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Brazilian Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery, Volume: 39, Issue: 1, Published: 2024
  • Five-Year Follow-Up After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis and Concomitant Coronary Artery Disease: A Single-Center Experience Original Article

    Abawi, Akram; Magnuson, Anders; Fröbert, Ole; Samano, Ninos

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Introduction: There is no consensus on the impact of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Therefore, the objective of this study was, in a single-center setting, to evaluate the five-year outcome of transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients with or without coronary artery disease. Methods: All transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients between 2009 and 2019 were included and grouped according to the presence or absence of coronary artery disease. The primary endpoint, five-year all-cause mortality, was evaluated using Cox regression adjusted for age, sex, procedure years, and comorbidities. Comorbidities interacting with coronary artery disease were evaluated with interaction tests. In-hospital complications was the secondary endpoint. Results: In total, 176 patients had aortic stenosis and concomitant coronary artery disease, while 170 patients had aortic stenosis only. Mean follow-up was 2.2±1.6 years. There was no difference in the adjusted five-year all-cause mortality between transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients with and without coronary artery disease (hazard ratio 1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.59-1.70, P=0.99). In coronary artery disease patients, impaired renal function, peripheral arterial disease, or ejection fraction < 50% showed a significant interaction effect with higher five-year all-cause mortality. No significant differences in complications between the groups were found. Conclusion: Five-year mortality did not differ between transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients with or without coronary artery disease. However, in patients with coronary artery disease and impaired renal function, peripheral arterial disease, or ejection fraction < 50%, we found significantly higher five-year all-cause mortality.
  • Prognostic Impact of Residual Moderate Mitral Regurgitation Following Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Original Article

    Stankowski, Tomasz; Aboul-Hassan, Sleiman Sebastian; Salem, Mohammed; Rochor, Kristin; Schenk, Soeren; Erkenov, Temirlan; Zinab, Farzaneh Seifi; Muehle, Anja; Herwig, Volker; Harnath, Axel; Sá, Michel Pompeu; Ramlawi, Basel; Fritzsche, Dirk; Perek, Bartłomiej

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The impact of mitral regurgitation (MR) on valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation (VIV-TAVI) in patients with failed bioprostheses remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic impact of residual moderate MR following VIV-TAVI. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 127 patients who underwent VIV-TAVI between March 2010 and November 2021. At least moderate MR was observed in 51.2% of patients before the procedure, and MR improved in 42.1% of all patients. Patients with postoperative severe MR, previous mitral valve intervention, and patients who died before postoperative echocardiography were excluded from further analyses. The remaining 114 subjects were divided into two groups according to the degree of postprocedural MR: none-mild MR (73.7%) or moderate MR (26.3%). Propensity score matching yielded 23 pairs for final comparison. Results: No significant differences were found between groups before and after matching in early results. In the matched cohort, survival probabilities at one, three, and five years were 95.7% vs. 87.0%, 85.0% vs. 64.5%, and 85.0% vs. 29.0% in the none-mild MR group vs. moderate MR-group, respectively (log-rank P=0.035). Among survivors, patients with moderate MR had worse functional status according to New York Heart Association (NYHA) class at follow-up (P=0.006). Conclusion: MR is common in patients with failed aortic bioprostheses, and improvement in MR-status was observed in over 40% of patients following VIV-TAVI. Residual moderate MR after VIV-TAVI is not associated with worse early outcomes, however, it was associated with increased mortality at five years of follow-up and worse NYHA class among survivors.
  • Endothelial Microparticles: Markers of Inflammatory Response After Sutureless Valve Implantation Original Article

    Oliveira, Jenny Lourdes Rivas de; Santos, Magaly Arrais dos; Timerman, Ari

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is related to increased circulating endothelial microparticles (EMP). Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the plasma concentration of EMP between patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with conventional bioprosthesis implantation and Perceval™ S (LivaNova) and to evaluate its impact on the inflammatory response in the short-term follow-up. Methods: This is a randomized clinical trial with 24 patients submitted to isolated aortic valve replacement divided into two groups: Perceval™ S (Group P) and conventional bioprostheses (Group C). Incidence of severe SIRS (three or more criteria) in the first 48 hours postoperatively, EMP release profile, interleukins (IL) 6 and 8, C-reactive protein, and procalcitonin were analyzed preand postoperatively at 24 hours and three months. Results: There were 24 patients (12 in each group), mean age was 69.92±5.17 years, 83.33% were female, the incidence of severe SIRS was 66.7% and 50% in groups C and P, respectively (P=0.68), and EMP showed a significant increase in the 24-hour postoperative period (P≤0.001) and subsequent decrease in the three-month postoperative period (P≤0.001), returning to baseline levels. For IL-6 and IL-8, there was a greater increase in group C at 24 hours postoperatively (P=.0.02 and P<0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of severe SIRS was similar in both groups, with significantly higher levels of IL-6 and IL-8, at the 24-hour postoperative period, in group C, however with higher levels of EMP in group P, and subsequent return to baseline levels at the three-month postoperative period in both groups.
  • Ascending Aortic Surgery for Small Aneurysms in Men and Women Original Article

    Panfilov, Dmitri; Saushkin, Victor; Sazonova, Svetlana; Kozlov, Boris

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Introduction: According to recent data, thoracic aortic surgery has reduced morbidity and mortality including ascending aortic aneurysm treatment; however, women are at increased postoperative risk of adverse outcomes. Objective: Our aim was to evaluate early and late outcomes in male and female patients who underwent pre-emptive ascending aortic replacement (AAR). Methods: From January 2013 to September 2021, 91 patients (56 [61.5%] men and 35 [38.5%] women) underwent AAR for small (ranged from 5.0 to 5.5 cm) non-syndromic aneurysms. A propensity score-based adjustment of the groups was performed. We compared clinical outcomes between males and females. Results: Preoperative normalized aortic diameters were significantly larger in females (2.9 [2.7; 3.2] cm/m2) than in males (2.5 [2.3; 2.6] cm/m2, P<0.001), without differences in absolute values (51 [49; 53] mm vs. 52 [50; 53] mm, P=0.356). There were no significant differences in neurological, cardiac, pulmonary, and renal complications in both groups before and after matching. In-hospital mortality was 1 (1.8%) and 2 (5.7%) (P=0.307) in male and female patients in unmatched groups and 1 (2.9%) and 2 (5.7%) (P=0.553) in matched groups, respectively. Univariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the only risk factor for in-hospital mortality was age (odds ratio 1.117, 95% confidence interval 1.003-1.244; P=0.04). The overall survival rate was 83.5±0.06% in men and 94.3±0.04% in women at 36 months (P=0.404). Conclusion: Ascending aortic surgery for aneurysms ranged from 5.0 to 5.5 cm seems to have tolerable early and late outcomes in men and women.
  • Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Uses in Refractory Cardiogenic Shock After Open-Heart Surgery Original Article

    Elizalde, Pablo Salazar; Chaud, German J.; Gundelach, Joaquín; Gaete, Barbara; Durand, Marcos; Cuadra, Ignacio; Provoste, Sinthya; Yanten, Enrique; Tiznado, Marcelo; Alvarado, Cristóbal

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is the first-line therapy for temporary mechanical circulatory support allowing cardiac and pulmonary recovery or as a bridge to further therapeutic alternatives. The aim of this study was to report clinical outcomes in adult patients with refractory cardiac failure after open-heart surgery undergoing ECMO in a single center with an ECMO unit in Chile. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed adults with refractory cardiac failure after open-heart surgery who required a venoarterial (VA) ECMO between 2016 and 2021. Results: Of 16 patients with VA ECMO, 60% were men (n=10), 90% had hypertension (n=14), 69% had < 30% of left ventricular ejection fraction (n=11), and the mean European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation II score was 12 ± 11%. ECMO support with central cannulation accounts for 81% (n=13), and an intra-aortic balloon pump was used in nine patients (56%). The mean time of support was 4.7 ± 2.6 days (1.5 - 12 days). ECMO weaning was achieved in 88% of patients, and in-hospital mortality was 44% (n=7) after discharge. The freedom from all-cause mortality at one year of follow-up of the entire cohort was 38% (n=6). Conclusion: VA ECMO is now a well-known life-saving therapeutic option, but mortality and morbidity remain high. Implementation of an ECMO program with educational training is mandatory in order to find the proper balance between patient benefits, ethical considerations, and public health financial input in South America.
  • Acute Aortic Dissection Type A in Younger Patients (< 60 Years Old) - Does Full Arch Replacement Provide Benefits Compared to Limited Approach? Original Article

    Natanov, Ruslan; Shrestha, Malakh Lal; Martens, Andreas; Beckmann, Erik; Krueger, Heike; Arar, Morsi; Rudolph, Linda; Ruemke, Stefan; Poyanmehr, Reza; Korte, Wilhelm; Schilling, Tobias; Haverich, Axel; Kaufeld, Tim

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Acute aortic dissection Stanford type A (AADA) is a surgical emergency associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although surgical management has improved, the optimal therapy is a matter of debate. Different surgical strategies have been proposed for patients under 60 years old. This paper evaluates the postoperative outcome and the need for secondary aortic operation after a limited surgical approach (proximal arch replacement) vs. extended arch repair. Methods: Between January 2000 and January 2018, 530 patients received surgical treatment for AADA at our hospital; 182 were under 60 years old and were enrolled in this study - Group A (n=68), limited arch repair (proximal arch replacement), and group B (n=114), extended arch repair (> proximal arch replacement). Results: More pericardial tamponade (P=0.005) and preoperative mechanical resuscitation (P=0.014) were seen in Group A. More need for renal replacement therapy (P=0.047) was seen in the full arch group. Mechanical ventilation time (P=0.022) and intensive care unit stay (P<0.001) were shorter in the limited repair group. Thirty-day mortality was comparable (P=0.117). New onset of postoperative stroke was comparable (Group A four patients [5.9%] vs. Group B 15 patients [13.2%]; P=0.120). Long-term follow-up did not differ significantly for secondary aortic surgery. Conclusion: Even though young patients received only limited arch repair, the outcome was comparable. Full-arch replacement was not beneficial in the long-time follow-up. A limited approach is justified in the cohort of young AADA patients. Exemptions, like known Marfan syndrome and the presence of an intimal tear in the arch, should be considered.
  • Performance Evaluation of Geometrically Different Pediatric Arterial Cannulae in a Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Bypass Model Original Article

    Carvalho, Gabriela B. de O.; Caneo, Luiz Fernando; Matte, Gregory; Cruz, Caio Henrique de A.; Silva, Everton Neri da; Carletto, Luciana P.; Castro, Ana Vitória C. X. de; Silva, Betina G. Madueño; Policarpo, Valéria C.; Cestari, Idágene A.; Jatene, Fabio B; Jatene, Marcelo Biscegli

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Objective: To define a reference chart comparing pressure drop vs. flow generated by a set of arterial cannulae currently utilized in cardiopulmonary bypass conditions in pediatric surgery. Methods: Cannulae from two manufacturers were selected considering their design and outer and inner diameters. Cannula performance was evaluated in terms of pressure drop vs. flow during simulated cardiopulmonary bypass conditions. The experimental circuits consisted of a Jostra HL-20 roller pump, a Quadrox-i pediatric oxygenator (Maquet Cardiopulmonary AG, Rastatt, Germany), and a custom pediatric tubing set. The circuit was primed with lactated Ringer’s solution only (first condition) and with human packed red blood cells added (second condition) to achieve a hematocrit of 30%. Cannula sizes 8 to 16 Fr were inserted into the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit with a “Y” connector. The flow was adjusted in 100 ml/min increments within typical flow ranges for each cannula. Pre-cannula and post-cannula pressures were measured to calculate the pressure drop. Results: Utilizing a pressure drop limit of 100 mmHg, our results suggest a recommended flow limit of 500, 900, 1400, 2600, and 3100 mL/min for Braile arterial cannulae sizes 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 Fr, respectively. For Medtronic DLP arterial cannulae sizes 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 Fr, the recommended flow limit is 600, 1100, 1700, 2700, and 3300 mL/min, respectively. Conclusion: This study reinforces discrepancies in pressure drop between cannulae of the same diameter supplied by different manufacturers and the importance of independent translational research to evaluate components’ performance.
  • Del Nido vs. Cold Blood Cardioplegia for High-Risk Isolated Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients with Reduced Ventricular Function Original Article

    Sanetra, Krzysztof; Gerber, Witold; Mazur, Marta; Kubaszewska, Marta; Pietrzyk, Ewa; Buszman, Piotr Paweł; Kaźmierczak, Paweł; Bochenek, Andrzej

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The evidence for using del Nido cardioplegia protocol in high-risk patients with reduced ejection fraction undergoing isolated coronary surgery is insufficient. Methods: The institutional database was searched for isolated coronary bypass procedures. Patients with ejection fraction < 40% were selected. Propensity matching (age, sex, infarction, number of grafts) was used to pair del Nido (Group 1) and cold blood (Group 2) cardioplegia patients. Investigation of biomarker release, changes in ejection fraction, mortality, stroke, perioperative myocardial infarction, composite endpoint (major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events), and other perioperative parameters was performed. Results: Matching allowed the selection of 45 patient pairs. No differences were noted at baseline. After cross-clamp release, spontaneous sinus rhythm return was observed more frequently in Group 1 (80% vs. 48.9%; P=0.003). Troponin values were similar in both groups 12 and 36 hours after surgery, as well as creatine kinase at 12 hours. A trend favored Group 1 in creatine kinase release at 36 hours (median 4.9; interquartile range 3.8-9.6 ng/mL vs. 7.3; 4.5-17.5 ng/mL; P=0.085). Perioperative mortality, rates of myocardial infarction, stroke, or major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events were similar. No difference in postoperative ejection fraction was noted (median 35.0%; interquartile range 32.0-38.0% vs. 35.0%; 32.0-40.0%; P=0.381). There was a trend for lower atrial fibrillation rate in Group 1 (6.7% vs. 17.8%; P=0.051). Conclusion: The findings indicate that del Nido cardioplegia provides satisfactory protection in patients with reduced ejection fraction undergoing coronary bypass surgery. Further prospective trials are required.
  • Our 10-Year Experience with Atrial Myxomas: Is Concurrent Valve Intervention Really Warranted? Original Article

    Potey, Ketika; Jhajhria, Narender; Mallik, Manish; Bhushan, Rahul; Aiyer, Palash; Grover, Vijay

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Primary cardiac myxomas are rare tumors. Concurrent valvular lesion is a common finding on evaluation which is thought to be due to annular dilatation secondary to tumor movement across the valve, functional obstruction across the valve, and severe pulmonary hypertension secondary to chronic obstruction. A common belief among surgeons is that excision of myxoma leads to abatement of symptoms, and further valve intervention may not be warranted. Methods: A 10-year retrospective descriptive study was designed to analyze patients who underwent excision of cardiac myxoma at our center. Data was analyzed regarding presenting features, echocardiographic findings of myxoma and valve morphology, intraoperative assessment, and postoperative outcome with/without valve repair/replacement in all patients. Results: A total of 22 patients underwent surgery for myxoma. Six patients underwent successful mitral valve repair with ring annuloplasty, two had moderate mitral regurgitation, three had severe mitral regurgitation, and one patient had no mitral regurgitation on preoperative assessment, but moderate mitral regurgitation was found intraoperatively. Four of these patients had no residual mitral regurgitation in follow-up period while two had mild residual mitral regurgitation. One patient had severe mitral stenosis of concurrent rheumatic etiology and successfully underwent mitral valve replacement. Conclusion: Cardiac myxomas are rare benign tumors commonly associated with mitral valve insufficiency. Mitral valve should be assessed intraoperatively after excision of mass as preoperative assessment might often be insufficient. Concomitant mitral valve intervention might be needed with a case-specific tailored approach, and mitral valve repair with ring annuloplasty offers best surgical outcome in such cases.
  • Comparison of Early and Mid-Term Outcomes After Classic and Modified Morrow Septal Myectomy in Patients with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy Original Article

    Karaarslan, Mustafa; Beyazal, Osman Fehmi; Yanartaş, Mehmed

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The aim of our study is to compare the early and mid-term outcomes of patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy who underwent classic and modified Morrow septal myectomy. Methods: Between 2014 and 2019, 48 patients (24 males; mean age 49.27±16.41 years) who underwent septal myectomy were evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups - those who underwent classic septal myectomy (n=28) and those who underwent modified septal myectomy (n=20). Results: Mitral valve intervention was higher in the classic Morrow group than in the modified Morrow group, but there was no significant difference (P=0.42). Mortality was found to be lower in the modified Morrow group than in the classic Morrow group (P=0.01). In both groups, the mean immediate postoperative gradient was significantly higher than the mean of the 3rd and 12th postoperative months. The preoperative and postoperative gradient difference of the modified Morrow group was significantly higher than of the classic Morrow group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Classic Morrow and modified Morrow procedures are effective methods for reducing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. The modified Morrow procedure was found to be superior to the classic Morrow procedure in terms of reducing the incidence of mitral valve intervention with the reduction of the left ventricular outflow tract gradient.
  • Role of Computed Tomography Angiography in the Short-Term Follow-up of Aortic Coarctation Repair Original Article

    Cardoso, Mariana Ribeiro Rodero; Crestani, Ariela Maltarolo; Souza, Antônio Soares; Braga, Fernanda Del Campo Braojos; Brun, Marília Maroneze; Murakami, Alexandre Noboru; Cajueiro, Francisco Candido Monteiro; Marchi, Carlos Henrique De; Croti, Ulisses Alexandre

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is a narrowing of the thoracic aorta that often manifests as discrete stenosis but may be tortuous or in long segment. The study aimed to evaluate pre and post-surgical aspects of pediatric patients submitted to CoA surgical correction and to identify possible predisposing factors for aortic recoarctation. Methods: Twenty-five patients were divided into groups according to presence (N=8) or absence (N=17) of recoarctation after surgical correction of CoA and evaluated according to clinical-demographic profile, vascular characteristics via computed angiotomography (CAT), and other pathological conditions. Results: Majority of males (64%), ≥ 15 days old (76%), ≥ 2.5 kg (80%). There was similarity between groups with and without recoarctation regarding sex (male: 87% vs. 53%; P=0.277), age (≥ 15 days: 62.5 vs. 82%; P=0.505), and weight (≥ 2.5 kg: 87.5 vs. 76.5; P=0,492). Altered values of aortic root/Valsalva diameter, proximal transverse arch, and distal isthmus, and normal values for aorta prevailed in preoperative CAT. Normal values for the aortic root/Valsalva sinus diameter were observed with and without recoarctation, the same for both groups regarding ascending and descending aorta in postoperative CAT. No significant difference for altered values of proximal transverse arch and alteration in distal isthmus was observed. Conclusion: No predictive risk for recoarctation was observed. CTA proved to be important in CoA diagnosis and management, since CoA is mainly related with altered diameter of aortic root/sinus of Valsalva and proximal and distal aortic arch/isthmus, however, it failed to show predictive risk for recoarctation.
  • Efficacy of Respiratory Muscle Training in the Immediate Postoperative Period of Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Review Article

    Aquino, Tarcísio Nema de; Prado, João Paulo; Crisafulli, Ernesto; Clini, Enrico Maria; Galdino, Giovane

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of respiratory muscle training during the immediate postoperative period of cardiac surgery on respiratory muscle strength, pulmonary function, functional capacity, and length of hospital stay. Methods: This is a systematic review and meta-analysis. A comprehensive search on PubMed®, Excerpta Medica Database (or Embase), Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (or CINAHL), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (or LILACS), Scientific Electronic Library Online (or SciELO), Physiotherapy Evidence Database (or PEDro), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases was performed. A combination of free-text words and indexed terms referring to cardiac surgery, coronary artery bypass grafting, respiratory muscle training, and clinical trials was used. A total of 792 studies were identified; after careful selection, six studies were evaluated. Results: The studies found significant improvement after inspiratory muscle training (IMT) (n = 165, 95% confidence interval [CI] 9.68, 21.99) and expiratory muscle training (EMT) (n = 135, 95% CI 8.59, 27.07) of maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure, respectively. Also, IMT increased significantly (95% CI 19.59, 349.82, n = 85) the tidal volume. However, no differences were found in the peak expiratory flow, functional capacity, and length of hospital stay after EMT and IMT. Conclusion: IMT and EMT demonstrated efficacy in improving respiratory muscle strength during the immediate postoperative period of cardiac surgery. There was no evidence indicating the efficacy of IMT for pulmonary function and length of hospital stay and the efficacy of EMT for functional capacity.
  • Pioneer of Cardiothoracic Surgery - Luiz Tavares da Silva Special Article

    Lima, Ricardo de Carvalho; Lima, Leonardo Pontual; Escobar, Mozart Augusto Soares de; Cabral, José Ricardo Lagreca de Sales; Vieira, José Aécio Fernandes; Maia, Guilherme Tavares da Silva

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Luis Tavares revolutionized cardiac surgery, always bringing the most modern instruments and equipment from his travels to England - surgical forceps, scissors, scalpels, etc. He always insisted that he was not just a thoracic surgeon, for his work extended over a wide field and created three important cardiac surgery centers which promoted a great development of cardiology. He carried out the first open heart surgery (atrial septal defect) employing extracorporeal circulation and closure of a ventricular septal defect with deep surface hypothermia of north and northeast Brazil. He promoted an intense scientific exchange program between Recife and England, resulting in significant advances in medicine, and participated directly in the creation of HEMOPE), leading to radical changes and improvements in blood therapy in the whole country. The PROCAPE, inaugurated in 2006, was the result of the cardiac center created by him in early 1970 at Hospital Oswaldo Cruz and can be considered the second largest public-university cardiology center in Brazil. He is thus widely regarded as an outstanding name in medicine in the 20th century and one of the fathers of modern cardiac surgery in Brazil.
  • Application of Cut-and-Sew Technique in Thoracoscopic Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Surgery and Concomitant Maze Procedure How I Do It

    Han, Erlei; Liu, Zhifang; Zhou, Bing; Wang, Shuwei; Hu, Zhibin; Cui, Yong

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Atrial fibrillation is one of the common complications of mitral valve disease. Currently, in the absence of freezing equipment, it’s still impossible to fully conduct a minimally invasive Cox-maze IV procedure to treat atrial fibrillation. Methods: We analyzed the clinical data of 28 patients who underwent thoracoscopic minimally invasive mitral valve full maze surgery in our hospital from October 2021 to September 2022; 13 patients were male and 15 were female, three suffered from paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, and 25 suffered from permanent atrial fibrillation; average age was 61.88±8.30 years, and mean preoperative left atrial diameter was 47.12±8.34 mm. Isolation of left atrial posterior wall (box lesion) was completed in all patients by cut-and-sew technique and bipolar clamp ablation. Results: For these subjects, the median cardiopulmonary bypass time was 169 (109.75-202.75) minutes, aortic cross-clamping time was 106 (77.75-125.50) minutes, and ventilator assistance time was 6.5 (0-10) hours. Among them, eight subjects had the endotracheal tubes removed immediately after surgical operation. Three subjects were in the blanking period; two subjects still had atrial fibrillation at three months after operation, one of whom resumed sinus rhythm after electrical cardioversion therapy; and all the remaining 23 subjects had sinus rhythm. Conclusion: The minimally invasive cut-and-sew technique for electrical isolation of left pulmonary veins can improve sinus conversion rate of patients suffering from both mitral valve disease and atrial fibrillation. In selected subjects, it is safe and has good results in the short-term postoperative period.
  • Treatment For Infected Frozen Elephant Trunk Prosthesis Caused by Propionibacterium acnes: A Surgical Challenge How I Do It

    Barca, Laura Varela; Esteban-Lucia, Laura; Tomás-Mallebrera, Marta; Pello-Lázaro, Ana; Aldámiz-Echevarría, Gonzalo

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT In this article, we present the case of a 47-year-old man who underwent Bentall-Bono procedure and frozen elephant trunk prosthesis implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation and aortic dilatation with a second-time endovascular stent-graft repair in descending aorta. Over eight years, a subacute graft infection by Propionibacterium acnes was developed, culminating in cardiogenic shock secondary to severe aortic regurgitation due to a complete aortic root dehiscence because of multiple aortic pseudoaneurysms. The patient underwent emergency surgery in which the replacement of the graft by a biological valve tube was performed accompanied by a complete debranching of the three supra-aortic vessels.
  • Is Deep Hypothermic Cardiac Arrest Mandatory in Aortic Arch Surgeries? Case Report

    Kothari, Jignesh; Gohil, Ishan; Baria, Kinneresh

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Cannulation strategies in aortic arch surgeries are a matter of immense discussion. Majority of time deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is the way out, but it does come with its set of demerits. Here we demonstrate a case with aortic arch dissection dealt with dual cannulation strategy in axillary and femoral artery without need for DHCA and ensuring complete neuroprotection of brain and spinal cord without hinderance of time factor. Inception of new ideas like this may decrease the need for DHCA and hence its drawbacks, thus decreasing the morbidity and mortality associated.
  • The Rational Contrast Between Del Nido Solution and the Approaches on Minimally Invasive Extracorporeal Technologies Letter To The Editor

    Condello, Ignazio
Sociedade Brasileira de Cirurgia Cardiovascular Rua Afonso Celso, 1178 Vila Mariana, CEP: 04119-061 - São Paulo/SP Brazil, Tel +55 (11) 3849-0341, Tel +55 (11) 5096-0079 - São Paulo - SP - Brazil
E-mail: bjcvs@sbccv.org.br