SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.2 issue1INFLUENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND HANDLING PROCEDURES ON NATURAL MATING OF AFRICANIZED HONEYBEE QUEENS (Apis mellifera L.) ( HYMENOPTERA, APIDAE) author indexsubject indexarticles search
Home Pagealphabetic serial listing  

Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins

version ISSN 0104-7930

J. Venom. Anim. Toxins vol. 2 n. 1 Botucatu  1996

http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0104-79301996000100011 

THESIS: J. P. M. G. Barnet submitted this dissertation for the degree of Doctor in Biological Sciences (Zoology) publicly examined at the Institute of Biosciences of Rio Claro - UNESP, São Paulo State University, Brazil, in 1995.

Advisor: Professor José Chaud-Netto

 

 

ABSTRACT. Features of drones descended from honeybee queens and workers reared in drone or worker brood cells were compared. These comparisons were based on external morphological traits and characters of the reproductive tract of 1-day old and 10-day old drones. The data were analyzed using nonparametric tests and cluster analysis. The augmented size of brood cells significantly increased external traits. The drones were grouped according to brood cell type, not according to mother type. Traits of the reproductive tract of 10-day old drones showed a significant relation to comb cell type. The number of sperms produced by males descended from queens reared in drone brood cells was higher than that registered in males descended from workers and in drones descended from queens or workers reared in worker brood cells. Comb cell size has apparently exerted a mechanical effect on body size, regulating the expression of morphological traits. In regard to internal morphological traits, the variations observed between 1-day old and 10-day old drones, detected in different groups, might be the result of drone body size rather than brood cell size since the 10-day old drones were grouped according to cell size, while the 1-day old ones were not. The higher sperm production in males descended from queens reared in drone brood cells might be determined by both maternal characteristics and comb cell size.

 

 

 CORRESPONDENCE TO:
J. P. M. G. BARNET - Departamento de Biologia, Instituto de Biociências - UNESP - Caixa Postal 199, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brasil.