivo bipolar apresenta implicações para a prática clínica, incluindo a escolha de intervenções mais apropriadas.

 

Referências

1. Freeman MP, Freeman SA, McElroy SL. The comorbidity of bipolar and anxiety disorders: prevalence, psychobiology, and treatment issues. J Affect Disord. 2002;68(1):1-23.         [ Links ]

2. Keller MB. Prevalence and impact of comorbid anxiety and bipolar disorder. J Clin Psychiatry. 2006;67(Suppl 1):5-7.         [ Links ]

3. Masi G, Perugi G, Millepiedi S, Toni C, Mucci M, Bertini N, et al. Clinical and research implications of panic-bipolar comorbidity in children and adolescents. Psychiatry Res. 2007;153(1):47-54.         [ Links ]

4. Del Bello MP, Hanseman D, Adler CM, Fleck DE, Strakowski SM. Twelve-month outcome of adolescents with bipolar disorder following first hospitalization for a manic or mixed episode. Am J Psychiatry. 2007;164(4):582-90.         [ Links ]

5. Rakofsky JJ, Dunlop BW. Treating nonspecific anxiety and anxiety disorders in patients with bipolar disorder: a review. J Clin Psychiatry. 2011;72(1):81-90.         [ Links ]

 


 

Andrea Feijo Mello, MD, PH.D.

Pós-doutoranda do Departamento de Psiquiatria da Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), médica responsável pelo Ambulatório de Estresse e Depressão do Prove (Programa de Atendimento e Pesquisa em Violência da Unifesp), São Paulo, SP, Brasil

 

 

O transtorno bipolar (TB) é frequentemente acompanhado de comorbidades, tanto clínicas quanto psiquiátricas. Os dados do STEP-BP mostraram que 58,8% dos pacientes avaliados tinham comorbidades clínicas e que ter diagnóstico de transtorno de ansiedade e abuso de substâncias ao longo da vida estava associado ao fato de o indivíduo ter mais doenças clínicas1.

Assim, não fazer o diagnóstico de transtornos de ansiedade nesses pacientes e deixar de tratá-los pode piorar a saúde do indivíduo.

Uma parcela dos indivíduos portadores de TB e quadros ansiosos associados tem sintomas de quadros comórbidos prévios ao diagnóstico de TB, entretanto outros passam a apresentar sintomas de ansiedade, pânico ou sintomas do espectro obsessivo-compulsivo ou mesmo alimentares após esse diagnóstico, sem considerar a complexa associação entre trauma, transtorno de estresse pós-traumático e TB.

Isso pode realmente levar a uma dificuldade em delimitar o diagnóstico correto e consequentemente na proposta de tratamento. No DSM-V teremos, ainda, novas categorias para os transtornos do espectro obsessivo-compulsivo e os transtornos ligados ao trauma2, o que pode vir a complicar mais a formulação de diagnósticos em pacientes com sintomas pertencentes a diversos quadros nosológicos.

O fato de os manuais não permitirem que seja feito o diagnóstico de transtorno de ansiedade generalizada em pacientes portadores de TB deve-se, em grande parte, ao conhecimento de que a maioria dos pacientes bipolares não obtém benefício com o uso de antidepressivos ou mesmo tem prejuízo com eles, como a ciclagem ou viragem para mania3. Esse conhecimento nos leva a pensar como tratar desses casos, já que os quadros ansiosos têm nas drogas antidepressivas sua primeira linha de tratamento.

Partindo desse ponto ao se elencarem prioridades e se tratar primeiro o TB, em diversos casos a melhora de sintomas ansiosos ocorrerá assim que o quadro estiver compensado. Entretanto, naqueles casos em que os sintomas ansiosos persistirem, deverá ser criada uma estratégia de associações medicamentosas de modo individualizado.

Alguns pacientes poderão se beneficiar do uso de antidepressivos se devidamente protegidos com estabilizadores do humor, outros terão estes contraindicados, como nos casos de cicladores rápidos ou daqueles que tiverem uma polaridade do transtorno bipolar mais para mania4.

Os critérios diagnósticos estão sendo revisados com perspectivas de que os pesquisadores possam cada vez mais estudar uniformemente os quadros mais complexos, porém ainda são necessários mais estudos em casos de transtornos comórbidos, porque não basta simplesmente somar o tratamento proposto para cada uma das comorbidades, mas, sim, criar um racional direcionado que possa levar à melhora de um número cada vez maior de pacientes.

 

Referências

1. Magalhães PV, Kapczinski F, Nierenberg AA, Deckersbach T, Weisinger D, Dodd S, et al. Illness burden and medical comorbidity in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder. Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012;125(4):303-8.         [ Links ]

2. DSM-V Development [database on the Internet]2012. Available from: http://www.dsm5.org/Pages/Default.aspx.

3. Valenti M, Pacchiarotti I, Bonnin CM, Rosa AR, Popovic D, Nivoli AM, et al. Risk factors for antidepressant-related switch to mania. J Clin Psychiatry. 2012;73(2):e271-6.         [ Links ]

4. Undurraga J, Baldessarini RJ, Valenti M, Pacchiarotti I, Tondo L, Vazquez G, et al. Bipolar depression: clinical correlates of receiving antidepressants. J Affect Disord. 2012.         [ Links ]

 


 

Vasco Videira Dias

Professor do Departamento de Psiquiatria da Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

 

 

Os autores discutem criticamente um tópico atual e pertinente que afeta uma ampla gama de pacientes com transtorno bipolar (TAB). A alta incidência de transtorno de ansiedade generalizada (TAG) em pacientes bipolares sugere que o TAG é uma entidade comórbida comumente observada no TAB. Se imaginarmos um rato treinado para apertar um botão e evitar um choque leve, a antecipação do comando pode ativar liberação prazerosa de dopamina no córtex frontal. Se o botão for desconectado, entretanto, pressionar o botão não prevenirá o choque, e o rato pressionará frenética e repetidamente o botão, tentando ganhar controle sobre a situação. Essa é a essência da ansiedade, caracterizada especialmente pela secreção de adrenalina e noradrenalina e, em menor grau, pela secreção de cortisol. Se os choques continuarem e o animal tiver suas tentativas de lidar com isso sem resultado, uma transição ocorrerá quando o cortisol aumentar e ocorrerá depleção dos principais neurotransmissores. Em minha opinião, o TAG é um quadro comórbido subsindrômico e parece ser uma característica associada ao TAB como consequência de disfunção geral de mecanismos associados à neurotransmissão. Nesse sentido, em relação à abordagem de TAG em pacientes com TAB, deve-se incluir também uma visão integrada quanto ao tratamento.

 


 

Doris Hupfeld Moreno

Mood Disorders Unit (Gruda), Department and Institute of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Gruda IPq-FMUSP, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.

 

 

Referente à carta sobre a associação entre o transtorno bipolar (TB) e o de ansiedade generalizada (TAG), importantes questionamentos foram levantados. De fato, o Manual Diagnóstico e Estatístico de Transtornos Mentais (DSM-IV-TR, 2000) exclui a possibilidade do diagnóstico comórbido, considerado um resquício do DSM-III que se manteve nas edições subsequentes1. Via de regra, em estudos epidemiológicos e clínicos que visam determinar comorbidades entre transtornos ou síndromes psiquiátricas, a hierarquia diagnóstica é abandonada, gerando prevalências como as observadas pela autora da carta. Na 5ª edição do DSM (DSM-V)2, a ser lançada em 2013, o número de sintomas associados passará de seis para dois e a duração mínima dos atuais seis para três meses; o diagnóstico se centralizará em torno do excesso de ansiedade e preocupação em duas ou mais esferas da vida1. Entretanto, o diagnóstico não poderá dever-se a outro transtorno mental - obedecendo à hierarquia diagnóstica -, sendo preciso distinguir-se dos transtornos depressivos, uma vez que o DSM-V incluirá o especificador "com ansiedade" no transtorno depressivo, devido ao impacto da ansiedade sobre a morbimortalidade dos transtornos do humor em geral3.

Goodwin e Jamison (2007)4 não mencionaram o TAG como comorbidade do TB porque consideraram que sintomas ansiosos subsindrômicos são frequentes e influem no curso e na evolução do TB, ao se associarem a maiores riscos de suicídio, abuso de substâncias e pior resposta ao tratamento, e portanto seriam parte do problema, não outro diagnóstico. Cem anos atrás, Kraepelin já descrevera que "a PMD [psicose maníaco-depressiva] de boa evolução cursava livre de sintomas de ansiedade" e que "quadros de mais difícil manejo, em especial episódios mistos, apresentavam frequentemente sintomas ansiosos de intensidade significativa" (apud Goodwin e Jamison, 2007).

Swann et al. (2009)5 demonstraram que a psicopatologia mudava quando um episódio depressivo do TB era superposto a, no mínimo, um sintoma maníaco (por exemplo, aceleração de pensamentos) e uma mania a pelo menos dois sintomas depressivos - o que apareceu foi ansiedade e agravamento dos sintomas; as tentativas de suicídio ocorreram nas manias com pelo menos três sintomas depressivos e nas depressões com pelo menos dois sintomas maníacos superpostos. Esse estudo foi fundamental para a inclusão do especificador "com sintomas mistos" em todos os episódios de transtornos do humor do DSM-V, bipolares ou não. Além da ansiedade, preponderante em relação ao humor eufórico ou depressivo, a disforia (definida por tensão interna, irritabilidade, comportamento agressivo e hostilidade) também emergiu como fenomenologia distinta em bipolares internados que tinham mania com pelo menos três sintomas depressivos ou depressão com pelo menos um sintoma maníaco6. Portanto, seria possível confundir o TAG com um estado misto depressivo, no qual a aceleração de pensamentos resultaria em precocupações exageradas e com sofrimento antecipado, irritabilidade e ansiedade acentuada, mas que não configurariam um episódio depressivo. Segundo Goodwin e Jamison (2007, p. 78-79)4, "apresentações sintomáticas dos sintomas mistos variam de um único sintoma do polo oposto encontrado em uma síndrome maníaca ou depressiva de outro modo considerada 'pura' (como humor depressivo durante a mania ou aceleração de pensamentos durante a depressão) até misturas mais complexas de humor, pensamento e comportamento".

O TB possui um curso flutuante entre períodos sindrômicos, subsindrômicos e eutímicos. As definições de eutimia variam de um estudo a outro e, dependendo da linha de corte utilizada para sua determinação, diferentes serão os resultados7. No artigo mencionado, os pacientes não estavam assintomáticos ou com apenas um ou dois sintomas leves, pois foram considerados eutímicos se tivessem escores < 8 na HAM-D e < 6 pela YMRS durante pelo menos dois meses8. Os autores deixaram de lado a hierarquização diagnóstica, mas não discutiram o problema.

Por outro lado, quando se separam sujeitos do espectro depressivo ou bipolar de controles normais, a comorbidade com TAG se torna questionável. Estudando o uso de antidepressivos (ADs) numa amostra da população geral italiana com depressão subsindrômica (DS), encontrou-se uso de ADs somente nos sujeitos DS que foram considerados bipolares pelo Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ), mas por conta da comorbidade com síndrome do pânico (SP) ou TAG, e os diagnósticos de SP e TAG estavam estritamente associados ao MDQ positivo9. Em estudo epidemiológico do nosso meio, no qual se abandonou a hierarquia diagnóstica, comparou-se o espectro bipolar (ETB) com controles não afetivos (CNA, que poderiam apresentar os outros distúrbios na forma pura), e a prevalência do TAG durante a vida no ETB variou de 5,6% a 35,6%, mas caiu para 0,5% nos CNA10. Aplicando-se uma análise de classes latentes aos sintomas afetivos desta mesma amostra, verificou-se que o TAG foi o único transtorno ansioso de prevalência zero na classe denominada "eutímicos"11.

Ainda faltam estudos que delimitem claramente o TB do TAG, mormente pelo fato de serem recentes e poucas as investigações acerca da fenomenologia distinta dos estados mistos, resgatando o trabalho de Kraepelin e Weygandt. A relevância da presença de sintomas ansiosos reside no pior prognóstico e cronicidade do TB, mas é possível que os sintomas mistos medeiem o aparecimento da ansiedade e do risco de suicídio associado. Futuros estudos determinarão se a nova definição do TAG proposta no DSM-V facilitará a distinção, aperfeiçoando o conhecimento sobre o significado clínico da comorbidade com o TB.

 

Referências

1. Andrews G, Hobbs MJ, Borkovec TD, Beesdo K, Craske MG, Heimberg RG, et al. Generalized worry disorder: a review of DSM-IV generalized anxiety disorder and options for DSM-V. Depress Anxiety. 2010;27(2):134-47.         [ Links ]

2. Available from: http://www.dsm5.org/proposedrevision/pages/anxietydisorders.aspx.         [ Links ]

3. Goldberg D, Fawcett J. The importance of anxiety in both major depression and bipolar disorder. Depress Anxiety. 2012 May 2. doi: 10.1002/da.21939.         [ Links ]

4. Goodwin FK, Jamison KR. Manic depressive illness. New York: Oxford University Press Inc.; 2007.         [ Links ]

5. Swann AC, Steinberg JL, Lijffijt M, Moeller GF. Continuum of depressive and manic mixed states in patients with bipolar disorder: quantitative measurement and clinical features. World Psychiatry. 2009;8(3):166-72.         [ Links ]

6. Bertschy G, Gervasoni N, Favre S, Liberek C, Ragama-Pardos E, Aubry JM, et al. Frequency of dysphoria and mixed states. Psychopathology. 2008;41(3):187-93.         [ Links ]

7. De Dios C, Agud JL, Ezquiaga E, García-López A, Soler B, Vieta E. Syndromal and subsyndromal illness status and five-year morbidity using criteria of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders compared to alternative criteria. Psychopathology. 2012;45(2):102-8.         [ Links ]

8. Albert U, Rosso G, Maina G, Boggeto F. Impact of anxiety disorder comorbidity on quality of life in euthymic bipolar disorder patients: differences between bipolar I and II subtypes. J Affect Disord. 2008;68:297-303.         [ Links ]

9. Carta MG, Tondo L, Balestrieri M, Caraci F, Dell'osso L, Di Sciascio G, et al. Sub-threshold depression and antidepressants use in a community sample: searching anxiety and finding bipolar disorder. BMC Psychiatry. 2011;11:164.         [ Links ]

10. Moreno DH. Prevalência e características do espectro bipolar em uma amostra populacional definida da cidade de São Paulo [tese]. Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo; 2004.         [ Links ]

 


 

Giancarlo Lucca; Rafael E. Riegel; João Quevedo

Núcleo de Excelência em Neurociências Aplicadas de Santa Catarina (Nenasc), Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (Unesc), Criciúma, SC, Brasil

 

 

No decorrer dos últimos 20 anos, o interesse pela pesquisa da comorbidade entre ansiedade e transtorno de humor bipolar vem aumentando. Entretanto, o número de publicações ainda está muito abaixo do ideal para elucidarmos as dúvidas que nos são impostas no que diz respeito não somente aos limites diagnósticos, mas também às bases biológicas e seus tratamentos1.

Diversos estudos evidenciam a importância de realizar o diagnóstico de comorbidade dos transtornos ansiosos em pacientes bipolares pelo impacto negativo que essa interação exerce no tratamento e no prognóstico2-5.

A alta prevalência de comorbidade entre ansiedade generalizada e transtorno bipolar encontrada nos artigos pode ser em parte atribuída a uma base neurobiológica comum entre os transtornos ou devida a um artefato resultante da classificação categorial empregada atualmente em psiquiatria, pois divide os sintomas psiquiátricos em classes separadas que em muitos casos se sobrepõem borrando os limites diagnósticos dos transtornos mentais6.

Conforme alerta Provencher et al., a publicação pendente do DSM-5 poderia tentar diferenciar mais esses transtornos entre si como fez o lançamento do DSM-III e do DSM-III-R com os transtornos de ansiedade nos anos 1980, propondo distintos subtipos para os transtornos de ansiedade. No DSM-5 preliminar, a ansiedade foi introduzida como um especificador para descrever episódios de humor nos transtornos bipolares (www.dsm5.org). Com essa mudança, será possível especificar o transtorno de humor bipolar com ansiedade leve a severa. Mesmo que esse especificador não seja uma nova categoria diagnóstica, ele mostra o quanto o transtorno de humor bipolar atinge a fronteira diagnóstica dos transtornos de ansiedade e, em especial, o transtorno de ansiedade generalizada1.

 

Referências

1. Provencher MD, Guimond AJ, Hawke LD. Comorbid anxiety in bipolar spectrum disorders: a neglected research and treatment issue? J Affect Disord. 2012;137(1-3):161-4.         [ Links ]

2. Issler CK, Sant'anna MK, Kapczinski F, Lafer B. Comorbidade com transtornos de ansiedade em transtorno bipolar. Rev Bras Psiquiatr. 2004;26(3):31-6.         [ Links ]

3. McIntyre RS, Soczynska JK, Bottas A, Bordbar K, Konarski JZ, Kennedy SH. Anxiety disorders and bipolar disorder: a review. Bipolar Disord. 2006;8:665-76.         [ Links ]

4. Krishnan KR. Psychiatric and medical comorbidities of bipolar disorder. Psychosom Med. 2005;67(1):1-8.         [ Links ]

5. Saunders EF, Fitzgerald KD, Zhang P, McInnis MG. Clinical features of bipolar disorder comorbid with anxiety disorders differ between men and women. Depress Anxiety. 2012;27:1-8.         [ Links ]

6. Goldberg D. A dimensional model for common mental disorders. Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 1996;(30):44-9.         [ Links ]

 


 

Ricardo A. Moreno

Mood Disorders Unit (GRUDA), Department and Institute of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, GRUDA IPq-FMUSP, Sao Paulo, SP, Brasil

 

 

Os autores levantam uma questão polêmica e mais ampla, qual seja a interface entre transtornos de ansiedade (TA) e transtorno bipolar (TB), cuja relação é complexa e requer várias considerações. Primeiro, a elevada taxa de comorbidade com TA encontrada no TB como citado por Andrade-Nascimento; segundo, a elevada prevalência de TA (incluindo transtorno de ansiedade generalizada - TAG) encontrada em filhos de bipolares (36%) comparada com as taxas de filhos de controles psiquiatricamente sadios (14%)1,2, sugerindo que o TA possa ser uma via alternativa para o desenvolvimento de TB3; terceiro, o fato de o diagnóstico de TAG permanecer como o mais provisional dos TA por causa da dificuldade diagnóstica relacionada com a definição de preocupações excessivas e irreais que sofre influência de classes sociais, cultura, personalidade e valores acerca do que constitui uma verdadeira preocupação e a própria clínica da síndrome, na qual há sobreposição de sintomas subjacentes ao TAG e os decorrentes da insônia crônica como fadiga e irritabilidade, que fazem parte do diagnóstico e, por sua vez, também são sintomas observados no TB. Outros aspectos incluem o fato de que, a partir da DSM-III-R, o diagnóstico de TAG mudou, permitindo comorbidades diagnósticas e, assim, uma grande taxa de comorbidades psiquiátricas passou a ser identificada (em alguns estudos mais de 90% dos pacientes com TAG apresentavam uma ou mais comorbidades)4. Nesse contexto, concordo com a citação de Brown et al. (1994)5 de que o TAG seria mais bem conceituado como traço ou fator de vulnerabilidade ou, ainda, uma via final comum para numerosos transtornos psiquiátricos, incluindo o TB. Entretanto, a importância prática da coexistência de mais de um transtorno psiquiátrico no mesmo indivíduo com TB sabidamente influencia o processo diagnóstico, a resposta a tratamento, o curso e o prognóstico e requer de melhor elucidação científica.

 

Referências

1. Henin A, Biederman J, Mick E, Sachs GS, Hirshfeld-Becker DR, Siegel RS, et al. Psychopathology in the offspring of parents with bipolar disorder: a controlled study. Biol Psychiatr. 2005;58(7):554-61.         [ Links ]

2. Petresco S, Gutt EK, Krelling R, Lotufo-Neto F, Rohde LAP, Moreno RA. The prevalence of psychopathology in offspring of bipolar women from a Brazilian tertiary Center. Rev Bras Psiquiatr. 2009;31(3):240-6.         [ Links ]

3. Chang K, Steiner H, Ketter T. Studies of offspring of parents with bipolar disorder. Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet. 2003;123C(1):26-35.         [ Links ]

4. Witchen HU, Zhao S, Kessler RC, Eaton WW. DSM-III-R generalized anxiety disorder in the National Comorbidity Survey. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:355-64.         [ Links ]

5. Brown TA, Barlow DH, Liebowitz MR. The empirical basis of generalized anxiety disorder. Am J Psychiatr. 1994;151:1272-80.         [ Links ]