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Neotropical Entomology, Volume: 40, Issue: 1, Published: 2011
  • From the Phylogeny of the Satyrinae Butterflies to the Systematics of Euptychiina (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): History, Progress and Prospects Forum

    Marín, MA; Peña, C; Freitas, AVL; Wahlberg, N; Uribe, SI

    Abstract in English:

    We review the various proposals of evolutionary and classification schemes for Satyrinae and particularly Euptychiina butterflies, assessing progress and prospects of research for the group. Among the highlights is the proposal to include Morphini, Brassolini and Amathusiini as part of Satyrinae. Although it is clear that this hypothesis requires further investigation, phylogenetic studies recently conducted recover this clade as part of Satyrinae with high support. The phylogenetic analyses for Euptychiina carried out to date recover the monophyly of the group and have identified a variety of genera as non-monophyletic. Further work is necessary to resolve the position of the subtribe and the evolutionary relationships of several genera.
  • Rearing Technique and Biological Traits of Atheloca subrufella (Hulst) (Lepidoptera: Phyci.. dae) in Coconut Fruits

    Santana, SWJ; Barros, R; Torres, JB; Gondim Jr, MGC

    Abstract in English:

    Rearing Technique and Biological Traits of Atheloca subrufella (Hulst) (Lepidoptera: Phycitidae) in Coconut Fruits. Larvae of the coconut moth Atheloca subrufella (Hulst) develop in flowers and fruits of coconut, Cocos nucifera, causing precocious abscission of these structures and, hence, yield decrease. This work studied a feasible and suitable rearing technique for A. subrufella using fruits of coconut. We first determined the appropriate density of larvae to be reared per coconut fruit (among two, three, four or five larvae) and later tested the suitability of this rearing technique for three successive generations. The storage of egg and pupal stages during 0, 5, 10 and 20 days was also studied at 12ºC. Based on the fertility life table parameters, the best results were achieved by rearing two or three larvae per fruit as they yielded the best net reproductive rate and intrinsic rate of population increase. In addition, eggs and pupae of A. subrufella can be stored at 12ºC up to five days with viability higher than 90%. Adult moths emerged from pupae stored for five days at 12ºC produced an average of 219.4 eggs and lived 18.8 days. Storage periods for eggs and pupae over 10 days significantly reduced egg viability and adult fecundity, respectively. Thus, the technique in here described was shown to be suitable for the continuous rearing of A. subrufella in laboratory conditions.
  • Composition, Abundance and Richness of Sarcophagidae (Diptera: Oestroidea) in Forests and Forest Gaps with Different Vegetation Cover Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Sousa, JRP de; Esposito, MC; Carvalho Filho, FS

    Abstract in English:

    This study was carried out in the Base Operacional Geólogo Pedro de Moura (BOGPM) in the Urucu River Basin, Coari, state of Amazonas, Brazil, during April, June, and October 2007, in 16 areas, 4 in primary forests (environment MT) and 12 in gaps (environments C1, C2, and C3) at different stages of vegetation recovery, with different plant cover height. We collected 3,547 specimens of flesh flies. The 3,525 individuals identified to species level included 10 genera, 6 subgenera, and 23 species. Sarcodexia lambens (Wiedemann) (47.1%) and Peckia (Peckia) chrysostoma (Wiedemann) (19.1%) were the most abundant species. The abundance patterns and estimated richness differed between the environments, and were separated in two groups, one of the gaps (C1, C2, and C3) and another of forests (MT). Both abundance and estimated richness were higher in the gaps (C1, C2, and C3) than in the forest (MT).
  • Resistance to Chalkbrood Disease in Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Colonies with Different Hygienic Behaviour Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Invernizzi, C; Rivas, F; Bettucci, L

    Abstract in English:

    Chalkbrood disease affects the larvae of honeybees Apis mellifera L. and is caused by the fungus Ascosphaera apis. Infected larvae die when they are stretched in the cap cell and suffer a gradual hardening that ends in a very hard structure (mummie). Several studies have demonstrated that colonies that express an efficient hygienic behaviour (uncapping of cell and subsequent removal of dead brood) exhibit a higher resistance to the disease. However, it remains unclear whether the advantage of hygienic colonies over less hygienic ones lies in the ability to remove mummies or in the early detection of infected larvae and its cannibalization before they harden. To elucidate this aspect, the hygienic behaviour of 24 colonies, which were subsequently provided with pollen cakes containig A. apis, was evaluated. The number of mummies and the number of partially cannibalized and whole larvae in uncapped cells were recorded. The most hygienic colonies controlled the disease better. These colonies also had a higher tendency to uncap cells that contained infected larvae and cannibalize them. The presence of A. apis in partially cannibalized and whole larvae in uncapped cells indicate that the advantage of hygienic colonies over less hygienic ones lies in the early detection of infected larvae death and their quick removal from the cell before they become mummies.
  • Survivorship and Egg Production of Phytophagous Pentatomids in Laboratory Rearing Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Silva, FAC; Calizotti, GS; Panizzi, AR

    Abstract in English:

    Survivorship and reproductive performance of the pentatomids Euschistus heros (F.) (EH), Nezara viridula (L.) (NV), and Dichelops melacanthus (Dallas) (DM) were tested in the laboratory. A mixture of natural foods (pods of green beans, Phaseolus vulgaris, raw shelled peanuts, Arachis hypogaea, and fruits of privet, Ligustrum lucidum, and 50 pairs/box (25 x 20 x 20 cm) were used, observed for 30 days, and replicated three times. Thirty days after emergence, mean female survivorship was 91% (EH), 60% (NV), and 30% (DM). More egg masses were deposited during 11-20 days after emergence, with mean number of 45.1 (EH), 5.3 (NV), and 11.8 (DM). These values were smaller during the first 10 days (25.5, 2.1, and 4.7) and last 10 days (21-30 days) (39.4, 3.9, and 4.9), respectively. Mean maximum number of eggs/day was 489 (EH) on day 29, 474 (NV) on day 11, and 153 (DM) on day 14. Mean monthly fecundity (egg masses/box) was 985 (EH), 92 (NV), and 193 (DM), and mean number of eggs/box was 8,480; 5,147, and 2,042.7, respectively.
  • Termites as Bioindicators of Habitat Quality in the Caatinga, Brazil: Is There Agreement Between Structural Habitat Variables and the Sampled Assemblages? Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Alves, W de F; Mota, AS; Lima, RAA de; Bellezoni, R; Vasconcellos, A

    Abstract in English:

    The composition of termite assemblages was analyzed in three caatinga sites of the Estação Ecológica do Seridó, located in the municipality of Serra Negra do Norte, in the state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. These sites have been subjected to selective logging, and cleared for pasture and farming. A standardized sampling protocol for termite assemblages (30h/person/site) was conducted between September 2007 and February 2009. At each site we measured environmental variables, such as soil pH and organic matter, necromass stock, vegetation height, stem diameter at ankle height (DAH) and the largest and the smallest crown width. Ten species of termites, belonging to eight genera and three families, were found at the three experimental sites. Four feeding groups were sampled: wood-feeders, soil-feeders, wood-soil interface feeders and leaf-feeders. The wood-feeders were dominant in number of species and number of encounters at all sites. In general, the sites were not significantly different in relation to the environmental variables measured. The same pattern was observed for termite assemblages, where no significant differences in species richness, relative abundance and taxonomic and functional composition were observed between the three sites. The agreement between composition of assemblages and environmental variables reinforces the potential of termites as biological indicators of habitat quality.
  • Pollen Analysis Reveals Plants Foraged by Africanized Honeybees in the Southern Pantanal, Brazil Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Boff, S; Luz, CFP; Araujo, AC; Pott, A

    Abstract in English:

    The pollen diet of Africanized honeybees Apis mellifera L. was studied during seven months (October 2006 to April 2007) in a natural forest fragment in the southern Pantanal, sub-region of Abobral, Mato Grosso do Sul. The analysis of the pollen diet was based on direct observations of the bees visiting flowers as well as through the use of a pollen trap installed in a wild colony in a tree hole in the same forest fragment. The total of 28 species in 15 botanical families were observed as potential sources of pollen for A. mellifera, with visits registered in 24 of these species in 13 botanical families. In the pollen trap we recorded 25 pollen types. This study is the first report to use this type of trap for pollen collection in the Neotropical region and aimed to identify the polliniferous bee plants of Brazilian pantanal.
  • The Natural History of Nest Defence in a Stingless Bee, Tetragonisca angustula (Latreille) (Hymenoptera: Apidae), with Two Distinct Types of Entrance Guards Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Grüter, C; Kärcher, MH; Ratnieks, FLW

    Abstract in English:

    The stingless bee Tetragonsica angustula (Latreille) is the only social bee known that has two different types of nest entrance guards. As in other stingless bees and the honey bee one type stands on, in or near the nest entrance. The second type, so far only known in T. angustula, hovers near the nest entrance. In order to gain further understanding of this unique situation we studied guarding behaviour in both types of guards. Using marked bees, we found that individual worker bees guarded for a long time, up to 20 days, relative to their short, average c. 21 day, lifespan. Relatively few, 33%, individually marked guards were seen performing both types of guarding. The others only acted as standing guards. The bees that did perform both types did so over similar periods of their life. Hovering bouts were 57 min long, interrupted by breaks inside the hive of a few minutes (3.3 ± 1.5 min). Standing bouts were slightly longer (74 min) and also interrupted by short breaks (7.82 ± 6.45 min). Human breath, mimicking a vertebrate intruder, caused the guards to retreat into the nest rather than to attack the intruder. Some colonies protected themselves against intruders by closing the entrance during the night (32% and 56% of colonies during two nights). In summary, our results indicate that nest entrance guarding in T. angustula involves division of labour between the two types, in which most guarding individuals only act as standing guards.
  • Distribution and Habitat in Mexico of Dactylopius Costa (Hemiptera: Dactylopiidae) and their Cacti Hosts (Cactaceae: Opuntioideae) Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Chávez-Moreno, CK; Tecante, A; Casas, A; Claps, LE

    Abstract in English:

    The distribution pattern of species of the genus Dactylopius Costa in Mexico was analyzed in relation to the distribution of their host plants (subfamily Opuntioideae) to evaluate the specificity of the insect-host association. The distribution of Dactylopius currently recognized is narrower than that of its hosts and probably is not representative. Therefore, a broader distribution of the Dactylopius species in correspondence with those of their hosts was hypothesized. Insects and their hosts were collected and georeferenced in 14 states of Mexico from 2005 to 2007. The distribution areas, maps, and habitat characteristics of Dactylopius, Opuntia sensu stricto, Nopalea and Cylindropuntia were determined on the basis of field collections and examination of museum collections. This information was complemented with information from the exhaustive examination of microscope slides from a local insect collection, plants from local herbaria, and literature reviews. The current distribution of the genus Dactylopius and its hosts included 22 and 25 states of Mexico, respectively, and Dactylopius had a continuous distribution according to its hosts, broader than recognized hitherto. The new georeferenced records of the five Mexican Dactylopius species are reported. Insects with morphological characteristics of D. confusus combined with those of D. salmianus were identified, as well as insects with characteristics of D. opuntiae combined with those of D. salmianus. These records suggest that the number of local Dactylopius species could be higher than previously thought or that possible new processes of hybridization between native and introduced species may be occurring.
  • Proboscis Length and Resource Utilization in Two Uruguayan Bumblebees: Bombus atratus Franklin and Bombus bellicosus Smith (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Arbulo, N; Santos, E; Salvarrey, S; Invernizzi, C

    Abstract in English:

    Bumblebees (Bombus sp.) are eusocial insects with an annual life cycle whose use as pollinator of crops has gained great importance in modern agriculture. Several authors have found that resource use in Bombus species is usually based on the correlation between the proboscis length of the bumblebees and the corolla depth of the flowers. The aim of this study was to determine proboscis length of Bombus atratus and B. bellicosus, two Uruguayan bumblebees, and verify the resource exploitation testing two cultivated species, the red clover and the bird's foot trefoil. Bumblebee foraging activity was recorded in two culture conditions: in a red clover and bird's foot trefoil mixed meadow, and in contiguous plots of these legumes, and the proboscis length of collected foragers was determined. Both species of bumblebees exploited red clover and bird's foot trefoil although they did it in different proportions in all instances tested. The results indicated that the choice of the resources in B. atratus and B. bellicosus was influenced by their proboscis length. Bombus atratus has a longer proboscis and preferably visited red clover, possibly obtaining nectar easier and faster than B. bellicosus, which has a shorter proboscis. Bombus bellicosus used both resources without any clear preference.
  • Resource Defense Polygyny by Hetaerina rosea Selys (Odonata: Calopterygidae): Influence of Age and Wing Pigmentation Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Guillermo-Ferreira, R; Del-Claro, K

    Abstract in English:

    Current evidence suggests that in Hetaerina damselflies males exhibit lek mating system. In this study, in order to answer if the same occurs in Hetaerina rosea Selys, we manipulated vegetation substrates used as territories and quantified the number of visiting females, males defending territories and fight intensity. We also examined whether body size and wing pigmentation are selectable traits in male-male competition, and if age affects male territorial behavior. Our results showed that males with larger pigmented areas won more contests, independently of body size. Old males changed from territoriality to sneaking strategy. Contrary to other Hetaerina species, males of H. rosea do not display lek behavior, but defend resources according to the resource defense polygyny strategy.
  • A New Species of Alucita L. (Lepidoptera: Alucitidae) from Northern Chile Systematics, Morphology And Physiology

    Vargas, HA

    Abstract in English:

    Male and female adults of a new species of Alucita L. (Lepidoptera: Alucitidae) are described and illustrated from the Azapa Valley, northern Chile. Immature stages are associated with fruit of "chuve", Tecoma fulva (Cav.) D. Don. (Bignoniaceae). This is the first species of Alucitidae described from Chile.
  • Ovary Development and Maturation in Nezara viridula (L.) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) Systematics, Morphology And Physiology

    Fortes, P; Salvador, G; Cônsoli, FL

    Abstract in English:

    Ovary development and maturation of Nezara viridula (L.) were evaluated by examining ovariole morphology and the alterations in the biochemical (protein synthesis related to reproduction) composition of the hemolymph. Quantitative and qualitative protein analyses were performed and ovary structural alterations for the pre-reproductive and reproductive stages were recorded. Total concentration of proteins in female hemolymph gradually increased until the end of the pre-mating stage, remaining unaltered thereafter. Proteins linked to reproduction (vitellogenins) appeared in the hemolymph 10 days after adult emergence and indicated the end of the pre-mating stage. After mating, total protein concentration in the hemolymph was lower compared to virgin females; vitellogenin levels were similar during most of the observation period. Oocyte development and maturation were gradual and age dependent. Ten-day-old females had chorionated oocytes ready for fertilization. Mating did not stimulate oocyte development in N. viridula, but the lack of mating activity appeared to have stimulated oocyte resorption in 17-day-old females.
  • Morphometric Analysis of Populations of Centris aenea Lepeletier (Hymenoptera: Apidae) from Northeastern Brazil Systematics, Morphology And Physiology

    Ferreira, VS; Aguiar, CML; Costa, MA; Silva, JG

    Abstract in English:

    Centris aenea Lepeletier is a solitary bee that has raised interest in management to pollinate crops, such as acerola, Malpighia emarginata. This study investigated the level of morphometric variability among populations of C. aenea from Northeastern Brazil. Traditional and geometric morphometric analyses were used. Head length, leg length, wing length, and wing shape were measured in samples (5-10 females) from eight localities. We did not find statistically significant differences among the populations (P > 0.01). The partial wing warps were similar in the populations and indicated that the bees were not morphometrically different. Our results suggest that C. aenea shows low population morphometric variability and highlight the need for further investigations on population variation in this species, preferably including populations sampled at the extremes of their geographic distribution. Significant insight into the population variation of C. aenea will probably require the use of molecular markers to allow a comparative approach between morphometric variability and genetic variability.
  • Characteristics of the Male Reproductive System and Spermatozoa of Leptophlebiidae (Ephemeroptera) Systematics, Morphology And Physiology

    Brito, P; Salles, FF; Dolder, H

    Abstract in English:

    This study describes morphological changes in the male reproductive system of Miroculis amazonicus (Savage & Peters) from mature nymphs to subimago stages. The sperm ultrastructure of Massartela brieni (Lestage), Farrodes carioca (Domínguez et al) and Miroculis mourei (Savage & Peters), as well as aspects of cell fragments observed in these species' subimagos deferent ducts were described. Sperm from the three species studied are aflagellated and immotile, while those from F. carioca and Ma. brieni are approximately spherical with a homogenous nucleus and acrosome. Sperm of F. carioca present two or three mitochondria located between the nucleus and the acrosome. In Ma. brieni, only one lateral mitochondria was found. Sperm from Mi. mourei are shaped as a number 'eight', with electron lucent spots inside the nucleus and two mitochondria above the acrosome. Large cell fragments containing degenerative vesicles and some sperm were observed in the deferent duct lumen of the three species. Testes of Mi. amazonicus are extremely reduced in the subimago stage, which suggests that these cell fragments originated from testes degeneration.
  • A New Generic Synonymy for Leptophlebiidae (Ephemeroptera) from Patagonia, and Descriptions of Female and Subimagos of Dactylophlebia carnulenta Pescador & Peters Systematics, Morphology And Physiology

    Pessacq, P

    Abstract in English:

    Specimens of Dactylophlebia carnulenta Pescador & Peters, only known from nymphal stage, were collected and reared in situ. From the material obtained, Archethraulodes spatulus Pescador & Peters, known from male imago and the only known species for the genus, is proposed as junior synonymy with D. carnulenta. Additionally, female imago and subimagos of D. carnulenta are described.
  • Effects of Food Deprivation on the Development of Coleomegilla maculata (De Geer) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Biological Control

    Santos-Cividanes, TM; Anjos, ACR dos; Cividanes, FJ; Dias, PC

    Abstract in English:

    The lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata (De Geer) is a natural enemy of several insect pests and feeds on pollen and nectar to survive periods when prey is scarce. The effect of the feeding interval on the development, survival, fecundity, and longevity of C. maculata was determined. Newly hatched larvae of C. maculata were reared individually and fed with eggs of the Mediterranean flour moth Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller) at intervals of one, two, and three days under controlled conditions (23 ± 1ºC; 60 ± 10% RH; 12 h phtophase). The duration of larval instars and the total larval stage was prolonged as the feeding interval increased. The larval period lasted on average 9.2 ± 0.19 days when the larvae were fed daily with prey, and 14.6 ± 0.48 days when food was offered at three-day intervals. There was an inverse relationship between food intervals, survival, and weight of larvae and adults of the coccinellid. Survival rate of larvae fed daily was 76.8%, while the rate was 50.0% and 23.4% for larvae fed every two and three days, respectively. Coleomegilla maculata showed fecundity of 781.1 ± 149.02, 563.4 ± 80.81 and 109.0 ± 103.0 eggs when fed daily and at intervals of two and three days, respectively.
  • Resistance of Soybean Genotypes to Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) Biotype B (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Pest Management

    Vieira, SS; Bueno, AF; Boff, MIC; Bueno, RCOF; Hoffman-Campo, CB

    Abstract in English:

    The silverleaf whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) biotype B has become a serious problem for soybean cultivation because it can significantly reduce soybean productivity. The use of soybean cultivars resistant to whitefly attack is an important strategy in an integrated pest management (IPM) program. This study evaluated the preference for oviposition and colonization by B. tabaci biotype B on different soybean genotypes. In the free-choice test, the genotypes studied were 'IAC 17' and 'IAC 19' as the standards for resistance and 'IAC Holambra Stwart' as the standard for susceptibility, as well as BABR01-0492, BABR01-0173, BABR01-1259, BABR01-1576, BABR99-4021HC, BABR99-4021HP, 'Barreiras', 'Conquista', 'Corisco', 'BRS Gralha', PI274454, PI227687, and PI171451. In the no-choice test, the four best genotypes selected in the free-choice test, in addition to the susceptible and resistant standards were evaluated. Our data indicated 'Barreiras' as the most resistant genotype against B. tabaci biotype B. 'BRS Gralha', which was the least attractive to whitefly adults in the free-choice test, did not show resistance to insect attack when they were confined in cages in the no-choice test. Despite the high number of eggs observed, BABR01-1576 and BABR99-4021HC showed a reduced number of nymphs, indicating antibiosis. The genotypes with a high level of resistance can be used as a tool against B. tabaci in IPM or as a source of resistance in plant-breeding programs.
  • Plant Extracts as an Alternative to Control Leucoptera coffeella (Guérin-Mèneville) (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae) Pest Management

    Alves, DS; Oliveira, DF; Carvalho, GA; Santos Jr, HM dos; Carvalho, DA; Santos, MAI; Carvalho, HWP de

    Abstract in English:

    We evaluated the effects of crude extracts from the plantain Plantago lanceolata and the bitter gourd Momordica charantia on the oviposition preference and development of the coffee leaf miner Leucoptera coffeella Guérin-Mèneville & Perrottet under laboratory and/or greenhouse conditions. The ovicidal effects of these extracts were also studied in a greenhouse. Plantago lanceolata and M. charantia extracts also underwent fractionation directed by oviposition tests with the coffee leaf miner. The extracts of both plants reduced L. coffeella oviposition and egg hatching, apparently as a result of action of plant metabolites on the embryo. Adults originating from eggs treated with the extracts exhibited similar survival rates, but a higher female/male ratio. Fecundity was reduced for females obtained from eggs treated with the M. charantia extract. Partial chemical analysis indicated that both extracts produced polar fractions that reduced the oviposition of L. coffeella on coffee leaves under laboratory conditions. The extracts of P. lanceolata and M. charantia have potential for use in the development of new products to control the coffee leaf miner.
  • Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Methoxyfenozide on the Development, Survival and Reproduction of the Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Pest Management

    Zarate, N; Díaz, O; Martínez, AM; Figueroa, JI; Schneider, MI; Smagghe, G; Viñuela, E; Budia, F; Pineda, S

    Abstract in English:

    The lethal and sublethal effects of the ecdysone agonist methoxyfenozide on the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), were investigated by feeding a methoxyfenozide-treated diet to fifth instars until pupation in doses corresponding to the LC10 and LC25 for the compound. Larval mortality reached 8% and 26% in the low and high concentration groups, respectively, on the seventh day of the experiment. A progressive larval mortality of 12% for the LC10 and 60% for the LC25 was observed before pupation. Treated larvae exhibited lower pupal weights, higher pupal mortality, presence of deformed pupae, and more deformed adults than untreated larvae. The incorporation of methoxyfenozide into the diet had a significant effect on the timing of larval development. The development period for males and females was about seven days longer than the controls for both concentrations tested. In contrast, the compound affected neither pupae nor adult longevity. Finally, S. frugiperda adults that resulted from fifth instars treated with methoxyfenozide were not affected in their mean cumulative number of eggs laid per female (fecundity), nor percentages of eggs hatched (fertility), or the sex ratio. Our results suggest that the combination of lethal and sublethal effects of methoxyfenozide may have important implications for the population dynamics of the fall armyworm.
  • Temperature Effects on the Immature Development Time of Culex eduardoi Casal & García (Diptera: Culicidae) Public Health

    Loetti, V; Schweigmann, NJ; Burroni, NE

    Abstract in English:

    The effect of constant temperatures on the development time from first instar to adult emergence was studied in Culex eduardoi Casal & García reared at 7, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 or 33°C. Data were adjusted to the linear degree-day model and the nonlinear Briére model. According to the linear model, the development time was inversely related to the rearing temperatures between 7°C and 25°C. Maximum mortality (100%) was recorded at temperatures > 30°C. According to the linear model, the development threshold temperature and thermal constant were 5.7°C and 188.8 degree days, respectively. The lower and upper threshold temperatures and the optimum temperature for the nonlinear model were -2.3, 30.0 and 28.1°C, respectively.
  • Occurrence of Ornithodoros brasiliensis Aragão (Acari: Argasidae) in São Francisco de Paula, RS, Southern Brazil Scientific Notes

    Martins, JR; Doyle, RL; Barros-Battesti, DM; Onofrio, VC; Guglielmone, AA

    Abstract in English:

    There have been no reports of the endemic Ornithodoros brasiliensis (Aragão) in Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil, since the 1950s. In January 2007, 21 O. brasiliensis ticks were collected in a rural area named "Cruzinha" in the municipality of São Francisco de Paula, RS, and another population was sampled later that year (October) in Vargem do Cedro, another rural area of São Francisco de Paula, following reports of human parasitism by ticks. The reappearance of this tick is a reason for concern in terms of public health.
  • First Record of Culex (Culex) brethesi (Dyar) (Diptera: Culicidae) in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil Scientific Notes

    Cardoso, J da C; Paula, MB de; Fernandes, A; Santos, E dos; Almeida, MAB de; Fonseca, DF da; Sallum, MAM

    Abstract in English:

    This is the first record of Culex (Culex) brethesi (Dyar) in Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. The species was identified from specimens collected in a sand bar vegetation with the aid of a Nasci's trap, during an expedition for surveillance of the West Nile Virus in July of 2006, in the city of Mostardas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
  • First Record of Aquanirmus major Cicchino & González Acuña (Phthiraptera: Philopteridae) on the Great Grebe, Podiceps major Boddaert (Aves: Podicipedidae) in Brazil Scientific Notes

    Dantas-Torres, F; Vieira, G

    Abstract in English:

    This report is the first record of a species of Aquanirmus in Brazil and it increases the known geographical distribution of A. major Cicchino & González Acuña, a species recently described based on material collected in Argentina and Chile.
  • Myiasis by Screw Worm Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a Wild Maned Wolf Chrysocyon brachyurus (Mammalia: Canidae), in Brasília, Brazil Scientific Notes

    Cansi, ER; Bonorino, R; Ataíde, HS; Pujol-Luz, JR

    Abstract in English:

    In April 2009, a wild maned wolf, Chrysocyon brachyurus, was captured in an area of cerrado in Brasília, DF, Brazil, with screw worm maggots in external wounds. Fifty larvae were bred in the laboratory and eight adults of Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) emerged 10 days after pupation. This is the first report of a myiasis by C. hominivorax in a free-living maned wolf in Brazil.
  • Stigmella epicosma (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae): First Distribution Records from Chile and First Host Plant Record Scientific Notes

    Vargas, HA

    Abstract in English:

    The presence of Stigmella epicosma (Meyrick) is reported for the first time from two coastal valleys from northern Chile: Azapa and Chaca. Adults examined were reared from leafminer larvae on Trixis cacalioides (Asteraceae), the first host plant known for S. epicosma.
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