Bovine serum albumin potentiates caffeine- or ATP-induced tension in human skinned skeletal muscle fibers

C.G. Ponte C.F. Oliveira G. Suarez-Kurtz

Abstract

Human skinned muscle fibers were used to investigate the effects of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the tension/pCa relationship and on the functional properties of the Ca2+-release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In both fast- and slow-type fibers, identified by their tension response to pSr 5.0, BSA (0.7-15 µM) had no effect on the Ca2+ affinity of the contractile proteins and elicited no tension per se in Ca2+-loaded fibers. In contrast, BSA (>1.0 µM) potentiated the caffeine-induced tension in Ca2+-loaded fibers, this effect being more intense in slow-type fibers. Thus, BSA reduced the threshold caffeine concentration required for eliciting detectable tension, and increased the amplitude, the rate of rise and the area under the curve of caffeine-induced tension. BSA also potentiated the tension elicited in Ca2+-loaded fibers by low-Mgv solutions containing 1.0 mM free ATP. These results suggest that BSA modulates the response of the human skeletal muscle SR Ca2+-release channel to activators such as caffeine and ATP.

calcium-release channel; sarcoplasmic reticulum; human muscle fiber; bovine serum albumin; caffeine


Braz J Med Biol Res, May 1997, Volume 30(5) 675-678 (Short Communication)

Bovine serum albumin potentiates caffeine- or ATP-induced tension in human skinned skeletal muscle fibers

C.G. Ponte, C.F. Oliveira and G. Suarez-Kurtz

Departamento de Bioquímica Médica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil

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References

Correspondence and Footnotes

Abstract

Human skinned muscle fibers were used to investigate the effects of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the tension/pCa relationship and on the functional properties of the Ca2+-release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In both fast- and slow-type fibers, identified by their tension response to pSr 5.0, BSA (0.7-15 µM) had no effect on the Ca2+ affinity of the contractile proteins and elicited no tension per se in Ca2+-loaded fibers. In contrast, BSA (>1.0 µM) potentiated the caffeine-induced tension in Ca2+-loaded fibers, this effect being more intense in slow-type fibers. Thus, BSA reduced the threshold caffeine concentration required for eliciting detectable tension, and increased the amplitude, the rate of rise and the area under the curve of caffeine-induced tension. BSA also potentiated the tension elicited in Ca