A new species of Euprognatha Stimpson, 1871 (Crustacea, Brachyura, Inachoididae) from off coast of northeastern Brazil

William Santana Marcos Tavares About the authors

Abstracts

A new species of Euprognatha Stimpson, 1871 from off coast of Brazil (Canopus Bank, 02º15.3'00"S - 38º16.0'00"W) is described and illustrated, namely Euprognatha limatula n. sp. The new species is compared to its congeners. Lectotypes are designated for E. acuta A. Milne-Edwards, 1880 and E. granulata Faxon, 1893. A key to the species of Euprognatha is provided.

Seamounts; Brazil; Fishery; Euprognatha; Inachoididae; Spider crab


Uma nova espécie do gênero Euprognatha Stimpson, 1871 coligida ao largo da costa brasileira (monte submarino Canopus, 02º15.3'00"S - 38º16.0'00"W) é descrita e ilustrada, nomeadamente Euprognatha limatula n. sp. A nova espécie é comparada às suas congêneres. Lectótipos são designados para E. acuta A. Milne-Edwards, 1880 and E. granulata Faxon, 1893. É fornecida uma chave de identificação para as espécies de Euprognatha.

Montes submarinos; Brasil; Pesca; Euprognatha; Inachoididae; Caranguejo aranha


A new species of Euprognatha Stimpson, 1871 (Crustacea, Brachyura, Inachoididae) from off coast of northeastern Brazil

William SantanaI,II; Marcos TavaresI,III

IMuseu de Zoologia, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 42.494, 04218-970, São Paulo, SP, Brasil

IIE-mail: wsantana@ib.usp.br

IIIE-mail: mdst@usp.br

ABSTRACT

A new species of Euprognatha Stimpson, 1871 from off coast of Brazil (Canopus Bank, 02º15.3'00"S - 38º16.0'00"W) is described and illustrated, namely Euprognatha limatula n. sp. The new species is compared to its congeners. Lectotypes are designated for E. acuta A. Milne-Edwards, 1880 and E. granulata Faxon, 1893. A key to the species of Euprognatha is provided.

Keywords: Seamounts; Brazil; Fishery; Euprognatha; Inachoididae; Spider crab.

RESUMO

Uma nova espécie do gênero Euprognatha Stimpson, 1871 coligida ao largo da costa brasileira (monte submarino Canopus, 02º15.3'00"S - 38º16.0'00"W) é descrita e ilustrada, nomeadamente Euprognatha limatula n. sp. A nova espécie é comparada às suas congêneres. Lectótipos são designados para E. acuta A. Milne-Edwards, 1880 and E. granulata Faxon, 1893. É fornecida uma chave de identificação para as espécies de Euprognatha.

Palavras-chave: Montes submarinos; Brasil; Pesca; Euprognatha; Inachoididae; Caranguejo aranha.

INTRODUCTION

Seamounts are common features to all ocean basins and many are subject to intense commercial fisheries world-wide, which results in serious impact to its fauna (e.g., Koslow & Gowlet-Homes, 1998; de Forges et al., 2000; Clark & O'Driscoll, 2003; Morato et al., 2004; Morato et al., 2006). The seamounts contribution to the ocean's biodiversity is likely to be significant and, indeed, a number of them have been documented to present high levels of endemicity (Stocks, 2004). Although there are thousands of seamounts in the world's oceans, only a few have been adequately sampled and studied. While widely regarded as a threat to seamount benthic communities, the fishing trawling fleet can play a role in helping to understand the seamount fauna. When biological material obtained as side catch during fishing cruises are secured and sent to sorting centers for study, much can be learned about the taxonomic composition and endemicity of seamounts communities. After all, it is well known that the discovery of many rare or new species world-wide has been made possible through the collaboration of the fishing industry. Fishing activities recently conducted in the Canopus Bank, off coast of northeastern Brazil, have yielded many interesting crustacean and mollusk specimens (Costa & Simone, 2006; Melo-Filho & Melo, 2006; Simone, 2005; 2006; Simone & Abatte, 2005). Among the material sent to the Zoological Museum in São Paulo for study is a new species of spider crab of the genus Euprognatha Stimpson, 1871. The new species is described herein and compared with its congeners. Abbreviations are as follows: cl, carapace length, rostrum included; cw, carapace width; P2-P5, second to fifth pereiopods, P1 is the cheliped. The material herein studied has been deposited in or belongs to the collections of the Museu de Zoologia, Universidade de São Paulo (MZUSP); National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. (USNM); and Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard (MCZ).

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Inachoididae Dana, 1851

Euprognatha Stimpson, 1871

Type species: Euprognatha rastellifera Stimpson, 1871, by monotypy.

Included species: Euprognatha includes five recent species: Euprognatha bifida Rathbun, 1893; E. gracilipes A. Milne-Edwards, 1878; E. granulata Faxon, 1893; E. rastellifera Stimpson, 1871; E. limatula n. sp.; and one fossil species from the Pliocene of southeastern Virginia (Blow, 2003): E. ricei Blow, 2003. Additionally, the fossil record of Euprognatha includes two left dactili of chelae of Euprognatha sp. from the Miocene of Florida (Rathbun, 1935: 112, pl. 24, figs. 16-19).

Euprognatha limatula n. sp.

(Figures 1 A-E; 2 A, E; 3 D; 6 B)






















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    Type material: Brazil, Ceará, Canopus Bank, 02º15.3'00"S - 38º16.0'00"W, Fishing Vessel "Piauí VIII", J. Coltro coll., viii.2005, rocky bottom, 252-260 m: male holotype cl 8.5, cw 7.0 mm (MZUSP 16940).

    Comparative material

    Euprognatha bifida - United States, Baja California, Gulf of California, San Jose Island, "Albatross", station 3001, gray sand and broken shells, 24º55'15"N - 110º39'00"W, 16.iii.1889, M. J. Rathbun det., 60 m: male holotype cl 8.7, cw 7.2 mm (USNM 17335).

    Euprognatha gracilipes - United States, Virgin Islands, St. Croix, Frederikstadt, "Blake", station 132, 17º37'55"N - 64º54'20"W, A. Agassiz coll., 5.i.1879, 214 m: 1 male and 2 females (MCZ 8165). Virgin Islands, St. Croix, Frederikstadt, "Blake", station 132, 17º37'55"N - 64º54'20"W, A. Agassiz coll., 5.i.1879, A. Milne-Edwards det., 214 m: 1 male (MCZ 2647). Virgin Islands, St. Croix, Frederikstadt, "Blake", station 132, 17º37'55"N - 64º54'20"W, A. Agassiz coll., 5.i.1879, M. J. Rathbun det., 214 m: 2 ovigerous females (MCZ 2651). Dominica, "Blake", station 177, 15º32'18"N - 61º30'10"W, A. Agassiz coll., 24.i.1879, A. Milne-Edwards det., 216 m: 1 ovigerous female (MCZ 9165). Barbados, "Blake", station 290, 13º11'54"N - 59º38'45"W, A. Agassiz coll., 9.iii.1879, M. J. Rathbun det., 134 m: 3 ovigerous females (MCZ 2584). "Blake", station 278, 13º04'50"N - 59º37'40"W, A. Agassiz coll., 6.iii.1879, A. Milne-Edwards det., 126 m: 1 ovigerous female (MCZ 2699). "Blake", station 272, 13º04'12"N - 59º36'45"W, A. Agassiz coll., 05.iii.1879, A. Milne-Edwards det., 139 m: 1 male (MCZ 2725). "Blake", station 272, 13º04'12"N - 59º36'45"W, A. Agassiz coll., 5.iii.1879, M. J. Rathbun det., 139 m: 1 male (MCZ 2753). According to the records of the MCZ the type material of E. gracilipes is lost.

    Euprognatha granulata - Costa Rica, Cocos Island, "Albatross", station 3369, 05º32'45"N - 86º55'20"W, 28.ii.1891, Faxon det., 95 m: ovigerous female lectotype cl 7.7, cw 6.0 mm and 1 ovigerous female paralectotype (MCZ 4477).

    Euprognatha rastellifera - United States, Marthas Vineyard, "Fish Hawk", station 874, soft mud, 40º00'00"N - 70º57'00"W, 13.ix.1880, M. J. Rathbun det., 155 m: male holotype cl 19.3, cw 11.7 mm of Euprognatha rastellifera marthae Rathbun, 1925 (USNM 18749). Cuba, Havana, "Albatross", station 2342, coral, 23º10'39"N - 82º20'21"W, 19.i.1885, M. J. Rathbun det., 37 m: male holotype cl 9.9, cw 7.4 mm, 3 males paratypes, and 1 ovigerous female paratype of Euprognatha rastellifera spinosa Rathbun, 1894 (USNM 18108). Saint Kitts, "Blake", station 148, 17º17'12"N - 62º46'43"W, A. Agassiz coll., 14.i.1879, 381 m: 1 male paralectotype of Euprognatha acuta A. Milne-Edwards, 1880 (MCZ 2728). Martinica, IFREMER-IGMAR 3, station 431, sample 290, 14º23.01'N - 60º53.47'W, 18.ix.1994, dredge: 1 male (MZUSP 17346). Saint Vincent, "Blake", station 269, 13º07'55"N - 61º05'36"W, A. Agassiz coll., 3.iii.1879, 227 m: male lectotype cl 6.6, cw 5.3 mm and 1 male paralectotype of Euprognatha acuta A. Milne-Edwards, 1880 (MCZ 2580). Barbados, "Blake", station 296, 13º05'24"N - 59º38'45"W, A. Agassiz coll., 10.iii.1879, 154-156 m: 1 female paralectotype of Euprognatha acuta A. Milne-Edwards, 1880 (MCZ 2600). Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, Bacia de Campos, Petrobras station 50, G.A.S. Melo det.: 1 male (MZUSP 11934). Rio de Janeiro, Ilha Grande, station C, 30.vii.1966, G.A.S. Melo det.: 2 males (MZUSP 3399). Rio de Janeiro, Ilha Grande, station D, 07.ii.1969, G.A.S. Melo det., 200 m: 6 males (MZUSP 3403). Rio de Janeiro, Ilha Grande, station 135, 04.vii.1966, G.A.S. Melo det., 13 m: 1 male (MZUSP 2778). Rio de Janeiro, Ilha Grande, station 136, 04.vii.1966, G.A.S. Melo det.: 1 male (MZUSP 2779). Rio de Janeiro, Projeto Ilha Grande, station 172, 08.vii.1966, G.A.S. Melo det., 15.5 m: 2 males (MZUSP 2780). Rio de Janeiro, Projeto Ilha Grande, station 290, 30.vii.1966, G.A.S. Melo det., 31 m: 1 female (MZUSP 9375). São Paulo, 23º33'S - 42º17'W, G.A.S. Melo det.: 1 male (MZUSP 3478). São Paulo, Projeto Integrado, station 4853, 24º01'S - 44º33'W, 16.xii.1985, fine sand, 104 m: 3 males and 1 female (MZUSP 10822). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6361, 09.i.1997, F. Mantelatto det.: 2 males and 3 females (MZUSP 13758). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6661, 24º17.678'S - 43º52.198'W, 09.i.1998, F. Mantelatto det., dredge, 150 m: 30 males and 27 females (MZUSP 13792). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6661, 24º17.678'S -43º52.198'W, 09.i.1998, G.A.S. Melo, P.A. Coelho, O. Campos det., dredge, 150 m: 13 males and 5 females (MZUSP 13402). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6661, 24º17.678'S - 43º52.198'W, 09.i.1998, G.A.S. Melo, P.A. Coelho, O. Campos det., dredge, 150 m: 1 male (MZUSP 13400). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6661, 24º17.678'S - 43º52.198'W, 04.i.1998, G.A.S. Melo, P.A. Coelho, O. Campos det., dredge, 150 m: 1 male and 1 female (MZUSP 13409). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6664, 10.i.1998, G.A.S. Melo, P.A. Coelho, O. Campos det.: 1 male (MZUSP 13406). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6666, 24º17.129'S - 44º12.149'W, 10.i.1998, F. Mantelatto det., 163 m: 1 male and 1 female (MZUSP 13779). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6673, 24º17.939'S - 44º35.983'W, 11.i.1998, dredge, 133 m: 2 males (MZUSP 13746). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6673, 24º17.939'S - 44º35.983'W, 11.i.1998, F. Mantelatto det., dredge, 133 m: 1 male (MZUSP 13781). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6665, sample box C, 24º20.844'S - 44º09.913'W, 10.i.1998, Campos Jr. det., 258 m: 1 male (MZUSP 17575). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6665, 24º20.844'S - 44º09.913'W, 10.i.1998, G.A.S. Melo, P.A. Coelho, O. Campos det., 258 m: 9 males and 14 females (MZUSP 13403). Revizee Score Sul, station 6665 bt6, 24º20.844'S - 44º09.913'W, 10.i.1998, F. Mantelatto det., 258 m: 58 males, 85 females and 4 juveniles (MZUSP 13782). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6672 btp, 24º27.751'S - 44º30.351'W, 11.i.1998, F. Mantelatto det., 166 m: 1 male (MZUSP 13789). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6674, 24º31.080'S - 44º54.000'W, 11.i.1998, G.A.S. Melo, P.A. Coelho, O. Campos det., 122 m: 2 males (MZUSP 13397). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6681, 25º11.000'S - 44º56.650'W, 12.i.1998, F. Mantelatto det., dredge, 167 m: 2 juveniles (MZUSP 13773). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6681, 25º11.000'S -44º56.650'W, 12.i.1998, F. Mantelatto det., dredge, 167 m: 2 males and 2 juveniles (MZUSP 13749). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6681, sample box C, 25º11.000'S - 44º56.650'W, Campos Jr. det., 12.i.1998, dredge, 167 m: 1 male (MZUSP 17576). Revizee Score - Sul, station 6681 bt6, 25º11.000'S - 44º56.650'W, 12.i.1998, F. Mantelatto det., dredge, 167 m: 1 juvenile (MZUSP 13775). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6686, 25º37.021'S - 45º13.586'W, 13.i.1998, G.A.S. Melo, P.A. Coelho, O. Campos det., dredge, 153 m: 1 female (MZUSP 13389). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6686, 25º37.021'S - 45º13.586'W, 13.i.1998, dredge: 1 male (MZUSP 13404). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6686, 25º37.021'S - 45º13.586'W, 13.i.1998, F. Mantelatto det., dredge, 153 m: 4 males and 2 females (MZUSP 13752). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6686, 25º37.021'S - 45º13.586'W, 13.i.1998, G.A.S. Melo, P.A. Coelho, O. Campos det., dredge, 153 m: 2 males and 2 females (MZUSP 13395). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6686, 25º37.021'S - 45º13.586'W, 09.i.1998, G.A.S. Melo, P.A. Coelho, O. Campos det., dredge, 153 m: 1 male (MZUSP 13414). Revizee - Score Sul, station 6686, 25º37.021'S - 45º13.586'W, 13.i.1998, F. Mantelatto det., dredge, 153 m: 4 males (MZUSP 13753). Rio Grande do Sul, GEDIP, station 1856, 30º42'S - 49º03'W, 06.viii.1972, G.A.S. Melo det., 192 m: 1 male (MZUSP 6120). Rio Grande do Sul, GEDIP, station 1646, 34º25'S - 51º49'W, 17.i.1972, G.A.S. Melo det., 166 m: 1 male (MZUSP 6159). Rio Grande do Sul, GEDIP, station 465, 34º38'S - 51º36'W, 11.xii.1968, G.A.S. Melo det.: 1 male (MZUSP 3439). Rio Grande do Sul, "Prof. W. Besnard", GEDIP, station 1066, 22.i.1972, G.A.S. Melo det.: 1 male (MZUSP 6075). Rio Grande do Sul, GEDIP, station 1883, G.A.S. Melo det.: 1 female (MZUSP 9205). Costa Sul 02, DG 10, 27.iii.1972, P.A. Coelho det.: 1 male and 1 female (MZUSP 6581).

    Description: Carapace pyriform, little longer than wide; regions well demarcated, strongly inflated. Carapace covered with minute granules, sub-equals in size, mostly concentrated on flanks; hooked setae sparsely distributed, more dense near base of rostrum, between orbits and in hepatic, gastric, and branchial regions. Carapace with 8 strong spines arranged as follows: 1 metagastric; 1 cardiac; 2 protobranquial, one of each side; 4 mesobranquial, two of each side. Antero-lateral margin of mesobranquial region with small spines and tubercles. Thoracic pleurites 5-8 gimnopleura, consisting of narrow plates densely ornamented with minute, uniformly distributed granules; coxal margin of pleurites spinulous.

    Rostrum short, bifurcated, ending in two strong, smooth, acute, directed upward, spines. Supraorbital spines long; orbital margin granulated dorsally. Post-orbital spine smooth, markedly long, curved forward, slightly longer than ocular peduncle. Ocular peduncle constricted medially, armed with blunt tubercle distally.

    Antennular fossae longitudinally ovate; anterior margins crenulated. Interantennular septum elongated, strongly compressed laterally, forming distinct lobe ventrally directed.

    Antennal flagella long; third and fourth antennal articles long, slender, exceeding rostrum. First and second antennal articles fused to epistome; second article with long spine in anterolateral angle, slightly directed upward; ventro-lateral margin of second article with row of sub-equal tubercles.

    Epistome slightly wider than long. Epistomial spine and interantennular septa separated by small gap. Mouthfield trapezoidal, strongly produced anteriorly. Pterygostomian region subtriangular, with small tubercles, separated from subhepatic region by shallow groove. Subhepatic region with strong tubercle.

    Third maxillipeds completely covering buccal frame. Exopod long, nearly reaching distal margin of merus; dorsal face with small, uniformly distributed tubercles. Ischia longer than broad; mesial margins slightly curved, leaving distinct gap; crista dentata with row of short setae and small teeth; dorsal face of ischium concave longitudinally, with small, well-spaced tubercles. Merus faintly longer than half of ischium, ornamented with small, well-spaced tubercles; anterolateral margin strongly expanded. Palp cylindrical, longer than merus; propodus and dactyl unarmed; carpus ornamented with spinules dorsally.

    Sternite IV strongly sloping down in ventral view, densely covered with rounded granules. Sternite III broadly triangular, with sparse granules. Sternites V-VIII densely paved with rounded granules.

    Chelipeds equals, subcylindrical, distinctly long. Dactyl and fixed finger distinctly shorter than palm, cutting edges consisting of sub-equal calcareous teeth; when closed fingers leaving gap in proximal half; dactyl with small, blunt, distinct basal tooth. Movable and fixed fingers smooth on mesial and lateral faces, inconspicuous carina on lateral face of dactyl. Propodus slender, weakly inflated, with minute, almost imperceptible granules. Carpus with minute granules on mesial and lateral surfaces, almost smooth dorsally. Merus with minute granules. Ischium coarsely granulated. Pereiopods slender, cylindrical. First ambulatory leg longer, remaining legs decreasing in length posteriorly. Dactyl slightly curved, densely setose, small tubercles on lower edge. Carpus with sparse, minute granules on upper and lower surfaces. Merus with dorsal, strong, backward curved spines; smaller spines on lateral and ventral faces; mesial face of pereopods smooth. Ischium with spinules on lateral surface.

    First abdominal segment densely covered with granules, bearing strong spine densely granulated proximally, otherwise smooth; segments 2 and 3 densely tuberculated, remaining segments paved with small, rounded granules medially concentrated. Abdominal segments 1-5 free, slightly raised medially forming low longitudinal ridge. Segment 6 fused to telson. Pleotelson subtriangular, terminating in rounded apex.

    Type locality: Brazil, Ceará, Canopus Bank, 02º15.3'00"S - 38º16.0'00"W, between 252 and 260 meters depth.

    Distribution: Known so far only from the type locality.

    Etymology: From the Latin limatula (diminutive feminine), polish, scrape, in allusion to the aspect of the chelipeds.

    Remarks: Euprognatha limatula n. sp. differs from all its congeners by the (i) presence of distinct, subequal protobranchial and anterior mesobranchial spines (versus protobranchial and anterior mesobranchial spines absent, figs. 3-6); (ii) dactyl, propodus, and merus of the cheliped minutely granulated, granules almost imperceptible (versus coarsely granulated, fig. 1A); (iii) dactyl of P4 only slightly longer than half of the maximal length of propodus (versus much longer than half of the propodus, almost reaching proximal end of carpus, figs. 2B-E); (iv) gastric and cardiac regions of the carapace almost smooth, carapace finely granulated on the flanks (versus carapace coarsely granulated or strongly tuberculated all over, figs. 3-6). Additionally, Euprognatha limatula n. sp. is promptly distinguished from E. gracilipes by its second antennal spine much longer than rostrum in dorsal view (versus shorter than rostrum in dorsal view, figs. 3B, D); from E. ricei and E. bifida by the absence of intestinal spine (versus one or two strong intestinal spines, respectively, figs. 3A, D); and from E. granulata by the meri of P2-P4 armed with sparse, strong, backward curved spines (versus densely distributed, short, straight spines, figs. 1B and 2A). Euprognatha limatula n. sp. is further differentiated from E. bifida, E. ricei, and E. gracilipes by its strong interantenular spine (versus interantenular spine absent, fig. 1E).


     




    Euprognatha rastellifera Stimpson, 1860

    In E. rastellifera the ornamentation of the carapace is strongly variable, giving rise to the recognition of several new species or subspecies (figs. 4A-D and 6C-D): E. acuta A. Milne-Edwards, 1880 (figs. 4A and 6D) (type-localities: Saint Kitts, Saint Vincent, and Barbados); E. inermis A. Milne-Edwards, 1878 (type-locality: Guadeloupe); E. rastellifera marthae Rathbun, 1925 (figs. 4B and 6C) (type-locality: Southwest off Marthas Vineyard); E. rastellifera rastellifera Stimpson, 1871 (fig. 4D) (type-locality: Florida Keys); and E. rastellifera spinosa Rathbun, 1894 (fig. 4C) (type-locality: off Havana). Rathbun (1925: 97) noticed that "None of these forms is entirely restricted to its own range, they overlap one another, and two forms may occur in the same haul". Indeed, when long series of individuals from different areas are examined, there is no longer clear cut distinction between them. Therefore we recognize only one species, E. rastellifera Stimpson, 1871 (see also Nizinski, 2003: 129; Mclaughlin et al., 2005: 311). E. rastellifera is widely distributed in the Western Atlantic, ranging from off Georges Bank to Uruguay, including Antilles (Williams, 1984: 298; Melo, 1996: 204 as E. acuta; Nizinski, 2003: 129; Campos et al., 2005: 210). The type of E. rastellifera Stimpson, 1871 is not extant (Rathbun, 1925: 96).

    Lectotypes designations

    Euprognatha acuta A. Milne-Edwards, 1880: The specimens upon which A. Milne-Edwards (1880) based the description of E. acuta were obtained by the steamer "Blake" (Peirce & Patterson, 1879) in Saint Kitts, Grenadines, Saint Vincent, and Barbados. A. Milne-Edwards (1880: 7) did not mention how many individuals were available to him. The "Blake" collections were kept in the MCZ, where three males and one female syntypes of E. acuta are well preserved. They are as follows: one male from Saint Kitts, two males from Saint Vincent, and one female from Barbados (for details see above under comparative material). There is no material of E. acuta from the Grenadines in the MCZ. When available A. Milne-Edwards used to retain a few specimens in the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, in Paris. It is then well possible that the material from the Grenadines be housed there. In order to ensure that the name Euprognatha acuta A. Milne Edwards, 1880, be properly and consistently applied, the male MCZ 2580, cl 6.6, cw 5.3 mm, from Saint Vincent, "Blake", station 269, 13º07'55"N - 61º05'36"W, A. Agassiz coll., 3.iii.1879, 227 m, is selected herein as the lectotype. The second male from Saint Vincent, the male from Saint Kitts (MCZ 2728), and the female from Barbados (MCZ 2600) are the paralectotypes.

    Euprognatha granulata Faxon, 1893: Faxon (1893:149) based the description of E. granulata upon two ovigerous females from Cocos Island, Costa Rica (for details see above under comparative material). Because no holotype was designated and in order to ensure that the name Euprognatha granulata Faxon, 1893, be properly and consistently applied, the female syntype MCZ 4477, cl 7.7, cw 6.0 mm, is selected herein as the lectotype. The second female is the paralectotype.

    Key to the species of Euprognatha

    1. Two strong intestinal spines................................................ Euprognatha bifida One strong intestinal spine or intestinal spine lacking...................................... 2 2. One strong intestinal spine................................................... Euprognatha ricei

    Intestinal spine lacking..............................................................................3

    3.

    Protobranchial and anterior mesobranchial spines present................................... ......................................................................... Euprognatha limatula n. sp.

    Protobranchial and anterior mesobranchial spines absent................................. 4

    4.

    Second antennal article with strong subdistal, sharp spine in ventral view............. ............................................................................. Euprognatha rastellifera

    Second antennal article smooth subdistally or at most with a blunt subdistal tubercle in ventral view............................................................................. 5

    5. Second antennal spine much longer than rostrum in dorsal view.......................... ............................................................................... Euprognatha granulata

    Second antennal spine shorter than rostrum in dorsal view................................. ............................................................................... Euprognatha gracilipes

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    We are sincerely grateful to José Coltro for entrusting the present material for study and to Rafael Lemaitre for critically reviewing the manuscript; to Adam Baldinger (MCZ) and Rafael Lemaitre (USNM) for making the material from their institutions available for study and for providing working space. Rose Gulledge, Karen Reed (both from the USNM) and Ardis Johnston and Laura Leibensperger (both from the MCZ) were very instrumental in helping us to locate specimens and literature. WS thanks CAPES, Brasilia, for continued financial support through fellowship number 33002010027P5; and the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard, for financial support through the Ernst Mayr Travel Grant in Animal Systematics. MT thanks CNPq, Brasilia, for supporting studies on the systematics of decapod crustaceans in the form of ongoing grants 302065/2007-5 and 471293/2006-7; and the Pró-Reitoria de Pesquisa of the University of São Paulo for financial support (Projeto I 2007).

    Recebido em: 22.08.2008

    Aceito em: 18.09.2008

    Impresso em: 30.09.2008

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    Publication Dates

    • Publication in this collection
      13 Oct 2008
    • Date of issue
      2008

    History

    • Received
      22 Aug 2008
    • Accepted
      18 Sept 2008
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