Impact and seasonality of human rhinovirus infection in hospitalized patients for two consecutive years Please cite this article as: Leotte J, Trombetta H, Faggion HZ, Almeida BM, Nogueira MB, Vidal LR, et al. Impact and seasonality of human rhinovirus infection in hospitalized patients for two consecutive years. J Pediatr (Rio J). 2017;93:294-300.

Jaqueline Leotte Hygor Trombetta Heloisa Z. Faggion Bernardo M. Almeida Meri B. Nogueira Luine R. Vidal Sonia M. Raboni About the authors

Abstract

Objectives:

To report epidemiological features, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of human rhinovirus (HRV) infections in comparison with other community acquired respiratory virus (CRV) infections in patients hospitalized for two consecutive years.

Methods:

This was a cross-sectional study. Clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory data of patients hospitalized with acute respiratory syndrome in a tertiary care hospital from 2012 to 2013 were reviewed.

Results:

HRV was the most common CRV observed (36%, 162/444) and was present in the majority of viral co-detections (69%, 88/128), mainly in association with human enterovirus (45%). Most HRV-infected patients were younger than 2 years (57%). Overall, patients infected with HRV had a lower frequency of severe acute respiratory infection than those infected with other CRVs (60% and 84%, respectively, p = 0.006), but had more comorbidities (40% and 27%, respectively; p = 0.043). However, in the adjusted analysis this association was not significant. The mortality rate within the HRV group was 3%. Detection of HRV was more prevalent during autumn and winter, with a moderately negative correlation between viral infection frequency and temperature (r = −0.636, p < 0.001) but no correlation with rainfall (r = −0.036, p = 0.866).

Conclusion:

HRV is usually detected in hospitalized children with respiratory infections and is often present in viral co-detections. Comorbidities are closely associated with HRV infections. These infections show seasonal variation, with predominance during colder seasons.

KEYWORDS
Human rhinovirus; Acute respiratory infections; Respiratory virus

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