Zoologia (Curitiba), Volume: 30, Issue: 1, Published: 2013
  • Culicidae (Diptera: Culicomorpha) from the central Brazilian Amazon: Nhamundá and Abacaxis Rivers Applied Zoology

    Hutchings, Rosa Sá Gomes; Honegger, Roger William Hutchings; Sallum, Maria Anice Mureb

    Abstract in English:

    Mosquito fauna (Culicidae) from remote areas along the geographical limits of the State of Amazonas were assessed by employing CDC, Shannon, Malaise and Suspended traps, together with net sweeping and immature collections. Two hundred and six collections were performed in seven localities along the Nhamundá and Abacaxis Rivers, State of Amazonas, Brazil, during May and June 2008. The northernmost locality was 120 km from Nhamundá, whereas the southernmost locality was 150 km from the mouth of the Abacaxis River. The 5,290 mosquitoes collected are distributed in 16 genera, representing 109 different species, of which eight are new distributional records for the State of Amazonas. Furthermore, there are nine morphospecies which may represent undescribed new taxa, five of which are also new records for the State of Amazonas. Culex presented the highest number of species and the largest number of individuals. Anopheles, which represents 3% of the total sample, had the second highest number of species, followed by Wyeomyia. Psorophora and Aedes, represent the third and fourth largest number of individuals. The most abundant species was Cx. (Mel.) vaxus Dyar, 1920 followed by Cx. (Mel.) eknomios Forattini & Sallum, 1992, Cx. (Cux.) mollis Dyar & Knab, 1906, Cx. (Mel.) theobaldi Lutz, 1904, and Cx. (Cux.) declarator Dyar & Knab, 1906. The epidemiological and ecological implications of mosquito species found are discussed and are compared with other mosquito inventories from the Amazon region. The results presented represent the largest standardized inventory of mosquitoes of the Nhamundá and Abacaxis rivers, with the identification of 118 species level taxa distributed in seven localities, within four municipalities (Nhamundá, Maués, Borba, Nova Olinda do Norte), of which we have only few or no records in the published literature.
  • Parental care behavior in the Guiana dolphin, Sotalia guianensis (Cetacea: Delphinidae), in Ilha Grande Bay, southeastern Brazil Behavior

    Tardin, Rodrigo H. O.; Espécie, Mariana A.; Lodi, Liliane; Simão, Sheila M.

    Abstract in English:

    Parental care is any form of parental behavior that increases offspring fitness. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to analyze the intensity of parental care in the Guiana dolphin, Sotalia guianensis (van Bénéden, 1864). The objectives of this study are as follows: 1) to quantify the degree of parental care in S. guianensis in Ilha Grande Bay, Rio de Janeiro; 2) to investigate the influence of behavioral state and group size on the degree of parental care; and 3) to evaluate the differences between the intensity of parental care provided to calves and juveniles. Our results indicate that the intensity of parental care is high in S. guianensis and that care is more intense in larger groups. It is possible that these differences serve to maximize hydrodynamic gains and to minimize risks. Our results suggest that parental care is more intense during travel. A possible reason for this greater intensity is that the feeding dynamics show a more random pattern than other behavioral states. Moreover, the results indicate that calves receive more intense care than juveniles. These results suggest that parent-offspring conflict is possible in the study population.
  • Seasonal habitat selection of the red deer (Cervus elaphus alxaicus) in the Helan Mountains, China Biology

    Zhang, Mingming; Liu, Zhensheng; Teng, Liwei

    Abstract in English:

    We studied the seasonal habitat selection of the red deer, Cervus elaphus alxaicus Bobrinskii & Flerov, 1935, in the Helan Mountains, China, from December 2007 to December 2008. Habitat selection varied widely by season. Seasonal movements between high and low elevations were attributed to changes in forage availability, alpine topography, the arid climate of the Helan Mountains, and potential competition with blue sheep, Pseudois nayaur (Hodgson, 1833). The use of vegetation types varied seasonally according to food availability and ambient temperature. Red deer used montane coniferous forest and alpine shrub and meadow zones distributed above 2,000 m and 3,000 m in summer, alpine shrub and meadows above 3,000 m in autumn, being restricted to lower elevation habitats in spring and winter. The winter habitat of C. elaphus alxaicus was dominated by Ulmus glaucescens Franch. and Juglans regia Linnaeus, deciduous trees, and differed from the habitats selected by other subspecies of red deer. Cervus elaphus alxaicus preferred habitats with abundant vegetation coverage to open habitats in winter, but the reverse pattern was observed in summer and autumn. Red deer preferred gentle slopes (<10°) but the use of slope gradient categories varied seasonally. Red deer avoidance of human disturbance in the Helan Mountains varied significantly by season. Information on red deer habitat selection can help understand the factors affecting seasonal movements and also support decision making in the management and conservation of red deer and their habitats.
  • Use of space by the Neotropical caviomorph rodent Thrichomys apereoides (Rodentia: Echimyidae) Biology

    Almeida, Alex José de; Freitas, Melina Maciel F.; Talamoni, Sônia A.

    Abstract in English:

    The objective of this study was to investigate some parameters of the space use by individuals in a population of the hystricognath rodent Thrichomys apereoides (Lund, 1839), using the spool-and-line tracking technique. This technique is useful for investigating characteristics of habitat use by individuals since it allows the mapping of the places where the individuals move. We evaluated three parameters of space use by 34 individuals of T. apereoides: 1) The daily home range (DHR) or the area used by individuals in their daily activities, 2) the distance moved on the leaf litter, and 3) the distance moved above ground using twigs, logs and rocks. The analysis of space use on such a small scale allows a better understanding of how individuals perceive and use the available space. The significant effect of age on DHR and the effect of the sex on the movements above ground were observed. Adult males had larger DHRs than adult females and subadults, and adult females showed the lowest displacement above ground. A statistically significant effect of the sex and seasonal period and the interaction between them was also observed on the size of DHRs of adults. During the dry season, females had lower DHRs than males and both females and males moved less on leaf litter in this season. There was no seasonal effect on the movement of males and females above ground, as well as no significant effect of age and sex on the movement of the individuals on leaf litter. We found that individuals responded differently to some aspects of the habitat structure and concluded that the pattern of movement is influenced by the sex and the age of the individuals and may vary according to ecological conditions.
  • Size-selective predation of the catfish Pimelodus pintado (Siluriformes: Pimelodidae) on the golden mussel Limnoperna fortunei (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) Biology

    Vieira, João P.; Lopes, Michelle N.

    Abstract in English:

    This paper describes the size-selective predation on Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857) by Pimelodus pintado (Azpelicueta, Lundberg & Loureiro, 2008) from the time it arrived at the Mirim Lagoon basin (2005). Sampling was carried out using bottom trawl in depths of 3-6 m, from January to November 2005, and from October to November 2008. Pimelodus pintado began to prey upon L. fortunei soon after its arrival (austral spring of 2005). On the spring of 2008, L. fortunei was found to be the most important food item of P. pintado. The variation in length of the mussels (0.7-3.2 cm, with a mode of 1.3 cm) indicates that the species is now fully established in the system. Our data indicates that large individuals of P. pintado incorporate more mussels in their diets than small individuals. However, regardless of their size, P. pintado individuals predate only on small (<1.4 cm) representatives of L. fortunei. This prey size corresponds to a phase when the mussel is more mobile and readily available for fish. Larger, more aggregated prey groups that are attached to hard substrates are avoided by fish predators.
  • Assessing the efficacy of hair snares as a method for noninvasive sampling of Neotropical felids Biology

    Portella, Tatiana P.; Bilski, Diego R.; Passos, Fernando C.; Pie, Marcio R.

    Abstract in English:

    Hair snares have been used in North and Central America for a long time in assessment and monitoring studies of several mammalian species. This method can provide a cheap, suitable, and efficient way to monitor mammals because it combines characteristics that are not present in most alternative techniques. However, despite their usefulness, hair snares are rarely used in other parts of the world. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of hair snares and three scent lures (cinnamon, catnip, and vanilla) in the detection of felids in one of the largest remnants of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We performed tests with six captive felid species - Panthera onca (Linnaeus, 1758), Leopardus pardalis (Linnaeus, 1758), L. tigrinus (Schreber, 1775), L. wiedii (Schinz, 1821), Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771), and P. yagouaroundi (É. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1803) - to examine their responses to the attractants, and to correlate those with lure efficiency in the field. The field tests were conducted at the Parque Estadual Pico do Marumbi, state of Paraná, Brazil. Hair traps were placed on seven transects. There were equal numbers of traps with each scent lure, for a total of 1,551 trap-days. In captivity, vanilla provided the greatest response, yet no felids were detected in the field with any of the tested lures, although other species were recorded. Based on the sampling of non-target species, and the comparison with similar studies elsewhere, this study points to a possible caveat of this method when rare species or small populations are concerned. Meanwhile, we believe that improved hair snares could provide important results with several species in the location tested and others.
  • The spatial distribution of the subtidal benthic macrofauna and its relationship with environmental factors using geostatistical tools: a case study in Trapandé Bay, southern Brazil Ecology

    Souza, Fernanda M. de; Gilbert, Eliandro R.; Camargo, Maurício G. de; Pieper, Wagner W.

    Abstract in English:

    Modeling the distribution patterns of the estuarine macrobenthic community has revealed itself as a difficult task due to spatio-temporal heterogeneity. This study uses ordinary kriging and Poisson modeling to generate distribution maps of the subtidal benthic macrofauna in the Trapandé Bay (southeastern Brazil). Samples were taken in duplicate from 36 locations distributed along nine transects perpendicular to the main estuarine axis in October 2006 and March 2007. One-hundred and seventy taxa belonging to 12 phyla, were identified, with dominance of Annelida Polychaeta. Distribution maps were prepared to illustrate the total density, the number of species and the six most numerous taxa, as well as abiotic parameters. The general distribution pattern has revealed that the greatest number of species and the highest densities are at the estuary mouth, decreasing towards its inner areas. However the temporal and spatial changes observed at the estuary mouth have clearly shown the impact of environmental variations such as nutrients and freshwater input, attributed to increased rainfall in March. The increased flow in the Cananeia Sea, coming from the drainage basin, produces major changes in sediment and faunal composition. Ordinary kriging associated with Poisson modeling has proved to be a powerful and promising tool for modeling the macrofauna, despite the fact that it is not frequently used due to the scarcity of appropriate software.
  • The surface morphology of the ctenidia of Spondylus spinosus (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from Antalya Bay, Turkey Morphology And Physiology

    Aksit, Deniz; Mutaf, Beria Falakali; Balci, Ahmet

    Abstract in English:

    The surface morphology of the ctenidia of Spondylus spinosus Schreibers, 1793 was studied with light and scanning electron microscopy for comparison with the gill structures of other bivalves. The demibranch of S. spinosus is heterorhabdic, with the principal filaments at the descending lamellae and ordinary filaments at the ascending lamellae. The gill lamellae have a prominent gauze-like structure at their distal part, with numerous groups of eight ordinary filaments. They bear ciliary arrays on their frontal surfaces and ostia at their latero-frontal surfaces. Frequent cirral plates form regular interfilamentary junctions. The description of the gill structure of S. spinosus presented here can be used to derive implications for the correlations among the structure, habitat and mode of life of this species. At a particular stage of its adult life, Spondylus spinosus could be used as a subject for biomonitoring studies in natural and experimental environments.
  • Morphology and 18S rDNA gene sequence of Spirostomum minus and Spirostomum teres (Ciliophora: Heterotrichea) from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Morphology And Physiology

    Fernandes, Noemi M.; Silva Neto, Inácio D. da

    Abstract in English:

    Species of Spirostomum Ehrenberg, 1838 are widely used as model organisms in ecological studies of environmental impacts and symbioses between ciliates and human pathogenic bacteria. However, the taxonomy of this genus is confused by the superficiality of the morphological descriptions of its included species, and the use of only a few characters for their differentiation. The present study provides details of total infraciliature, nuclear apparatus, morphometric data and 18S rDNA gene sequences of Spirostomum teres Claparède & Lachmann, 1858 and Spirostomum minus Roux, 1901, isolated from a sewage treatment plant and a freshwater lake in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, respectively. For the morphological descriptions of S. teres and S. minus, living cells were observed using bright-field and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy, the total infraciliature and nuclear apparatus were revealed by staining with protargol, and ciliary patterns were observed also with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The complete sequences of the 18S rDNA of S. teres and S. minus were obtained using eukaryotic universal primers, and then compared with sequences of other species and populations of Spirostomum deposited in the GenBank database. Living S. minus measured 400-800 µm in length and 55-115 µm in width, with the following characteristics: adoral zone of membranelles approximately 112 µm long; inconspicuous paroral kinety; 30-40 kineties in somatic ciliature; moniliform macronucleus with 9-25 nodes, approximately 12 micronuclei; single and posterior contractile vacuole; and yellow-brown cytoplasm. Living and fully extended S. teres measured approximately 250 µm in length and 65 ìm in width, with the following characteristics: adoral zone of membranelles approximately 92 µm long; approximately 30 somatic kineties; compact macronucleus, approximately five micronuclei; macronuclear groove present; single and posterior contractile vacuole; and colorless cytoplasm. Evidence from 18S rDNA sequences confirms the identification of S. teres and suggests the existence of cryptic species closely related to S. minus. The use of silver impregnation technique (protargol) allowed the observation and description of a greater number of characters in S. minus and S. teres, thus assisting the research that require identification of these species.
  • Molecular evidence for the polyphyly of Bostryx (Gastropoda: Bulimulidae) and genetic diversity of Bostryx aguilari Systematics And Evolution

    Ramirez, Jorge L.; Ramírez, Rina

    Abstract in English:

    Bostryx is largely distributed in Andean Valleys and Lomas formations along the coast of Peru and Chile. One species, Bostryx aguilari, is restricted to Lomas formations located in the Department of Lima (Peru). The use of genetic information has become essential in phylogenetic and population studies with conservation purposes. Considering the rapid degradation of desert ecosystems, which threatens the survival of vulnerable species, the aim of this study was, first, to resolve evolutionary relationships within Bostryx and to determine the position of Bostryx within the Bulimulidae, and second, to survey the genetic diversity of Bostryx aguilari, a species considered rare. Sequences of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA and nuclear rRNA regions were obtained for 12 and 11 species of Bulimulidae, respectively, including seven species of Bostryx. Sequences of the 16S rRNA gene were obtained for 14 individuals (from four different populations) of Bostryx aguilari. Phylogenetic reconstructions were carried out using Neighbor-Joining, Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference methods. The monophyly of Bostryx was not supported. In our results, B. solutus (type species of Bostryx) grouped only with B. aguilari, B. conspersus, B. modestus, B. scalariformis and B. sordidus, forming a monophyletic group that is strongly supported in all analyses. In case the taxonomy of Bostryx is reviewed in the future, this group should keep the generic name. Bostryx aguilari was found to have both low genetic diversity and small population size. We recommend that conservation efforts should be increased in Lomas ecosystems to ensure the survival of B. aguilari, and a large number of other rare species restricted to Lomas.
  • First record of Thylaeodus (Gastropoda: Vermetidae) from the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean, with the description of a new species Taxonomy And Nomenclature

    Spotorno, Paula; Simone, Luiz Ricardo L.

    Abstract in English:

    The vermetid Thylaeodus equatorialis sp. nov. is endemic to the São Pedro and São Paulo Archipelago, located at the mid equatorial Atlantic Ocean. The species is closely related to Thylaeodus rugulosus (Monterosato, 1878), as indicated by similar shell characters, coloration of the soft parts, and feeding tube scars. However, T. equatorialis sp. nov. mainly differs from T. rugulosus in the operculum/aperture diameter ratio (~79% versus 100%), by having well developed pedal tentacles and fewer egg capsules in brooding females. In addition, the new species has the following unique characteristics: size almost twice as large (shell, tube aperture, erect feeding tube, protoconch and egg capsules) as the other Atlantic species; unusual method of brooding egg capsules; radula with prominent and more numerous flanking cusps; and small pustules following the suture of the protoconch. A detailed discussion on the taxonomy and biology of vermetid Thylaeodus and allies is also presented.
  • A new species of Anna (Mollusca: Neogastropoda: Buccinidae) from Brazil Taxonomy And Nomenclature

    Coltro, José; Dornellas, Ana Paula S.

    Abstract in English:

    Anna capixaba, a new species found in depths of 45-60 m off the coast of the state of Espírito Santo, southeastern Brazil, is herein described. The new species is mainly characterized by a teleoconch of 4.5 whorls, weakly demarcated from the protoconch; sculptured by rounded, prominent, narrowly-separated, spiral threads; outer lip with 5-6 teeth, posterior tooth stronger; columella with two plicae, smooth.
  • A new species of Melloina (Araneae: Paratropididae) from Venezuela Taxonomy And Nomenclature

    Bertani, Rogério

    Abstract in English:

    A new species of Melloina Brignoli, 1985, Melloina santuario sp. nov., is described from a cave in Venezuela. This is the third species described in this rarely sampled genus, and the first species known from both male and female. The male of M. santuario sp. nov. is distinguished by a longer embolus and fewer number of spines on the anterior tarsi. Females and immatures are distinguished by having fewer numbers of labial cuspules. The description of a new species from male and female samples increases our knowledge about Melloina. This added knowledge is important to the understanding of mygalomorph relationships, mainly in the Theraphosoidina, as Melloina is a basal genus within the Paratropididae.
  • Redescription of Avicularia taunayi and notes on its habitat and geographical distribution (Araneae: Theraphosidae: Aviculariinae) Taxonomy And Nomenclature

    Bertani, Rogério; Motta, Paulo Cesar

    Abstract in English:

    We redescribe the poorly known tarantula species Avicularia taunayi (Mello-Leitão, 1920) and present information on its geographical distribution and habits. The spermatheca of the female is unusual for the genus: short, broad, with a median slight curvature and lobes on its basal, median and distal portions. The male resembles other Avicularia species but can be distinguished by the presence of a tibial apophysis on leg I in conjunction with legs I and IV having roughly the same length and the presence of pale rings on the distal femora, tibiae and metatarsi. Additionally, males and females have three pairs of light brown spots extending from the dorsum to the lateral region of the abdomen. Avicularia taunayi is found in the Brazilian Cerrado, a savannah-like biome. It is one of the aviculariine species with the southernmost distribution, reaching as far South as the Tropic of Capricorn.
  • Preventing injuries caused by radiotelemetry collars in reintroduced red-rumped agoutis, Dasyprocta leporina (Rodentia: Dasyproctidae), in Atlantic Forest, southeastern Brazil Short Communication

    Cid, Bruno; Costa, Rodrigo de C. da; Balthazar, Daniel de A.; Augusto, Anderson M.; Pires, Alexandra S.; Fernandez, Fernando A. S.

    Abstract in English:

    Reintroduction has been recognized as a powerful conservation tool, but in order to ensure its success, animal monitoring is highly recommended. One way to monitor released animals is to put radiotelemetry collars on them. These devices, however, can harm the subjects, causing serious wounds. Our objectives in this work were to describe the injuries caused by a radiotelemetry collar model on reintroduced agoutis and to propose modifications to it. We equipped agoutis with TXE-311C radio collars (Telenax Wildlife Telemetry) before releasing them in the wild. They acquired serious wounds and one animal died. We then modified the collar structure to reduce its width and retention of water. After these modifications, the injuries did not occur again. As reintroduction is an expensive conservation strategy, any improvement that maximize its probability of success is important. We believe that the improvements we propose here have the potential to enhance the success of reintroductions and to increase animal welfare. This recommendation is more important when captive animals are re-introduced, because they tend to have lower immunity, particularly when they are released in rainy habitats.
  • How much effort should be employed for surveying a low-diversity Amazonian mammal assemblage using line-transects? Short Communication

    Mourthé, Ítalo

    Abstract in English:

    Line-transect surveys are commonly used for sampling large mammals, but estimates of the effort needed to reliably surveying low-diversity assemblages of mammals are scarce. Using data from line-transects and species accumulation curves, I examined whether or not a sampling effort previously suggested to survey mammals elsewhere (ca. 85-100 km) would be satisfactory for surveying a low-diversity assemblage of large mammals in the Rio Negro basin in northern Amazonia. In total, 14 mammals were recorded after an accumulated effort of 690 km walked. The desired threshold of completeness was only achieved in one of six transects after an average effort of 115 km surveyed. Considering the entire landscape (all transects pooled), survey completeness was reached after a much higher effort. Moreover, the theoretical effort required to achieve completeness was estimated to be 150-360 km per transect, and 512 km for the landscape. Further studies are required to fully understand this issue, but meanwhile it is safest to assume that higher sampling efforts should be employed when surveying low-diversity assemblages through diurnal line-transects in northwestern Amazonia to get robust estimates of mammal richness.
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