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Neotropical Entomology, Volume: 40, Issue: 2, Published: 2011
  • Climate change and its effects on terrestrial insects and herbivory patterns Forum

    Cornelissen, T

    Abstract in English:

    Climate change and extreme weather events affect plants and animals and the direct impact of anthropogenic climate change has been documented extensively over the past years. In this review, I address the main consequences of elevated CO2 and O3 concentrations, elevated temperature and changes in rainfall patterns on the interactions between insects and their host plants. Because of their tight relationship with host plants, insect herbivores are expected to suffer direct and indirect effects of climate change through the changes experienced by their host plants, with consequences to population dynamics, community structure and ecosystem functioning.
  • Wolbachia screening in spiders and assessment of horizontal transmission between predator and prey Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Yun, Y; Peng, Y; Liu, FX; Lei, C

    Abstract in English:

    Recent studies have revealed that the prevalence of Wolbachia in arthropods is attributable not only to its vertical transmission, but also to its horizontal transfer. In order to assess the horizontal transmission of Wolbachia between predator and prey, arthropods belonging to 11 spider families and six insect families were collected in the same field of rice. The distribution of Wolbachia in these arthropods was detected by diagnostic PCR amplification of the wsp (Wolbachia outer surface protein gene) and 16S rDNA genes. Nurscia albofasciata Strand (Araneae: Titanoecidae), Propylea japonica Thunberg (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), Paederus fuscipes Curtis (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae), and Nilaparvata lugens Stal (Homoptera: Delphacidae) were infected with Wolbachia. This is the first report of infection of N. albofasciata and P. fuscipes by Wolbachia. No direct evidence indicated the existence of horizontal transmission of Wolbachia between predator and prey.
  • Feeding patterns of the aquatic grasshopper Cornops aquaticum (Bruner) (Orthoptera: Acrididae) in the middle Paraná river, Argentina Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Capello, S; de Wysiecki, ML; Marchese, M

    Abstract in English:

    The aquatic grasshopper Cornops aquaticum (Bruner) is native to South America and inhabits lowlands from southern Mexico to Central Argentina and Uruguay. This grasshopper is host-specific to aquatic plants of the genera Eichhornia and Pontederia. The objectives of this study were to analyze the feeding patterns of the aquatic grasshopper C. aquaticum in relationship to development stages and sex and to determine the food consumption rate in their host plant, Eichhornia crassipes. Samples were collected from April 2006 to May 2007 in different floodplain lakes of the Middle Parana River. The average consumption was greater in the females (0.127 g food/day ± 0.051) than in the males (0.060 g food/day ± 0.025). The feces of 361 nymphs and adults of this locust were examined and the most common tissue fragments found were of the water hyacinth (E. crassipes). In the initial nymphal stages (I, II and III), an exclusive consumption of E. crassipes was registered, while in the IV and V stages the choice included also other macrophytes. In summary, C. aquaticum presents polyphagy in the field, feeding on six macrophytes of different classes and families.
  • The importance of odor in nest site selection by a lodger bee, Centris Bicornuta Mocsáry (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in the dry forest of Costa Rica Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Vinson, SB; Frankie, GW; Rao, A

    Abstract in English:

    The more common lodger bee occurring in the dry forest of Costa Rica, Centris bicornuta Muscáry), has been observed nesting in new nest cavities drilled into wooden blocks placed next to cavities used by another female within 2-3 days. In contrast, new nest cavities placed in similar areas with no nesting Centris nearby were not used for weeks. These observations suggest that the presence of nesting bees may play a role in nest site selection. To confirm our observations, new nest cavities were placed in areas with or without nesting. We found nest initiation in newly placed nest cavities only in areas where bees were actively nesting. To examine the possibility that nesting locations are not unique, we placed new nest cavities in new locations either with (a) a number of completed nest cavities or (b) placed alone. Within three days we only found bees nesting in the newly placed nest cavities in situation "a". The results suggested that odor might be involved. We next compared nesting in new cavities placed alone with cavities contaminated with either (a) nest entrance plug material, (b) nest nectar, (c) nest pollen or (d) a combination of pollen and nectar. Nesting was significantly low in cavities placed next to cavities with nest entrance plug material (a), and high in cavities placed next to cavities "b, c, or d". The results suggest that pollen and /or nectar odor play a role in the location of potential nest sites.
  • Population dynamics, life stage and ecological modeling in Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Rosa, GS; Costa, MIS; Corrente, JE; Silveira, LVA; Godoy, WAC

    Abstract in English:

    In this study we investigated the population dynamics of Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann) with laboratory experiments, employing survival analysis and stage structure mathematical models, emphasizing survival among life stages. The study also assessed the theoretical influence of density dependence and cannibalism during immature stages, on the population dynamics of the species. The survival curves were similar, indicating that populations of C. albiceps exhibit the same pattern of survival among life stages. A strong nonlinear trend was observed, suggesting density dependence, acting during the first life stages of C. albiceps. The time-series simulations produced chaotic oscillations for all life stages, and the cannibalism did not produce qualitative changes in the dynamic behavior. The bifurcation analysis shows that for low values for survival, the population reaches a stable equilibrium, but the cannibalism results in chaotic oscillations practically over all the parametric space. The implications of the patterns of dynamic behavior observed are discussed.
  • Postembryonic development and food consumption of Dichroplus elongatus Giglio-Tos and Dichroplus maculipennis (Blanchard) (Orhtoptera: Acrididae: Melanoplinae) under laboratory conditions Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Mariottini, Y; de Wysiecki, ML; Lange, CE

    Abstract in English:

    Dichroplus maculipennis (Blanchard) and D. elongatus Giglio-Tos are two of the most important melanoplines in Argentina, both ecologically and economically. The postembryonic development and forage loss (consumption of Bromus brevis Ness + fallen material) caused by older nymphs (instars IV, V, VI) and adults of both species were studied under controlled conditions (30ºC, 14L:10D, 40% RH). Five nymphal instars were recorded in D. elongatus, and six in D. maculipennis. Total nymphal development was similar in both species (D. elongatus: 32 ± 0.70 days; D. maculipennis: 34.5 ± 0.37 days). Daily consumption increased from nymphal instars to pre-reproductive adult stage. In both species, pre-reproductive females had higher consumption rates than other stages considered (D. elongatus: 30.6 ± 0.56 mg dry weight/day; D. maculipennis: 48.7 ± 0.74 mg dry weight/day). In the reproductive stage, consumption decreased significantly in both sexes. When feeding, D. maculipennis let some plant material to drop, increasing total loss. The percentage of fallen material was greater in reproductive adults, representing 3.9% and 2.9% of the total daily loss for males and females, respectively. Females and males of D. maculipennis were heavier than those of D. elongatus (P < 0.05), and daily consumption was significantly higher (P < 0.05). Regardless sex and reproductive status, adults of D. maculipennis consumed 29.1 ± 0.64 mg dry weight/day on average, while one of D. elongatus 20.0 ± 0.3 mg dry weight/ day.
  • Duration of feeding and superficial and in-depth damage to soybean seed by selected species of stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) Ecology, Behavior And Bionomics

    Depieri, RA; Panizzi, AR

    Abstract in English:

    Laboratory studies were conducted to compare duration of feeding and superficial and in-depth damage to soybean (Glycine max) seeds by the Southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (L.), the Neotropical brown stink bug, Euschistus heros (F.), the red-banded stink bug, Piezodorus guildinii (Westwood), and the green-belly stink bug, Dichelops melacanthus (Dallas). Results indicated that feeding time was significantly longer for N. viridula (≈ 133 min) compared to E. heros and D. melacanthus (≈ 70 min), but not different from P. guildinii (≈ 103 min). There was a positive correlation between feeding time and the resulting damage for E. heros, N. viridula and P. guildinii (R² > 0.80, P < 0.0001), but not for D. melacanthus (R² = 0.1011, P = 0.1493). The deepest seed damage (2.0 mm) was made by P. guildinii and the shallowest (0.5 mm) by D. melacanthus. The depth of the seed damage by E. heros and N. viridula (0.8, 1.2 mm, respectively) was intermediate in comparison to the other species studied. Feeding damage to the seed endosperm caused variable cell disruption and protein body dissolution, particularly when P. guildinii fed on seeds, suggesting that the deleterious action of salivary enzymes was greater for this bug compared to the others.
  • Population genetic structure of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) utilizing microsatellite markers

    Valle, GE do; Zucchi, MI; Stabellini, NS; Lourenção, AL; Pinheiro, JB

    Abstract in English:

    We aimed to characterize the population genetic structure within and among five Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) populations collected from different host plants and geographic regions by using microssatelites as a molecular marker. Each population was represented by 19 specimens. The host plants and geographic origins of these populations were described as follows: Pop 1: Squash Barreiras (BA); Pop 2: Cotton Barreiras (BA); Pop 3: Soybean Campinas (SP); Pop 4: Tomato Cruz das Almas (BA); and Pop 5: Soybean Rondonópolis (MT). Six polymorphic loci were observed, which discriminated 31 different alleles in the studied populations, with a mean number of alleles per population of 3.30 (2.67 - 4.00). Using Fisher's Exact test, it was observed that at least three populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for most of the studied loci (six). The dendrogram (UPGMA) separated populations into groups mainly related to the geographic origin of the samples. Only population 5 differed from the others at a 0.15 distance (74.5% group consistency). The most similar populations were 1 and 2, with a 0.01 distance (65.3%). This is in agreement with their geographic origins and it was not consistent with host specificity. The results suggest considerable gene flow (7.3%) among all whitefly populations and indicate that a better understanding of the gene flow in populations of B. tabaci associated with different hosts is required for the management of this insect.
  • Morphometry and distribution of sensilla on the antennae of Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae) Systematics, Morphology And Physiology

    Bisotto-de-Oliveira, R; Redaelli, LR; Sant'ana, J

    Abstract in English:

    Antennal sensilla of Anastrepha fraterculus (Wied.) were examined using scanning electron microscopy. In the flagellum, there are trichoid, basiconic, clavate type I and II, and styloconic sensilla and microtrichia. Only microtrichiae and chaetica sensilla were observed in the scape and pedicel. The number of sensilla in the flagellum was similar between sexes. At the apex there was a higher density of trichoid and an absence of clavate sensilla, while basiconic sensilla were more abundant in the proximal region.
  • Phylogenetic relationships of the genus Hoplia Illiger (Scarabaeidae: Hopliinae) Systematics, Morphology And Physiology

    Carrillo-Ruiz, H; Morón, MA

    Abstract in English:

    Results of phylogenetic analysis based on 34 morphological characters of 24 species of 11 genera of Hopliinae from Europe, Japan, South Africa, Madagascar, North and Central America, indicates that the genus Hoplia is a monophyletic group with species distributed in Europe, Japan and America. Based in this analysis the Asiatic genus Ectinohoplia is the closest relative of the genus Hoplia, and the South American genus Barybas (Melolonthinae: Macrodactylini) is the sister group of Hopliinae.
  • Ultrastructural and functional aspects of the spermatheca in the american harlequin bug, Murgantia histrionica (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) Systematics, Morphology And Physiology

    Stacconi, MVR; Romani, R

    Abstract in English:

    The spermatheca of Murgantia histrionica (Hahn) was investigated using fluorescence, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The aim of the study was to elucidate the structure of this organ, pointing out differences between mated and unmated females. Results have shown an elaborated cuticular structure associated with muscular and glandular tissues. The spermatheca is joined with the common oviduct by the spermathecal duct, forming a thin saccular dilation through two consecutive invaginations. The distal part of the organ is formed by a series of two communicating cuticular chambers. The first cylindrical-shaped chamber, corresponding to the coiled region, is wrapped by longitudinal muscular fibers suspended between two cuticular flanges. The contractions of these fibers compress a deformable zone of the cylinder, pumping the sperm toward the spermathecal duct. Without contractions the cylinder results to be isolated from the proximal part of the spermatheca by means of a valve. The second chamber, corresponding to the spermatheca, is made of two parts: a truncated-conical sub chamber, with a constant cuticular thickness, bearing on itself the distal flange, where muscular fibers are attached. The second part is a bulb-like structure wrapped in a glandular epithelium. The secretory units are composed by two cells: a secretory cell and an associated duct cell. Every evacuating duct shows a little reservoir just after the terminal apparatus, and converge inside the distal bulb after a tortuous path. The functional implications of this structure in the reproductive biology of M. histrionica are discussed.
  • A new genus and species of Euptychiina (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) from southern Brazil Systematics, Morphology And Physiology

    Freitas, AVL; Mielke, OHH; Moser, A; Silva-Brandão, KL; Iserhard, CA

    Abstract in English:

    This paper describes a new genus and a new species of Euptychiina from open grassland habitats (campos de cima da serra) in southern Brazil. The systematic position of this new taxon is discussed based on morphological and molecular data, and it is considered sister to Taydebis Freitas. Since the campos vegetation is considered endangered due to anthropogenic activities, this butterfly species deserves attention and should be included in future conservation plans for this biome.
  • Influence of Diaphania hyalinata (L.) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) egg density on the parasitization capacity of Trichogramma exiguum Pinto & Platner and Trichogramma pretiosum Riley (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae)

    Polanczyk, RA; Barbosa, WF; Celestino, FN; Pratissoli, D; Holtz, AM; Milanez, AM; Cocheto, JG; Silva, AF da

    Abstract in English:

    The effects of the egg density of Diaphania hyalinata (L.) on several biological parameters of Trichogramma exiguum Pinto & Platner and T. pretiosum Riley were investigated. For that, 24h-old egg masses were isolated in glass tubes (15 replicates; 1 egg mass = 1 replicate), and offered to parasitization by a newly-emerged female of T. pretiosum or T. exiguum 24h at the proportion of one female to 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 eggs of D. hyalinata. The following parameters were evaluated: number of parasitized eggs, number of individuals per egg, viability and sex ratio. Trichogramma exiguum parasitized more eggs than T. pretiosum when more than 25 eggs were available per female. The percentage of emergence was satisfactory to T. pretiosum in densities up to 15 eggs/female and up to 20 eggs/female for T. exiguum. The number of individuals per egg was not statistically different in both species except in the density of 25 eggs/female. It can be concluded that T. exiguum performed better than T. pretiosum at larger clutch sizes, as T. exiguum parasitization capacity increased as a result of the size of the host clutch size.
  • Laboratory and field evaluation of Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae for controlling subterranean termites Biological Control

    Hussain, A; Ahmed, S; Shahid, M

    Abstract in English:

    The efficacy of the Metarhizium anisopliae strain ARSEF 6911 was determined in the laboratory and field against two sugarcane pests, Microtermes obesi Holmgren and Odontotermes obesus Rambur (Termitidae: Isoptera). The susceptibility of both termite species to different conidial suspensions (1 × 10(10), 1 × 10(8), 1 × 10(6) and 1 × 10(4) conidia/ml) was determined in laboratory. All conidial suspensions were able to induce mortality. Termite mortality caused by the fungal suspensions was dose dependent. There were no significant differences in the LT50 values between species. Field evaluation of M. anisopliae alone or in combination with diesel oil and thiamethoxam was carried out in two growing seasons (autumn 2005 and spring 2006) at two sites located in Punjab, Pakistan. Dipping the sugarcane setts in these suspensions was tried to determine their effects on germination and percentage of bud damage to sugarcane setts. All treatments significantly reduced termite infestation compared to the untreated control. The combined treatment of M. anisopliae and diesel oil significantly reduced insect damage by attaining higher germination > 55% and lower bud damage < 5.50% at both sites in both seasons. The results suggest that the application of M. anisopliae and diesel oil in combination might be a useful treatment option for the management of termites in sugarcane.
  • Effect of the populations of Alabama argillacea (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on cotton crop at two sowing distances

    Helman, SA; Beltran, RE; Garay, F; Raña, E

    Abstract in English:

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the incidence of damage by the leafworm Alabama argillacea (Hübner) on yields of cotton grown under rows spaced 0.38 m and 0.76 m at the irrigation area of Santiago del Estero, Argentina. The period evaluated was extended from first flower to first open boll. Treatments were T1 - without control of larvae, T2 - with control of larvae, T3 - control since first flower to the end of effective blooming, and T4 - with larval control since the end of effective blooming to first open boll. The effect of injuries on the crop was evaluated trough boll cotton yield. Larvae were sampled in a weekly basis and insects were present from the first flower until harvest. Populations of A. argillacea decreased crop yields in the two distances tested, by decreasing the weight or number of open bolls.
  • Sequential sampling of Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Frankliniella schultzei Trybom (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on cotton crop Pest Management

    Fernandes, MG; Spessoto, RR; Degrande, PE; Rodrigues, TR

    Abstract in English:

    The goal of this research was to use the sequential probability ratio test to establish a sequential sampling plan for Aphis gossypii Glover and Frankliniella schultzei Trybom infesting cotton. Field work was conducted at the agricultural experimental station of the Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados during the 2003/2004 and 2004/2005 agricultural years. Aphid colonies and individual thrips in the sampling area were counted and their numbers were recorded. The spatial distribution pattern of A. gossypii and F. schultzei in the cotton culture was aggregated. Sequential sampling plans were developed for aphids and thrips with type I and type II errors set at 0.1, common Kc = 0.6081 (aphids) and = 0. 9449 (thrips), and safety and management levels of 20% (aphids) and 40% (thrips) of infested plants. The sampling plans resulted in two decision boundaries for each species, as follows: the upper boundary, indicating when management (population control) is recommended: S1 = 4.6546 + 0.2849n (aphids), and S1 = 3.6514 + 0.1435n (thrips); and the lower boundary, indicating when population control is not necessary: S0 = -4.6546 + 0.2849n (aphids) and S0 = - 3.6514 + 0.1435n (thrips). The highest probability of error when making a decision was 3% for aphids and 2% for thrips, respectively. The maximum number of samples required to reach a decision was 63 for aphids and 95 for thrips.
  • Insecticide resistance in populations of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), from the state of Pernambuco, Brazil Pest Management

    Santos, VC; Siqueira, HAA de; Silva, JE da; Farias, MJDC de

    Abstract in English:

    The diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (L.) has a great economic importance in Brassicaceae crops in many parts of the world. Recurrent infestations of this pest in growing areas of Pernambuco state, Brazil, have led farmers to frequently spray their crops with insecticides. However, control failures by several insecticides have been alleged by farmers. The objective of this study was to check whether resistance to insecticides could explain these control failures in P. xylostella. Populations of P. xylostella from Pernambuco were collected between January and April 2009. The resistance ratios of P. xylostella populations were compared among five different active ingredients: abamectin, methomyl, lufenuron, indoxacarb, and diafenthiuron by leaf dipping bioassays using foliar discs of kale leaves. Mortality data were submitted to probit analysis. The P. xylostella populations showed variable response and significant resistance to one or more insecticides. The population from Bezerros County exhibited the highest resistance ratios to indoxacarb (25.3 times), abamectin (61.7 times), and lufenuron (705.2 times), when compared to the reference population. The populations from Bonito and Jupi Counties were 33.0 and 12.0 times more resistant to lufenuron and abamectin, respectively, when compared with the reference population. Resistance to methomyl was the least common, but not less important, in at least four populations. These results indicated that control failures were associated with resistance by some of the evaluated insecticides, reinforcing the need for resistance management in areas of the state of Pernambuco.
  • The effect of fragmentation on phlebotomine communities (Diptera: Psychodidae) in areas of ombrophilous forest in São Luís, state of Maranhão, Brazil Public Health

    Azevedo, PCB; Lopes, GN; Fonteles, RS; Vasconcelos, GC; Moraes, JLP; Rebêlo, JMM

    Abstract in English:

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an edge effect could be observed in the structure and composition of phlebotomine assemblages in five forest fragments on São Luís Island. The study also investigated whether there were any differences in species along the forest edge-to-interior gradient and in species richness and abundance between the fragments studied. To capture the insects a transect was defined in each fragment, and eight light traps were set up at 15 m intervals from the edge. Phlebotomines were found in all fragments, and a total of 2972 specimens (1188 males and 1784 females) belonging to 24 species were collected. Of these, the most abundant was Lutzomyia antunesi (Coutinho), followed by Brumptomyia avellari (Costa Lima), L. infraspinosa (Mangabeira), L. flaviscutellata (Mangabeira), L. claustrei Abonnenc, Léger & Fauran, L. wellcomei (Fraiha, Shaw & Lainson), L. sordellii (Shannon & Del Ponte) and L. paraensis (Costa Lima). No significant differences were observed in the number of individuals or species along the edge-to-interior gradient. However, a higher distribution of some species in certain regions of the forest could be observed graphically. There was no correlation between fragment size and the number of species or individuals.
  • Does native bromeliads represent important breeding sites for Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) in urbanized areas? Public Health

    Santos, CB; Leite, GR; Falqueto, A

    Abstract in English:

    This study evaluates the importance of native bromeliads growing on rocky outcrops interspersed with urbanized areas as breeding sites for the Aedes aegypti (L.) in Vitória, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil. Oviposition traps were installed in backyards of houses in two separate zones. In the first zone houses were up to 50 m away from the rocky outcrops, while in the second zone they were at least at 200 m from the rocky outcrops. Aedes aegypti was significantly more abundant in the latter zone. The finding was that rocky outcrops with native bromeliads, even with the greater availability of potential breeding sites, do not play an important role as breeding sites for A. aegypti. This conclusion supports the hypothesis that the macrobiota of native bromeliads plays an important role in the natural control of A. aegypti. Besides, the interspecific competition between species of mosquitoes and the attractiveness of bromeliads could also be important factors.
  • New records, threatens and conservation status for Dichotomius schiffleri Vaz-de-Mello, Louzada & Gavino (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae): an endangered dung beetle species from Brazilian atlantic forest ecosystems Scientific Note

    Vieira, L; Louzada, J; Vaz-de-Mello, FZ; Lopes, PP; Silva, FAB

    Abstract in English:

    Dichotomius schiffleri Vaz-de-Mello et al is often cited as endemic to the preserved coastal sandy-dune vegetation (restinga) of Guriri Island, Espírito Santo state, and is included in the Brazilian List of Endangered Fauna as "critically endangered" (CR). However, we recorded its occurrence in twelve additional sites along the coasts of Espírito Santo, Bahia, Sergipe and Pernambuco. The geographic distribution of D. schiffleri is limited to the coastal Atlantic Forest domain, mainly in preserved restinga patches. We recommend that D. schiffleri remains in the List of Endangered species, but in the "endangered" (EN) category, according to the IUCN criteria.
  • First host record for Anteon pilicorne (Ogloblin) (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae), a parasitoid of Cicadellidae, including the corn leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) Scientific Note

    Virla, EG; Espinosa, MS; Moya-Raygoza, G

    Abstract in English:

    For the first time the dryinid wasp Anteon pilicorne (Ogloblin) is recorded as a parasitoid of two Macrostelini leafhoppers: Balclutha rosea (Scott) and the corn leafhopper Dalbulus maidis (DeLong & Wolcott). New distributional records are presented.
  • Occurrence of Scaptocoris castanea Perty (Hemiptera: Cydnidae) damaging Azadirachta indica (Meliaceae) seedlings in Brazil Scientific Note

    Matias, FI; Sampaio, MV; Coelho, L; Grazia, J

    Abstract in English:

    Neem (Azadirachta indica) seedlings were found infested by the brown burrower bug, Scaptocoris castanea Perty, in December 2009, in the county of Tupaciguara, Minas Gerais state. Symptoms observed varied from leaf yellowing and stem drying, reduction in root size and number to plant death. This is the first report of S. castanea attacking neem plants.
  • Record of Diglyphus walker (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) species in Brazil Scientific Note

    Carvalho, AR; Bueno, VHP; Silva, DB; Costa, VA

    Abstract in English:

    Leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are pests of various crops, mainly in greenhouses, and have Diglyphus spp. as important leafminer larval parasitoids. Until recently, only Diglyphus insularis (Gahan) had been reported in Brazil. In here we report the first records of Diglyphus begini (Ashmead), D. intermedius (Girault) and D. isaea (Walker) in Brazil. These parasitoids were found parasitizing leafminer larvae on cultivated and spontaneous plants in some areas of Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
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