LETTER TO EDITOR FOR THE MANUSCRIPT: THE DOSE-RESPONSE PHENOMENON ASSOCIATED WITH STRENGTH TRAINING IS INDEPENDENT OF THE VOLUME OF SETS AND REPETITIONS PER SESSION

Moacir Marocolo Frederico Lopes Frazão Bruno Victor Corrêa da Silva About the authors

Dear Editor:

We carefully read the recent article by Evangelista et al. 11. Evangelista AL, Braz TV, Rica RL, Barbosa WA, Alonso AC, Azevedo JB, et al. The dose-response phenomenon associated with strength training is independent of the volume of sets and repetitions per session. Rev Bra Med Sport. 2021; 27(1):108-112. . Although the topic is interesting and relevant, we found inconsistences and impressive reported data. Thus, we would like to ask the authors some points:

  1. It would be possible to provide more details about the recruitment of volunteers? This fact becomes important, since they have not only the same age, body mass and height (table 1), but also practically the same values of one repetition maximum (1RM) loads for the biceps curl and back-squat exercises (table 2), in addition to the same muscle thickness values for the biceps brachii, brachii, triceps brachii and vastus lateralis muscles (table 3).

  2. The observed information from above topic 1, drew attention to the reported values of the study. Considering that none of the volunteers in their study had any experience with resistance training for at least six months, prior to the experimental period, how is it possible to present such incredible results for back-squat exercise: for instance, the mean values for 1RM load (back-squat) reported by the authors in table 2 (207 ± 64 kg post 8 weeks of training) are higher than the mean values achieved by the top 12 athletes in the 2020 Brazilian weightlifting championship (194.9±30.8 kg; accessed https://powerliftingbrazil.wixsite.com/cblb/2020). In other words, these 30 volunteers (mean body mass of 72 kg) included in the study of Evangelista and cols 11. Evangelista AL, Braz TV, Rica RL, Barbosa WA, Alonso AC, Azevedo JB, et al. The dose-response phenomenon associated with strength training is independent of the volume of sets and repetitions per session. Rev Bra Med Sport. 2021; 27(1):108-112. study could win the Brazilian National championship, even competing in a heavier body mass category of 74 Kg and only after 8 weeks of training instead of years! Are the authors able to reveal what is this magic pill for strength increase?

  3. In addition, even after a resistance exercise training specific protocol values of 1RM back-squat under 200 kg for subjects with higher body mass (over 82kg) and years of resistance training are described 22. Zourdos MC, Jo E, Khamoui AV, Lee SR, Park BS, Ormsbee MJ, et al. Modified Daily Undulating Periodization Model Produces Greater Performance Than a Traditional Configuration in Powerlifters. J Strength Cond Res. 2016; 30(3):784-791. . Also, on back-squat exercise, the authors 11. Evangelista AL, Braz TV, Rica RL, Barbosa WA, Alonso AC, Azevedo JB, et al. The dose-response phenomenon associated with strength training is independent of the volume of sets and repetitions per session. Rev Bra Med Sport. 2021; 27(1):108-112. found values far above average (calculated by table 2) for mean relative strength (1RM/body mass) of ∼2.1 and 2.9 at pre and post training protocol, respectively. Their values are close, or even higher, than those reported for professional strength and power athletes of 2.2 for strength-trained subjects of 2.4 for weightlifters 33. Suchomel TJ, Nimphius S, tone MH. The Importance of Muscular Strength in Athletic Performance. Sports Med. 2016; 46(10):1419-1449. .

  4. Figure 2 presents a parameter denoted as weekly accumulated total load lifted (ATLL). Since there are no references about how it was calculated, we presume it is the absolute volume load (sets x repetitions x load) 44. Scott BR, Duthie GM, Thornton HR, Dascombe BJ. Training Monitoring for Resistance Exercise: Theory and Applications. Sports Med. 2016; 46(5):687-698. . This should be amended.

  5. It was stated that all 3 protocols were performed until concentric failure (being performed maximum repetitions), and with the same rest interval (90 s) between sets. However, there is a body of evidence demonstrating a significant reduction in the number of repetitions when exercises are performed to failure with a specific load and short rest intervals 55. Willardson JM, Burkett LN. A comparison of 3 different rest intervals on the exercise volume completed during a workout. J Strength Cond Res. 2005;19(1):23-26.,66. Willardson JM, Burkett LN. The effect of rest interval length on bench press performance with heavy vs. light loads. J Strength Cond Res. 2006;20(2): 396-399. . Could this fact be explained by the authors?

References

  • 1
    Evangelista AL, Braz TV, Rica RL, Barbosa WA, Alonso AC, Azevedo JB, et al. The dose-response phenomenon associated with strength training is independent of the volume of sets and repetitions per session. Rev Bra Med Sport. 2021; 27(1):108-112.
  • 2
    Zourdos MC, Jo E, Khamoui AV, Lee SR, Park BS, Ormsbee MJ, et al. Modified Daily Undulating Periodization Model Produces Greater Performance Than a Traditional Configuration in Powerlifters. J Strength Cond Res. 2016; 30(3):784-791.
  • 3
    Suchomel TJ, Nimphius S, tone MH. The Importance of Muscular Strength in Athletic Performance. Sports Med. 2016; 46(10):1419-1449.
  • 4
    Scott BR, Duthie GM, Thornton HR, Dascombe BJ. Training Monitoring for Resistance Exercise: Theory and Applications. Sports Med. 2016; 46(5):687-698.
  • 5
    Willardson JM, Burkett LN. A comparison of 3 different rest intervals on the exercise volume completed during a workout. J Strength Cond Res. 2005;19(1):23-26.
  • 6
    Willardson JM, Burkett LN. The effect of rest interval length on bench press performance with heavy vs. light loads. J Strength Cond Res. 2006;20(2): 396-399.

Publication Dates

  • Publication in this collection
    14 June 2021
  • Date of issue
    Apr/Jun 2021
Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina do Exercício e do Esporte Av. Brigadeiro Luís Antônio, 278, 6º and., 01318-901 São Paulo SP, Tel.: +55 11 3106-7544, Fax: +55 11 3106-8611 - São Paulo - SP - Brazil
E-mail: atharbme@uol.com.br