Journal of Applied Oral Science, Volume: 20, Issue: 5, Published: 2012
  • Saliva and dental erosion Review

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Hannas, Angélicas Reis; Kato, Melissa Thiemi

    Abstract in English:

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.
  • Decreased phagocytic function in neutrophils and monocytes from peripheral blood in periodontal disease Original Articles

    Carneiro, Valéria Martins Araújo; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Barreto; Guimarães, Maria do Carmo Machado; Muniz-Junqueira, Maria Imaculada

    Abstract in English:

    Phagocytosis by neutrophils and monocytes constitutes the main defense mechanism against bacterial challenges in periodontitis. Phagocytosis by neutrophils has already been evaluated, whereas phagocytic function of monocytes has hardly been addressed so far. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess phagocytosis by neutrophils and monocytes in periodontitis. Material and Methods: The sample included 30 subjects with severe periodontitis and 27 control subjects without periodontal disease. The phagocytic index (PhI) was calculated as the mean number of adhered/ingested Saccharomyces cerevisiae per phagocytozing monocyte or neutrophil multiplied by the percentage of phagocytes involved in phagocytosis. Results: A significant reduction in phagocyte functions was observed in individuals with periodontitis. The median of PhI of neutrophils using nonsensitized S. cerevisiae was 3 for the control group, and 1.5 for the periodontitis group (p=0.01, Mann-Whitney test). The median of PhI of monocytes with non-sensitized S. cerevisiae was 26.13 for the control group, and 13.23 for the periodontitis group (p=0.03, Mann Whitney test). The median of PhI of monocytes assessed with sensitized S. cerevisiae was 97.92 for the control group and 60.1 for the periodontitis group (p=0.005, t-test). Conclusion: The data demonstrated a reduction in the function of phagocytes, suggesting a decrease in immune defenses in periodontitis.
  • Impact of filler size and distribution on roughness and wear of composite resin after simulated toothbrushing Original Articles

    Oliveira, Gabriela Ulian de; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Charantola Rodrigues, Marcela; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Wang, Linda

    Abstract in English:

    OBJECTIVES: Nanofilled composite resins are claimed to provide superior mechanical properties compared with microhybrid resins. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare nanofilled with microhybrid composite resins. The null hypothesis was that the size and the distribution of fillers do not influence the mechanical properties of surface roughness and wear after simulated toothbrushing test. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten rectangular specimens (15 mm x 5 mm x 4 mm) of Filtek Z250 (FZ2), Admira (A), TPH3 (T),Esthet-X (EX), Estelite Sigma (ES), Concept Advanced (C), Grandio (G) and Filtek Z350 (F) were prepared according to manufacturer's instructions. Half of each top surface was protected with nail polish as control surface (not brushed) while the other half was assessed with five random readings using a roughness tester (Ra). Following, the specimens were abraded by simulated toothbrushing with soft toothbrushes and slurry comprised of 2:1 water and dentifrice (w/w). 100,000 strokes were performed and the brushed surfaces were reanalyzed. Nail polish layers were removed from the specimens so that the roughness (Ra) and the wear could be assessed with three random readings (µm). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's multiple-comparison test (α=0.05). RESULTS: Overall outcomes indicated that composite resins showed a significant increase in roughness after simulated toothbrushing, except for Grandio, which presented a smoother surface. Generally, wear ofnanofilled resins was significantly lower compared with microhybrid resins. CONCLUSIONS: As restorative materials suffer alterations under mechanical challenges, such as toothbrushing, the use of nanofilled materials seem to be more resistant than microhybrid composite resins, being less prone to be rougher and worn.
  • A new portable vibrator for plaster pouring: effect on the marginal fit at cylinder-abutment Original Articles

    Andrade, Pâmela Cândida Aires Ribas de; Luthi, Leonardo Flores; Stanley, Kyle; Cardoso, Antônio Carlos

    Abstract in English:

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to test a new portable vibrator for plaster pouring (developed for this purpose), comparing the effect of its use on the accuracy of working cast of implant-supported restorations to the conventional vibrator. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From a master cast with 2 implants, 30 transfer moldings were made randomly and divided into three groups: Group I (GI): pouring performed in an outsourced dental laboratory with conventional plaster vibrator (10 casts), Group II (GII): pouring performed in the laboratory of the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) with conventional plaster vibrator (10 casts) and Group III (GIII): pouring performed with the portable vibrator fabricated for this study (10 casts). The position of the analogue and marginal adaptation of the infrastructure were verified by testing the single screw on the master model and on the working model. The measurement of misfit was blindly performed with a precision microscope and analyzing unit, Quadra-Check 200. The data were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Holm-Sidak test (α=0.05). RESULTS: Means±standard deviations were as follows: GI: 19.19±4.73 µm; GII: 21.72±5.41 µm; GIII: 13.5±2.39 µm (P<0.05), with GIII significantly lower as compared to the other groups. CONCLUSION: Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that a greater accuracy of working cast was achieved when a portable vibrator was used for casting molds.
  • In vivo accuracy of conventional and digital radiographic methods in confirming root canal working length determination by Root ZX Original Articles

    Orosco, Fernando Accorsi; Bernardineli, Norberti; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Duarte, Marco Antonio Húngaro; Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes de

    Abstract in English:

    OBJECTIVES: To compare, in vivo, the accuracy of conventional and digital radiographic methods in determining root canal working length. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-five maxillary incisor or canine teeth from 22 patients were used in this study. Considering the preoperative radiographs as the baseline, a 25 K file was inserted into the root canal to the point where the Root ZX electronic apex locator indicated the APEX measurement in the screen. From this measurement, 1 mm was subtracted for positioning the file. The radiographic measurements were made using a digital sensor (Digora 1.51) or conventional type-E films, size 2, following the paralleling technique, to determine the distance of the file tip and the radiographic apex. RESULTS: The Student "t" test indicated mean distances of 1.11 mm to conventional and 1.20 mm for the digital method and indicated a significant statistical difference (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The conventional radiographic method was found to be superior to the digital one in determining the working length of the root canal.
  • Histomorphometric analysis of the temporal bone after change of direction of force vector of mandible: an experimental study in rabbits Original Articles

    Puricelli, Edela; Ponzoni, Deise; Munaretto, Jéssica Cerioli; Corsetti, Adriana; Leite, Mauro Gomes Trein

    Abstract in English:

    OBJECTIVES: The present study aimed at performing a histological evaluation of the response of temporal bone tissue to a change of direction of the force vector of the mandible in relation to the base of the skull. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Adult rabbits were assigned into four groups with two control and four experimental animals in each group. experimental animals underwent surgery, which resulted in a change of direction of the force vector on the right temporomandibular joint. Samples were collected after 15, 30, 60 and 90 days for histological analysis. RESULTS: In the two-way analysis of variance, the effect of group and time was statistically significant (p<0.001). Additionally, a statistically significant interaction between group and time was observed (p<0.001). Control animals showed normal growth and development of the temporal region. In the experimental group, the change in direction of the force vector of the mandible induced significant changes in the temporal bone, with a bone modeling process, which suggests growth of this cranial structure. CONCLUSIONS: The methodology used in this experiment allows us to conclude that the change in direction of the force vector of the mandible in relation to the skull base induces remodeling and modeling processes in the temporal bone. The resumption of normal oral functions after bone healing of the mandibular fracture appears to increase cell activation in the remodeling and modeling of the temporal bone structure. The observation of areas of temporal bone modeling shows the relevance of further investigation on the correlation between the joint structures and craniofacial growth and development.
  • Dentoalveolar comparative study between removable and fixed cribs, associated to chincup, in anterior open bite treatment Original Articles

    Torres, Fernando César; Almeida, Renato Rodrigues de; Almeida-Pedrin, Renata Rodrigues de; Pedrin, Fernando; Paranhos, Luiz Renato

    Abstract in English:

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this prospective study was to compare the dentoalveolar effects produced by two types of palatal crib, removable (Rpc+C) and fixed (Fpc+C), combined with chincup in growing patients with anterior open bite. MATERIAL AND METHODS: each group comprised 30 patients, in the mixed dentition phase, with similar cephalometric characteristics and skeletal ages. Group 1 (Rpc+C) presented initial mean age of 8.3 years and mean anterior open bite of 4.0 mm. Group 2 (Fpc+C) presented initial mean age of 8.54 years and mean anterior open bite of 4.3 mm. The evaluation period comprised 12 months between initial (T1) and second lateral radiograph (T2). The T2-T1 changes were compared cephalometrically in the 2 groups using the non-paired t-test. RESULTS: Vertical changes in the posterior dentoalveolar region were similar between the groups (about 1 mm) and no significant differences were found in molar mesialization. The Fpc+C group had in average 1.6 mm more improvement of the overbite as a result of greater maxillary incisor extrusion (1.3 mm). Patients in this group also presented less lingual tipping of maxillary incisors and more mandibular incisors uprighting. CONCLUSIONS: The Fpc+C combination was more efficient in the correction of the negative overbite mainly due to greater extrusion of the maxillary incisors. However, the Rpc+C appliance promoted better upper and lower incisor inclination, resulting in a more adequate overjet.
  • Effect of pre-flaring and file size on the accuracy of two electronic apex locators Original Articles

    Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Camilo, Carla Cristina; Moreira-Júnior, Gil; Pecora, Jesus Djalma; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    Abstract in English:

    OBJECTIVE: This ex vivo study evaluated the effect of pre-flaring and file size on the accuracy of the Root ZX and Novapex electronic apex locators (EALs). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The actual working length (WL) was set 1 mm short of the apical foramen in the palatal root canals of 24 extracted maxillary molars. The teeth were embedded in an alginate mold, and two examiners performed the electronic measurements using #10, #15, and #20 K-files. The files were inserted into the root canals until the "0.0" or "APEX" signals were observed on the LED or display screens for the Novapex and Root ZX, respectively, retracting to the 1.0 mark. The measurements were repeated after the preflaring using the S1 and SX Pro-Taper instruments. Two measurements were performed for each condition and the means were used. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to verify the intra- and inter-examiner agreement. The mean differences between the WL and electronic length values were analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (p<0.05). RESULTS: ICCs were high (>0.8) and the results demonstrated a similar accuracy for both EALs (p>0.05). Statistically significant accurate measurements were verified in the pre-flared canals, except for the Novapex using a #20 K-file. CONCLUSIONS: The tested EALs showed acceptable accuracy, whereas the pre-flaring procedure revealed a more significant effect than the used file size.
  • Quantitative analysis of S. mutans and S. sobrinus cultivated independently and adhered to polished orthodontic composite resins Original Articles

    Velazquez-Enriquez, Ulises; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio Jose; Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalia; Flores-Estrada, Jaime; Uematsu, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Ryozo

    Abstract in English:

    In Orthodontics, fixed appliances placed in the oral cavity are colonized by microorganisms. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to quantitatively determine the independent bacterial colonization of S. mutans and S. sobrinus in orthodontic composite resins. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seven orthodontic composite adhesives for bonding brackets were selected and classified into 14 groups; (GIm, GIs) Enlight, (GIIm, GIIs) Grengloo, (GIIIm, GIIIs) Kurasper F, (GIVm, GIVs) BeautyOrtho Bond, (GVm, GVs) Transbond CC, (GVIm, GVIs) Turbo Bond II, (GVIIm, GVIIs) Blugloo. 60 blocks of 4x4x1 mm of each orthodontic composite resin were made (total 420 blocks), and gently polished with sand-paper and ultrasonically cleaned. S. mutans and S. sobrinus were independently cultivated. For the quantitative analysis, a radioactive marker was used to codify the bacteria (³H) adhered to the surface of the materials. The blocks were submerged in a solution with microorganisms previously radiolabeled and separated (210 blocks for S. mutans and 210 blocks for S. sobrinus) for 2 hours at 37ºC. Next, the blocks were placed in a combustion system, to capture the residues and measure the radiation. The statistical analysis was calculated with the ANOVA test (Sheffè post-hoc). RESULTS: Significant differences of bacterial adhesion were found amongst the groups. In the GIm and GIs the significant lowest scores for both microorganisms were shown; in contrast, the values of GVII for both bacteria were significantly the highest. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that the orthodontic composite resin evaluated in the GIm and GIs, obtained the lowest adherence of S. mutans and S. sobrinus, which may reduce the enamel demineralization and the risk of white spot lesion formation.
  • The influence of surface treatment on the implant roughness pattern Original Articles

    Rosa, Marcio Borges; Albrektsson, Tomas; Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; Schwartz Filho, Humberto Osvaldo; Wennerberg, Ann

    Abstract in English:

    An important parameter for the clinical success of dental implants is the formation of direct contact between the implant and surrounding bone, whose quality is directly influenced by the implant surface roughness. A screw-shaped design and a surface with an average roughness of Sa of 1-2 µm showed a better result. The combination of blasting and etching has been a commonly used surface treatment technique. The versatility of this type of treatment allows for a wide variation in the procedures in order to obtain the desired roughness. OBJECTIVES: To compare the roughness values and morphological characteristics of 04 brands of implants, using the same type of surface treatment. In addition, to compare the results among brands, in order to assess whether the type of treatment determines the values and the characteristics of implant surface roughness. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three implants were purchased directly from each selected company in the market, i.e., 03 Brazilian companies (Biomet 3i of Brazil, Neodent and Titaniumfix) and 01 Korean company (Oneplant). The quantitative or numerical characterization of the roughness was performed using an interferometer. The qualitative analysis of the surface topography obtained with the treatment was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy images. RESULTS: The evaluated implants showed a significant variation in roughness values: Sa for Oneplant was 1.01 µm; Titaniumfix reached 0.90 µm; implants from Neodent 0.67 µm, and Biomet 3i of Brazil 0.53 µm. Moreover, the SEM images showed very different patterns for the surfaces examined. CONCCLUSIONS: The surface treatment alone is not able to determine the roughness values and characteristics.
  • Effects of curing protocol and storage time on the micro-hardness of resin cements used to lute fiber-reinforced resin posts Original Articles

    Ramos, Marcelo Barbosa; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Pegoraro, Luiz Fernando; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins

    Abstract in English:

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the micro-hardness profile of two dual cure resin cements (RelyX - U100®, 3M-eSPe and Panavia F 2.0®, Kuraray) used for cementing fiberreinforced resin posts (Fibrekor® - Jeneric Pentron) under three different curing protocols and two water storage times. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty 16mm long bovine incisor roots were endodontically treated and prepared for cementation of the Fibrekor posts. The cements were mixed as instructed, dispensed in the canal, the posts were seated and the curing performed as follows: a) no light activation; b) light-activation immediately after seating the post, and; c) light-activation delayed 5 minutes after seating the post. The teeth were stored in water and retrieved for analysis after 7 days and 3 months. The roots were longitudinally sectioned and the microhardness was determined at the cervical, middle and apical regions along the cement line. The data was analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (curing mode, storage time and thirds) for each cement. The Tukey test was used for the post-hoc analysis. RESULTS: Light-activation resulted in a significant increase in the microhardness. This was more evident for the cervical region and for the Panavia cement. Storage in water for 3 months caused a reduction of the micro-hardness for both cements. The U100 cement showed less variation in the micro-hardness regardless of the curing protocol and storage time. CONCLUSIONS: The micro-hardness of the cements was affected by the curing and storage variables and were material-dependent.
  • A study of the distobuccal root canal orifice of the maxillary second molars in Chinese individuals evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography Original Articles

    Han, Xuan; Yang, Haibing; Li, Guoju; Yang, Lin; Tian, Cheng; Wang, Yan

    Abstract in English:

    As is commonly understood, the root canal morphology of the maxillary molars is usually complex and variable. It is sometimes difficult to detect the distobuccal root canal orifice of a maxillary second molar with root canal treatment. No literature related to the distobuccal root canals of the maxillary second molars has been published. Objective: To investigate the position of the distobuccal root canal orifice of the maxillary second molars in a Chinese population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Material and methods: In total, 816 maxillary second molars from 408 patients were selected from a Chinese population and scanned using CBCT. The following information was recorded: (1) the number of root canals per tooth, (2) the distance between the mesiobuccal and distobuccal root canal orifice (DM), (3) the distance between the palatal and distobuccal root canal orifice (DP), (4) the angle formed by the mesiobuccal, distobuccal and palatal root canal orifices (∠PDM). DM, DP and ∠PDM of the teeth with three or four root canals were analyzed and evaluated. Results: In total, 763 (93.51%) of 816 maxillary second molars had three or four root canals. The distance between the mesiobuccal and distobuccal orifice was 0.7 to 4.8 mm. 621 (81.39%) of 763 teeth were distributed within 1.5-3.0 mm. The distance between the palatal and distobuccal orifice ranged from 0.8 mm to 6.7 mm; 585 (76.67%) and were distributed within 3.0-5.0 mm. The angle (∠PDM) ranged from 69. 4º to 174.7º in 708 samples (92.80%), the angle ranged from 90º to 140º. Conclusions: The position of the distobuccal root canal orifice of the maxillary second molars with 3 or 4 root canals in a Chinese population was complex and variable. Clinicians should have a thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the maxillary second molars.
  • Analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy of the MDPB bactericidal effect on S. mutans biofilm CLSM analysis of MDPB bactericidal effect on biofilm Original Articles

    Carvalho, Fabíola Galbiatti de; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria; Fúcio, Suzana Beatriz Portugal de; Negrini, Thais de Cássia; Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

    Abstract in English:

    Since bacteria remain in the dentin following caries removal, restorative materials with antibacterial properties are desirable to help maintaining the residual microorganisms inactive. The adhesive system Clearfil Protect Bond (PB) contains the antibacterial monomer 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide (MDPB) in its primer, which has shown antimicrobial activity. However, its bactericidal effect against biofilm on the dentin has been little investigated. Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and viable bacteria counting (CFU) the MDPB bactericidal effect against S. mutans biofilm on the dentin surface. Material and methods: Bovine dentin surfaces were obtained and subjected to S. mutans biofilm formation in BHI broth supplemented with 1% (w/v) sucrose for 18 h. Samples were divided into three groups, according to the primer application (n=3): Clearfil Protect Bond (PB), Clearfil SE Bond, which does not contain MDPB, (SE) and saline (control group). After the biofilm formation, Live/ Dead stain was applied directly to the surface of each sample. Next, 10 µL of each primer were applied on the samples during 590 s for the real-time CLSM analysis. The experiment was conducted in triplicate. The primers and saline were also applied on the other dentin samples during 20, 90, 300 and 590 s (n=9 for each group and period evaluated) and the CFU were assessed by colonies counting. Results: The results of the CLSM showed that with the Se application, although non-viable bacteria were detected at 20 s, there was no increase in their count during 590 s. In contrast, after the PB application there was a gradual increase of non-viable bacteria over 590 s. Conclusions: The quantitative analysis demonstrated a significant decrease of S. mutans CFU at 90 s PB exposure and only after 300 s of Se application. Protect Bond showed an earlier antibacterial effect than Se Bond.
  • Effect of a multi-layer infection control barrier on the micro-hardness of a composite resin Original Articles

    Hwang, In-Nam; Hong, Sung-Ok; Lee, Bin-Na; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Oh, Won-Mann; Chang, Hoon-Sang

    Abstract in English:

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of multiple layers of an infection control barrier on the micro-hardness of a composite resin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One, two, four, and eight layers of an infection control barrier were used to cover the light guides of a high-power light emitting diode (LeD) light curing unit (LCU) and a low-power halogen LCU. The composite specimens were photopolymerized with the LCUs and the barriers, and the micro-hardness of the upper and lower surfaces was measured (n=10). The hardness ratio was calculated by dividing the bottom surface hardness of the experimental groups by the irradiated surface hardness of the control groups. The data was analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. RESULTS: The micro-hardness of the composite specimens photopolymerized with the LED LCU decreased significantly in the four- and eight-layer groups of the upper surface and in the two-, four-, and eight-layer groups of the lower surface. The hardness ratio of the composite specimens was <80% in the eight-layer group. The micro-hardness of the composite specimens photopolymerized with the halogen LCU decreased significantly in the eight-layer group of the upper surface and in the two-, four-, and eight-layer groups of the lower surface. However, the hardness ratios of all the composite specimens photopolymerized with barriers were <80%. CONCLUSIONS: The two-layer infection control barrier could be used on high-power LCUs without decreasing the surface hardness of the composite resin. However, when using an infection control barrier on the low-power LCUs, attention should be paid so as not to sacrifice the polymerization efficiency.
  • Micro-leakage at the implant-abutment interface with different tightening torques in vitro Original Articles

    Silva-Neto, João Paulo da; Prudente, Marcel Santana; Carneiro, Thiago de Almeida Prado Naves; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Penatti, Mario Paulo Amante; Neves, Flávio Domingues das

    Abstract in English:

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the microleakage at the implant/abutment interface of external hexagon (eH) implants and abutments with different amounts of bacteria and tightening torques. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A bacterial suspension was prepared to inoculate the implants. The first phase of this study used nine EH implants and abutments that were divided into three groups with different amounts of bacterial suspension (n=3): V0.5: 0.5 µL; V1.0: 1.0 µL e V1.5: 1.5 µL, and tightened to the manufacturer's recommended torque. The second phase of this experiment used 27 assemblies that were similar to those used in the first phase. These samples were inoculated with 0.5 µL of bacterial suspension and divided into three groups (n=9). T10: 10 Ncm; T20: 20 Ncm and T32: 32 Ncm. The samples were evaluated according to the turbidity of the broth every 24 hours for 14 days, and the bacteria viability was tested after that period. The statistical evaluation was conducted by Kruskal-Wallis testing (p<.05). RESULTS: During the first phase, groups V1.0 and V1.5 was presented with bacterial contamination in all samples after 24 h. During the second phase, two samples from group T10 and one from T20 presented positive results for bacterial contamination. Different amounts of bacterial solution led to overflow and contamination during the first 24 h of the experiment. The tightening torques did not statistically affect the microleakage in the assemblies. However, the group that was tightened to 32 Ncm torque did not show any bacterial contamination. CONCLUSION: After 14 days of experimentation, the bacteria were proven to remain viable inside the implant internal cavity.
  • Linear dimensional change, compressive strength and detail reproduction in type IV dental stone dried at room temperature and in a microwave oven Original Articles

    Silva, Marcos Aurélio Bomfim da; Vitti, Rafael Pino; Consani, Simonides; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek

    Abstract in English:

    The type IV dental stone is widely used for the fabrication of dyes and master casts for fixed and removable partial prostheses. It is typically normal to wait at least 24 hours for the casts to dry prior to beginning the laboratory procedures. The waiting time has been shown to be greatly reduced by using microwave drying. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the influence of drying techniques at room temperature and microwave oven on the linear dimensional change, compressive strength and detail reproduction in type IV dental stones. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three type IV dental stone brands were selected; elite Rock, Shera Premium and Durone IV. Two different drying protocols were tested in 4 groups (n=10); G1 - room temperature (25±4ºC) dried for 2 hours; G2 - room temperature dried for 24 hours; G3 - room temperature dried for 7 days and G4 - microwave oven dried at 800 W for 5 minutes and after 2 hours at room temperature. After drying, the samples were assayed for dimensional charges. The sample surface was submitted to the ImageTool 3.0 software for compressive strength in a universal testing machine with a cell load of 50 KN at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minutes and the detail reproduction was analyzed with a stereomicroscope at 25x magnification. The statistical analysis of the linear dimensional change and compressive strength data were conducted by the ANOVA test followed by the Tukey test (p<0.05). Detailed reproduction values were reported in percentages. RESULTS: For the compressive strength test, Elite Rock and Durone IV did not present significant differences between G2 and G4, while Shera Premium did not present differences between G3 and G4. The best reproduction levels were observed for G3. CONCLUSIONS: Dental stone microwave oven drying showed a linear dimensional change similar to after room temperature drying for 24 hours and 7 days. The compressive strength of the stone dried in the microwave oven was similar to those dried at room temperature for 24 hours, with the exception of Shera Premium, which had similar results for microwave and room temperature drying for 7 days. For the microwave drying method the detail reproduction levels for samples dried at room temperature for 24 hours and 7 days were similar, except for the Durone IV.
  • The Journal of Applied Oral Science welcomes the Co-Editor-in-Chief

    Santos, Carlos F.
Faculdade De Odontologia De Bauru - USP Serviço de Biblioteca e Documentação FOB-USP, Al. Dr. Octávio Pinheiro Brisolla 9-75, 17012-901 Bauru SP Brasil, Tel.: +55 14 32358373 - Bauru - SP - Brazil
E-mail: jaos@usp.br