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Materials Research

Print version ISSN 1516-1439On-line version ISSN 1980-5373

Mat. Res. vol.20  supl.1 São Carlos  2017  Epub Oct 30, 2017

http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1980-5373-mr-2017-0298 

Articles

Complete Band Gaps in Nano-Piezoelectric Phononic Crystals

Edson Jansen Pedrosa de Miranda Jr.a  b  * 

José Maria Campos Dos Santosa 

aDepartamento de Mecânica Computacional - DMC, Universidade Estadual de Campinas - UNICAMP, Rua Mendeleyev, 200, CEP 13083-970, Campinas, SP, Brasil.

bDepartamento de Educação Profissional - DEP, Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Maranhão - IFMA, Rua Afonso Pena, 174, CEP 65010-030, São Luís, MA, Brasil.

ABSTRACT

We study the band structure of elastic waves propagating in a nano-piezoelectric phononic crystal consisting of a polymeric matrix reinforced by BaTiO3 inclusions in square, rectangular, triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices. We also investigate the influence of inclusion cross section geometry - circular, hollow circular, square and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to x and y axes. Plane wave expansion method is used to solve the governing equations of motion of a piezoelectric solid based on classical elasticity theory, ignoring nanoscopic size effects, considering two-dimensional periodicity and wave propagation in the xy plane. Complete band gaps between XY and Z modes are observed for all inclusions and the best performance is for circular inclusion in a triangular lattice. Piezoelectricity influences significantly the band gaps for hollow circular inclusion in lower frequencies. We suggest that nano-piezoelectric phononic crystals are feasible for elastic vibration management in GHz.

Keywords: nano-piezoelectric phononic crystal; band structure; plane wave expansion method; complete band gaps; vibration control

1. Introduction

Phononic crystals (PCs) are artificial periodic composites designed to exhibit phononic band gaps and they have been quite studied1-14. There are no mechanical (elastic or acoustic) propagating waves in phononic band gaps, only evanescent waves. These band gaps are created by the periodically mismatch between the constituent materials. This mismatch can be considered to arise either from difference of material properties or geometry (continuum-scale theory), or from interatomic force constants and masses (atomic-scale theory).

The ability of creating phononic band gaps is similar to the electronic and photonic band gaps in semiconductors and photonic crystals15-16, respectively. The physical origin of phononic and photonic band gaps can be understood at micro-scale using the classical wave theory to describe the Bragg and Mie resonances, respectively, based on the scattering of mechanical and electromagnetic waves propagating within the crystal17.

PCs have many applications, such as vibration isolation technology18-22, acoustic barriers/filters23-25, noise suppression devices26-27, surface acoustic devices28, architectural design29, sound shields30, acoustic diodes31, elastic metamaterials21-22,25,27,32 and thermal metamaterials33-39.

There are also smart PCs that have been studied, such as piezoelectric40-54, piezomagnetic55-58 and magnetoelectroelastic14,59-63 PCs. Among these intelligent PCs, piezoelectric PCs are sensitive to elastic and electric field. Even though the band structure behavior of piezoelectric PCs have been already investigated, to our knowledge only few studies46-49,51 focused on the influence of inclusion geometry and lattice on band gap formation. Wang and co-workers46 considered a piezoelectric PC with square lattice and different inclusion geometries (regular triangle, square, hexagon, circle and oval). They found that the largest complete band gap is obtained by selecting the inclusion with the same symmetry of lattice for the first band gap. Hsu et al.47 studied the band structure of a piezoelectric PC with square and triangular lattices using Mindlin-Reissner plate theory and considering only circular inclusion. Qian and co-workers48 studied the band structure of piezoelectric PCs with square lattice and circular and square inclusions. They revealed the existence of several very large complete band gaps in PZT rods reinforced polythene composite. Zhou et al.49 investigated the band structure of piezoelectric PCs consisting of rectangular inclusion in an epoxy substrate. They considered a PC with square and triangular lattices. Wang and co-workers51 considered a piezoelectric PC with circular inclusions and square and rectangular lattices. They verified that the largest band gap width is not always obtained for a square lattice. In some cases, rectangular lattice can produce broader gaps. In this context, we extend the studies about piezoelectric PCs40-54 considering the influence of different inclusion geometries - circular, hollow circular, square and rotated square with 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x and y axes, and different lattices - square, rectangular, triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé on the band structure.

Furthermore, researches have used PCs on the scale µm10,17,64,65 and mm, resulting in band gaps ranging from GHz and kHz to MHz, respectively. More recently, with the advance of nanomaterials fabrication, nanophononic crystals have been studied and it is possible to control wave propagation in a frequency range from hypersonic3-6,66-75 to thermal33-39. However, nano-piezoelectric PCs have not been investigated yet even though studies about nano-piezoelectric materials have been reported76-79.

The main purpose of this study is to investigate the elastic band structure, also known as dispersion relation, of a nano-piezoelectric phononic crystal with square, rectangular, triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices, composed by a polymeric matrix and BaTiO3 inclusions, considering wave propagation in the xy plane and two-dimensional periodicity. We consider the following inclusions geometries - circular, hollow circular, square and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x and y axes. To obtain the elastic band structure we use the semi-analytical plane wave expansion1,2 (PWE) method.

To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that the band structure of nano-piezoelectric PCs with different inclusion geometries and different lattices is investigated.

2. 2D Nano-Piezoelectric Phononic Crystal Model by PWE Method

PWE formulation of a 2D PC is presented in this section. PWE method1,2, also known as ω(k) method, is one of the most used methods to calculate the elastic band structure of PCs and it has been applied in micro10 and nanophononic crystals71,75 (NPCs). PWE method is used to solve the constitutive equations of a piezoelectric material based on classical elasticity theory, ignoring nanoscopic size effects, similar to other studies10,71,75.

We consider two-dimensional periodicity, transversely isotropic elastic solid and wave propagation in the xy plane. Complete band gaps between XY (longitudinal-transverse vibration) and Z (transverse vibration) modes are observed for all inclusion geometry - circular, hollow circular, square and rotated square, considering square, rectangular, triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices. Piezoelectric effect on the Z modes is also investigated.

2.1 2D Phononic Crystal Model

Figure 1 (a-e) sketches the cross section of nano-piezoelectric PC unit cells taking in to account square, rectangular, triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices, respectively, with arbitrary inclusion geometry. Figure 1 (f-h) represents the first Brillouin zone80 (FBZ) for square, rectangular, triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices. Note that triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices present the same FBZ shape (Figure 1 (h)). We consider four types of BaTiO3 inclusions: circular, hollow circular, square and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. We underline that only BaTiO3 inclusions are rotated for rotated square configuration, not the entire lattice.

Figure 1 Transverse cross-section of the nano-piezoelectric phononic crystal unit cell: BaTiO3 inclusions distributed in a polymeric matrix for square (a), rectangular (b), triangular (c), honeycomb (d) and Kagomé (e) lattices. First Brillouin zone for square (f), rectangular (g), triangular (h), honeycomb (h) and Kagomé (h) lattices. 

In addition, we highlight that we consider 1/4 of the FBZ as the actual first irreducible Brillouin zone80 (FIBZ) for square and rotated square inclusions in triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices because the symmetries of phononic crystals are reduced since the phononic crystal basis has different symmetry from the lattice81. Thus, for these configurations we scan M'-Γ-X-M-X'-M'. It is very important to make this adjustment since it changes the phononic crystal band structures81. For circular and hollow circular inclusions in triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices, phononic crystal symmetry is not reduced thus we scan only M-Γ-X-M.

FIBZ points in Figure 1 (f-h) are Γ (0,0), X πa,0 and M πa,πa for square lattice, Γ (0,0), X πa1,0 , M πa1,πa2 and K 0,πa2 for rectangular lattice, Γ (0,0), X 4π3a,0 , M πa,π3a , X' 2π3a,2π3a and M' 0,2π3a for triangular lattice, Γ (0,0), X 4π33a,0 , M π3a,π3a , X' 2π39a,2π3a and M' 0,2π3a for honeycomb lattice, and Γ (0,0), X 2π3a,0 , M π2a,π23a , X' π3a,π3a and M' 0,π3a for Kagomé lattice, respectively, where a is the lattice parameter for square, triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices, whereas a1, a2 are the lattice parameters for rectangular lattice.

The constitutive equations of an elastic piezoelectric material are41:

σij=cijkluk.lelijEl, (1)

Di=eikluk.lɛilEl, (2)

where i,j,k,l = 1,2,3, σij is the elastic stress tensor, Di is the electric displacement vector, ui is the elastic displacement vector, El is the electric field vector, cijkl is the elastic stiffness tensor, elij is the piezoelectric tensor and ϵil is the dielectric tensor. The standard tensor notation is used with Latin indices running from 1 to 3. They obey Einstein's summation convention when repeated.

We restricted the treatment to linear media, thus the elastic strain tensor εkl is simplified:

εkl=12uk,l+ul,k. (3)

Furthermore, based on the quasi-static approximation, there is no electro source (i.e. since there is no voltage source, this configuration is also known as an open circuit) and the curl is zero, thus the electric field is taken as gradient of scalar potential and one can write:

ElΦΦ,l. (4)

The differential equations of motion in absence of body forces are given by:

σij,i=ρu¨j, (5)

Di,i=0, (6)

where ρ is the mass density and dot denotes differentiation with respect to time. Substituting Eqs. (1-2) in Eqs. (5-6), applying the simplifications of Eqs. (3-4), considering a transversely isotropic elastic solid and for a two-dimensional problem, ∂/∂x3=0, results:

ρu¨1=c11u1,1+c12u2,2,1+c66u1,2+u2,1,2, (7)

ρu¨2=c12u1,1+c11u2,2,2+c66u1,2+u2,1,1, (8)

ρu¨3=c44u3,1+e15Φ,1,1+c44u3,2+e15Φ,2,2, (9)

0=e15u3,1ɛ11Φ,1,1+e15u3,2ɛ11Φ,2,2, (10)

where c66= 12 (c11 - c12). Note that Eqs. (7-10) are written using Voigt notation and from now on this notation is adopted.

In addition, considering a piezoelectric PC, one can note that c11 = c11 (r), c12 = c12 (r), c66 = c66 (r), c44 = c44 (r), e15 = e15 (r), ϵ11 = ϵ11 (r), ρ = ρ(r), because we consider two different materials - BaTiO3 inclusions and a polymeric matrix, and ui = ui (r,t). For a two-dimensional periodicity (the system has translational symmetry in z direction and material parameters depend only on the x and y coordinates), then r = xe1 + ye2 (x,y ∈ ℝ) is the two-dimensional spatial vector and ei (i = 1,2) are the basis vectors in real space.

In order to eliminate the factor time in Eqs. (7-10), we apply the temporal Fourier transform. Applying Floquet-Bloch's theorem82-83, expanding Bloch wave amplitude as Fourier series in reciprocal space and considering wave propagation in the xy plane (k3 = 0), we can write:

uir=ejk.ruikr=ejk.rg=+uikgejg.r=g=+uikgejk+g.r, (11)

where uik (r) is the Bloch wave amplitude, note that uik (r) = uik (r + r) and ui(r + r) = ui(r)ejk.r, ejk.r is called Bloch periodic boundary condition, k = ub1 + 𝑣b2 is the Bloch wave vector, u, 𝑣 ∈ ℚ are the symmetry points within the FIBZ in reciprocal space, or we may write k = k1 e1 + k2 e2, k1, k2 ∈ ℝ are the point coordinates within the FIBZ in Figure 1 (f-h) for the reciprocal space. The basis vectors in reciprocal space bi (i = 1,2) are defined as aibj = 2πδij, δij = 0 if i ≠ j or δij = 1 if i = j is the Kronecker delta, b1 = 2π a2×a3a1·a2×a3 b2 = 2π a3×a1a2·a3×a1 ai (i = 1,2) are the components of the lattice vector r = (pa1 + qa2), p, q ∈ ℤ.

The lattice vector components are ai = aei (i = 1,2) for square lattice, a1 = a1 e1, a2 = a2 e2 for rectangular lattice, a1 = ae1, a2 = a2 e1 + a32 e2 for triangular lattice, a1 = a32 e1 + 3a2 e2, a2 = - a32 e1 + 3a2 e2 for honeycomb lattice and a1 = ae1 + a3 e2, a2 = -ae1 + a3 e2 for Kagomé lattice.

The reciprocal lattice vector is defined as g=2πame1+ne2 (m, n ∈ ℤ) for square lattice, g=2πma1e1+na2e2 for rectangular lattice, g=2πame1+m+2n3e2 for triangular lattice, g=2πa3mne1+m+n3e2 for honeycomb lattice and g=πamne1+m+n3e2 for Kagomé lattice. Note that g is a two-dimensional vector because we consider two-dimensional periodicity.

Furthermore, we may expand c11,c12,c66,c44,e1511, ρ in Fourier series on the reciprocal space as:

Pr=g=+Pgejg.r, (12)

where P is one of the c11,c12,c66,c44,e1511, ρ and g has the same expressions of g with m, n ∈ ℤ. We use g instead of g to highlight the difference between the Fourier series expansion of material properties and displacements.

Substituting Eqs. (11) and (12) in Eqs. (7-10), with g˜ = g + g, multiplying by e-jg.r and integrating over the unit cell, we may write:

Kω2Mq=0 (13)

where

K=K11K1200K21K220000K33K3400K43K44 (14)

The sub-matrices in Eq. (14) are given by:

K11=c11ggk+g1k+g1+c66ggk+g2k+g2, (15)

K12=c12ggk+g2k+g1+c66ggk+g1k+g2, (16)

K21=c12ggk+g1k+g2+c66ggk+g2k+g1, (17)

K22=c11ggk+g2k+g2+c66ggk+g1k+g1, (18)

K33=c44ggk+g1k+g1+c44ggk+g2k+g2, (19)

K34=e15ggk+g1k+g1+e15ggk+g2k+g2, (20)

K44=ɛ11ggk+g1k+g1ɛ11ggk+g2k+g2, (21)

K43=K34. (22)

The matrix M in Eq. (13) is expressed by:

M=ρgg0000ρgg0000ρgg00000 (23)

The vector q in Eq. (13) is given by:

q=u1kgu2kgu3kgΦkg. (24)

Equation (13) is an infinite system of equations, thus the Fourier series needs to be truncated. We choose m,m,n,n = [-M, ..., M] and the total number of plane waves is (2M + 1)2. Equation (13) represents a generalized eigenvalue problem of ω2 (k) and should be solved for each k into the FIBZ for square, rectangular, triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices (Figure 1(f-h)).

The Fourier coefficients are defined as:

Pg=fPA+1fPBforg=0PAPBFgforg0, (25)

where the indexes A and B in Eq. (25) are related to inclusion (BaTiO3) and polymeric matrix, respectively, F(g) is the structure function and ƒ is the filling fraction of each type of inclusion, considering circular section of radius , square section of width 2l, rotated square section of width 2l with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to x and y axes and hollow circular section with external radius and internal radius , > . The hollow cylinder inclusion has an internal radius r̃ of the same polymer at matrix and a thickness - of BaTiO3, similar to Anjos & Arantes10.

The filling fraction is defined as ƒ = SA/SC for square, rectangular and triangular lattices, whereas for honeycomb and Kagomé lattices it is defined as ƒ = 2SA/SC and ƒ = 3SA/SC, respectively, where SA is the cross section area of the BaTiO3 inclusions and SC = ‖a1 × a2‖ is the cross section area of the unit cell. Note that differently from other lattices honeycomb and Kagomé lattices have two and three inclusions per unit cell, respectively.

The filling fractions for square, rectangular, triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices are:

f=πr˜2/a2forcircularsection4l2/a2forsquaresection4l2/a2forrotatedsquaresectionπR˜2r˜2/a2forhollowsection, (26)

f=πr˜2/a1a2forcircularsection4l2/a1a2forsquaresection4l2/a1a2forrotatedsquaresectionπR˜2r˜2/a1a2forhollowsection, (27)

f=2πr˜2/3a2forcircularsection8l2/3a2forsquaresection8l2/3a2forrotatedsquaresection2πR˜2r˜2/3a2forhollowsection, (28)

f=4πr˜2/33a2forcircularsection16l2/33a2forsquaresection16l2/33a2forrotatedsquaresection4πR˜2r˜2/33a2forhollowsection, (29)

f=π3r˜2/2a2forcircularsection23l2/a2forsquaresection23l2/a2forrotatedsquaresectionπ3R˜2r˜2/2a2forhollowsection, (30)

respectively.

The structure function for square, rectangular and triangular lattices F(g) is given by:

Fg=1Scejg.rd2r. (31)

The integral in Eq. (31) is performed over the unit cell cross section. The structure functions for square, rectangular and triangular lattices are calculated by:

Fg=2fJ1gr˜/gr˜forcircularsectionfsing1l/g1lsing2l/g2lforsquaresectionfsinl/2g1+g2l/2g1+g2sinl/2g1+g2l/2g1+g2forsquarerotatedsection2fJ1gR˜r˜/R˜J1gR˜/gR˜forhollowsection (32)

where g = ‖g‖ and g1,2 = ‖g1,2‖.

The structure function for honeycomb lattice FH(g) is defined as84:

FHg=cosg·u11Scejg·rd2r=cosg·u1Fg, (33)

where ū1 = -ū2 = a(0,1/2) are vectors that define central position of the two BaTiO3 inclusions within the honeycomb unit cell. We choose these vectors similar to Gao et al.85. Thus, the structure functions of BaTiO3 inclusions for honeycomb lattice are the same of Eq. (31) multiplied by cos(gu1), considering ƒ from Eq. (29).

The structure function for Kagomé lattice FKg (g) is defined as:

FKgg=13i=13ejg·ui1Scejg·rd2r=13i=13ejg·uiFg (34)

where u¯1=a2e13a6e2,u¯2=a2e13a6e2,u¯3=3a3e1 are vectors that define the three BaTiO3 inclusion positions within the Kagomé unit cell. It is possible to split Eq. (34) in its real and imaginary parts:

Fkgg=ReFkgg+jImFkgg (35)

ReFkgg=2cosg1u11cosg2u12+cos2g2u12Fg, (36)

ImFkgg=2cosg1u11sing2u12+sin2g1u12Fg, (37)

where ūj1,2 = ‖ūj1,2‖.

3. Results and Discussion

The physical parameters of BaTiO3 inclusion (A) and polymeric matrix (B) are listed in Table 1. We calculate the elastic band structure considering initially a fixed filling fraction, 0.335, for the four inclusion cross section geometries considered - circular, hollow circular, square and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes, in a square, rectangular, triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices. In the course of numerical calculations, we consider 441 plane waves for Fourier series expansion (i.e. M = 10), which results in a good convergence. Band structure plots are limited until a maximum frequency of 0.12 THz.

Table 1 Physical parameters of BaTiO3 inclusion (A) and polymeric matrix (B). 

Geometry/Property Value
Lattice parameter (ɑ) 30 x 10-9 m
Lattice parameter (ɑ1) 30 x 10-9 m
Lattice parameter (ɑ2) 25 x 10-9 m
Filling fraction (ƒ) 0.335
Mass density (ρAB) 5730 kg/m3, 1150 kg/m3
Elastic constant (c11A,c11B) 166 x 109 N/m2, 7.8 x 109 N/m2
Elastic constant (c12A,c12B) 77 x 109 N/m2, 4.7 x 109 N/m2
Elastic constant (c44A,c44B) 43 x 109 N/m2, 1.6 x 109 N/m2
Elastic constant (c66A,c66B) 44.5 x 109 N/m2, 1.55 x 109 N/m2
Piezoelectric coefficient(e15A,e15B) 11.6 C/m2, 0 C/m2
Dielectric coefficient (𝜖11A,𝜖11B) 11.2 x 10-9 C2/Nm2, 0.0398 x 10-9 C2/Nm2

Note that ais the lattice parameter for square, triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices, and a1, a2are the lattice parameters for rectangular lattice.

Figure 2 (a-d) shows the band structures of the nano-piezoelectric PC for square lattice, considering the four types of inclusions and XY (red) and Z (blue) modes. We plot the band structures in the principal symmetry directions of FIBZ (see Figure 1 (f-h)). Plots are given in terms of frequency in Hz versus the reduced Bloch wave vector, k = kɑ/2π. The reduced Bloch wave vector for rectangular lattice is calculated taking into account a=a12+a22 . In Figure 2 (a), two complete band gaps are obtained for circular inclusion.

Figure 2 Elastic band structures of XY (red) and Z (blue) modes of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix for square lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

From now on the relation between parameters and for hollow circular inclusion is = 0.2 and we do not investigate the influence of BaTiO3 thickness, i.e. - , in the band structure. The thickness influence of a carbon microstructure inclusion for square lattice was investigated by Anjos & Arantes10. Figure 2 (b) presents one complete band gap for hollow circular inclusion and we can observe that first branches occur in higher frequencies compared to the other inclusions.

Figure 2 (c) shows two complete band gaps for square inclusion and its first complete band gap is broader than the complete band gaps for circular and hollow circular inclusions. When these square inclusions are rotated 45º with respect to x and y axes (Figure 2 (d)) three complete gaps are opened up. The broadest complete band gap for square lattice is for rotated square inclusion with a bandwidth of 11.97 GHz (43.5 GHz is the center frequency).

Figure 3 (a-d) shows the band structures for rectangular lattice. For circular and hollow circular inclusions, the band gap behavior of rectangular lattice is similar to square lattice, however they are narrower than the complete band gaps in a square lattice. For square and rotated square inclusions, only one and two complete band gaps are opened up, respectively. Similar to square lattice, the broadest complete band gap for rectangular lattice is opened up for rotated square inclusion with a bandwidth of 8.51 GHz (44.59 GHz is the center frequency).

Figure 3 Elastic band structures of XY (red) and Z (blue) modes of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix for rectangular lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

Figure 4 (a-d) illustrates the band structures for triangular lattice. For circular, square and rotated square inclusions, a wide complete band gap is created. The broadest complete band gap for triangular lattice is for circular inclusion with a bandwidth of 12.98 GHz (36.31 GHz is the center frequency). A narrow complete band gap is also opened up for circular inclusion in high bands. For hollow inclusion, one complete band gap is created between 58.69 GHz-49.94 GHz. Comparing the band structures of triangular lattice to square and rectangular lattices, we observe that triangular lattice with circular inclusion presents the broadest complete band gap.

Figure 4 Elastic band structures of XY (red) and Z (blue) modes of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix for triangular lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

In Figures 5 (a-d) and 6 (a-d), honeycomb and Kagomé lattices, respectively, the band structures of square and rotated square inclusions present similar band gap behavior. The band structure of circular inclusion in honeycomb and Kagomé lattices presents seven and five complete band gaps, respectively. For Kagomé lattice, all the complete band gaps are narrower than the broadest complete band gap from square, rectangular, triangular and honeycomb lattices. The broadest complete band gap for honeycomb lattice is for circular inclusion with a bandwidth of 9.77 GHz (31.19 GHz is the center frequency). For hollow inclusion in honeycomb and Kagomé lattices, we can observe two and one complete band gaps, respectively, and the first bands appear in higher frequencies compared to the other inclusions, similar as observed to other lattices - square, rectangular and triangular.

Figure 5 Elastic band structures of XY (red) and Z (blue) modes of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix for honeycomb lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

Figure 6 Elastic band structures of XY (red) and Z (blue) modes of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix for Kagomé lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

Comparing the band structures for honeycomb and Kagomé lattices, we observe that honeycomb lattice presents the best performance (more complete band gaps and broader complete band gaps) for all inclusions.

In Figures 7-11, we show the comparison between Z modes of the nano-piezoelectric PC with (blue asterisks) and without (e15A = 0) (black circles) piezoelectricity for square, rectangular, triangular, honeycomb and Kagomé lattices, respectively. The influence of piezoelectricity is significant on the band gaps for all lattices and inclusions. This influence is more evident in high frequencies60 for circular, square and rotated square inclusions. However, for hollow circular inclusion in all lattices (Figures 7-11 (b)), the piezoelectricity is also significant in lower frequencies.

Figure 7 Elastic band structures of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix considering Z mode with (blue asterisks) and without (black circles) piezoelectricity for square lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

Figure 8 Elastic band structures of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix considering Z mode with (blue asterisks) and without (black circles) piezoelectricity for rectangular lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

Figure 9 Elastic band structures of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix considering Z mode with (blue asterisks) and without (black circles) piezoelectricity for triangular lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

Figure 10 Elastic band structures of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix considering Z mode with (blue asterisks) and without (black circles) piezoelectricity for honeycomb lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

Figure 11 Elastic band structures of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix considering Z mode with (blue asterisks) and without (black circles) piezoelectricity for Kagomé lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

We illustrate in Figures 12-16 the complete band gap widths between XY and Z modes as a function of filling fraction for all inclusions and lattices. Piezoelectricity is included in this analysis.

Figure 12 Elastic complete band gap widths between XY and Z modes of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix as a function of filling fraction for square lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

In a square lattice (Figure 12), circular and square inclusions provide the best behavior with high complete band gap widths in a broad range of filling fraction. Considering the first band gap, square inclusion shows the highest one in a broad range of filling fraction. Furthermore, square inclusion also presents four complete band gaps. Hollow circular inclusion presents only one complete band gap, whereas rotated square inclusion does not present better performance than square inclusion.

For rectangular lattice, Figure 13, hollow circular inclusion opens up just one narrow complete band gap, whereas rotated square inclusion creates three complete band gaps, however, only the second one appear in a broad range of filling fraction. Similar as square lattice (Figure 12), circular and square inclusions present the broadest complete band gaps for rectangular lattice. Complete band gap widths in rectangular lattice are lower than in square lattice for all inclusions.

Figure 13 Elastic complete band gap widths between XY and Z modes of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix as a function of filling fraction for rectangular lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

Figure 14 shows complete band gap widths for triangular lattice. Circular inclusion presents the best performance. Comparing triangular lattice (Figure 14) to square lattice (Figure 12), triangular lattice presents the best performance for circular (first complete band gap), hollow circular and rotated square inclusions. However, for square inclusion, square lattice shows better performance than triangular lattice. There are two important variables to conclude which is the best band gap performance, that is to say the band gap width (the higher, the better) and the filling fraction range in which the band gaps are opened (the broader, the better).

Figure 14 Elastic complete band gap widths between XY and Z modes of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix as a function of filling fraction for triangular lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

Comparing honeycomb (Figure 15) and Kagomé (Figure 16) lattices, the best performance is found for honeycomb lattice considering circular, hollow circular and rotated square inclusions. However, the difference among these lattices is subtle. The highest band gap width for honeycomb and Kagomé lattices is for circular inclusion. Comparing honeycomb and Kagomé lattices to the other lattices, we can observe that for all inclusions, the best behavior is found for square (Figure 12) and triangular (Figure 14) lattices. The worst performance is found for rectangular lattice with hollow circular inclusion (Figure 13 (b)).

Figure 15 Elastic complete band gap widths between XY and Z modes of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix as a function of filling fraction for honeycomb lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

Figure 16 Elastic complete band gap widths between XY and Z modes of BaTiO3 inclusions in a polymeric matrix as a function of filling fraction for Kagomé lattice. The following types of inclusions are considered - circular (a), hollow circular (b), square (c) and rotated square with a 45º angle of rotation with respect to the x, y axes. 

4. Conclusion

Broad complete band gaps are obtained for a nano-piezoelectric PC, consisting of BaTiO3 inclusions embedded in a polymeric matrix, for different inclusion geometries and different lattices. We firstly study the elastic band structure for a fixed filling fraction of 0.335 considering XY and Z modes. For square lattice, the broadest complete band gap is found for rotated square inclusion with 11.97 GHz of bandwidth. This inclusion geometry is also the best one for rectangular lattice. Triangular lattice presents the broadest complete band gap than the other lattices for circular inclusion. The elastic band structure for honeycomb and Kagomé lattices presents several complete band gaps. However, for Kagomé lattice, all of them are narrower than the complete band gaps from square, rectangular, triangular and honeycomb lattices.

The Z mode with and without piezoelectric effect is also investigated for a fixed filling fraction of 0.335. This effect is significant on the band gaps for all lattices and inclusions, and it is more evident in higher frequencies for circular, square and rotated square inclusions. However, piezoelectricity is significant in lower frequencies for hollow circular inclusion.

We also analyze the complete band gap bandwidths as a function of filling fraction for all inclusions and lattices with piezoelectric effect. Among square, rectangular and triangular lattices, triangular lattice presents the best performance for circular inclusion (first complete band gap), hollow circular and rotated square inclusions. For square inclusion, square lattice shows the best performance. Among honeycomb and Kagomé lattices, the best performance is found for honeycomb lattice considering circular, hollow circular and rotated square inclusions.

The best band gap performance (i.e. highest band gap width and band gap opened up in a broad range of filling fraction) of the nano-piezoelectric PC investigated is for circular inclusion in a triangular lattice. However, it also depends on the application, for instance the frequency range of interest. Finally, we suggest that elastic complete band gaps in nano-piezoelectric PCs enlarge the potential applications for elastic vibration control in GHz.

5. Acknowledgments

The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of this investigation by the Brazilian research funding agency FAPEMA (State Funding Agency of Maranhão) and by IFMA (Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Maranhão).

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Received: March 17, 2017; Revised: August 16, 2017; Accepted: September 17, 2017

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