Sort publications by
Zoologia (Curitiba), Volume: 39, Published: 2022
  • Three new Dactylogyrus species (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) and redescription of one other, gill parasites of five Labeo spp. (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) from the Sanaga basin (Cameroon, Central Africa) Research Article

    Fankoua, Sévérin-Oscar; Bassock Bayiha, Etienne Didier; Bitja Nyom, Arnold Roger; Rahmouni, Imane; Njan Nlôga, Alexandre Michel; Bilong Bilong, Charles Félix

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Three new and one already known species of Dactylogyrus Diesing, 1850 are described from five species of Labeo (Cyprinidae) sampled in the middle section of the Sanaga hydrosystem (Centre Region-Cameroon): Dactylogyrus sanagaensis sp. nov. from Labeo sanagaensis Tshibwabwa, 1997, L. nunensis Pellegrin, 1929, L. camerunensis Trewavas, 1974 and L. annectens Boulenger, 1903; Dactylogyrus nachtigalensis sp. nov. and D. yassensis Musilová, Řehulková & Gelnar, 2009 from Labeo batesii Boulenger, 1911; and Dactylogyrus djimensis sp. nov. from Labeo camerunensis. Dactylogyrus sanagaensis sp. nov. is close to D. longiphalloides, D. longiphallus, D. leonis, D. marocanus, and D. dembae, however it can be easily distinguished from these species by the size of MCO. Dactylogyrus nachtigalensis sp. nov. is similar to D. dembae and D. sanagaensis sp. nov. but this new species can be mainly differentiated by the length of penis. Dactylogyrus djimensis sp. nov. mostly similar to D. omega can be differentiated from it by the penis diameter. Dactylogyrus yassensis collected from Cameroon doesn’t significantly differ morphometrically from the original description, thus extends the distribution of this species to Sanaga basin. Monogenean species collected from Labeo spp. in the middle section of the Sanaga hydrosystem were classified into two morphological groups: the ‘pseudanchoratus-like group’ and the ‘cyclocirrus-like group’ newly defined herein. Phylogenetic relationships are suggested among Dactylogyrus species.
  • Perspectives and challenges on isotopic ecology of terrestrial birds in Brazil Review Article

    Navarro, Ana Beatriz; Magioli, Marcelo; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Silveira, Luís Fábio

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Although stable isotopes have been increasingly used in ornithology since 1980 in many places, Brazil has been slow in adopting this methodology, especially when it comes to terrestrial birds. The most common elements in bird ecology studies are carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen, and oxygen stable isotopes, which provide information on diet, trophic interactions, habitat use, migration, geographic patterns, and physiology. It is important that Brazilian ornithologists become aware of the potential of stable isotope analysis in ecological studies, and the shortcomings of this tool. The use of stable isotopes to study bird ecology has great potential in Brazil, since many ecological questions about Neotropical birds can be addressed by it (e.g., resource and habitat use, migratory routes, isotopic niches, anthropogenic impacts, individual specialization). Brazilian museums and other Natural History collections can provide samples to study long-term temporal dynamics in bird ecology. Additionally, the integration of avian tissue sample information into a database may increase the collaboration among researchers and promote sample reuse in a variety of studies. All biomes in Brazil have been under pressure from anthropogenic impacts (e.g., land-use change, habitat loss, fragmentation, intensive agriculture), affecting several taxa, including terrestrial birds. Considering the negative effects of human expansion over natural areas and that stable isotopes provide useful ecological information, ornithologists in Brazil should increase their use of this tool in the future.
  • Bat fly (Diptera: Streblidae) and common vampire bat (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) association in Honduras: prevalence, mean intensity, infracommunities and influence of the biological characteristics of the host Research Article

    Gómez-Corea, Wilson; España, Farlem G.; Mejía-Quintanilla, David; Alvarez, Martín R. del Valle

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Bat species present a series of attributes that makes them prone to being parasitized. Bat flies (Streblidae) are hematophagous ectoparasites exclusive to bats. Our study aimed to investigate the association of bat flies with the Common vampire bat, Desmodus rotundus (É. Geoffroy, 1810), in Honduras. We analyzed the effect of sex and age of the host on parasitism. Eight localities belonging to six departments were sampled in an altitudinal range between 50 and 995 m. Field data were obtained between May 2018 to November 2019 and 80 individuals were captured, from which 395 bat flies were extracted. Four species of bat flies were registered: Strebla wiedemanni Kolenati, 1856, Trichobius parasiticus Gervais, 1844, T. joblingi Wenzel, 1966 and T. caecus Edwards, 1948. Trichobius parasiticus presented the highest prevalence and mean intensity, followed by S. wiedemanni. Trichobius joblingi and T. caecus are new records of parasitism on D. rotundus for Honduras, although we consider as an accidental association. We recorded six types of infracommunities that parasitized 85% of the hosts. The prevalence and mean intensity was not affected by age and sex of the host for any bat fly species.
  • Individual variation in the advertisement call of Aplastodiscus albosignatus (Anura: Hylidae) is correlated with body size and environmental temperature Research Article

    Moser, Camila F.; Schuck, Laura Kauer; Olmedo, Gabriela Morais; Lingnau, Rodrigo

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT The importance of amphibian bioacoustics is widely documented in ecological, taxonomical and evolutionary studies, as calls might act as a primary mechanism of reproductive isolation. The influence of air temperature and male size on the variation of the advertisement calls in anurans is widely recognized but still insufficiently analyzed in Brazilian species. Our goals were to (1) describe the advertisement call of Aplastodiscus albosignatus (Lutz & Lutz, 1938), (2) test the influence of temperature and body size on its acoustic signals and (3) evaluate the variation of within and between-male acoustic signals. Advertisement calls of A. albosignatus consist of an unpulsed note with four harmonics. In most cases, the dominant frequency is the third harmonic but, in some calls, it was the minimum frequency (first harmonic). The average duration of calls was 0.191 s, the interval between calls was 2.08 s and the repetition rate was 33 calls per minute. On average, the minimum frequency was 550.15 Hz, the maximum frequency was 3531.70 Hz and the third harmonic was 2498.9 Hz. To evaluate the effect of air temperature, and body size on the variation of call parameters, we performed generalized linear models. The most explanatory model for spectral parameters was temperature plus body size. Concerning temporal variables, the best model that explains the variation in call duration was body size, while for the interval between calls was air temperature. The maximum frequency and the frequency of the third harmonic had little variation in the calls of both the same male and different males. Thus, these parameters were considered important in species recognition.
  • Inter-group conflicts involving adult female and male bearded capuchins, Sapajus libidinosus (Primates: Cebidae), in the context of provisioned resources: resource defense or sexual selection? Research Article

    Lousa, Túlio Costa; Mendes, Francisco Dyonísio Cardoso

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Intergroup conflicts are energetically more costly than intra-group disputes, and thus typically occur in contexts in which the energetic returns are relatively high. In anthropogenic environments, provisioned resources tend to be rich in energy and highly agglomerated. While females are expected to defend provisioned resources, the adult males, in turn, are expected to defend the females. Based on this premise, the present study focused on an urban forest in the city of Goiânia (Goiás, Brazil), which is inhabited by two groups of bearded capuchins. Behavioral data were collected using instantaneous scan sampling and all-events records to document intergroup conflicts and define their context. We used a backward logistic regression and stepwise linear regression to analyze the participation of the individuals in the conflicts. Conflicts were more frequent in the context of provisioning, although the number of neither females nor males involved in the conflict varied significantly between contexts. The females did avoid participating in conflicts involving adult males, however, to minimize the risk of being attacked by them. The adult males participated more in the presence of other adult males, which is partly consistent with the hypothesis of the defense of reproductive partners. The conflicts were not more intense in the context of provisioned resources, which contrasted with expectations. The hierarchical relationship between the two study groups, and the fact that the groups were derived from the same social unit, may have contributed to a reduction in the intensity of the conflicts.
  • A new species of Megaspira (Stylommatophora: Megaspiridae) from Ilha Grande, Southeast Brazil Research Article

    Daniel, Victor R.; Ovando, Ximena M.C.; Santos, Sonia B.

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Megaspiridae include land snails with a tall spire. They occur in Brazil, New Guinea and Australia. Megaspira Lea, 1839 is distributed through the central and southeast regions of Brazil There is controversy regarding the number of species in the genus, and their taxonomic status. The characters used to identify Megaspira include a large cylindrical shell and internal armature in the columella. The goal of the present study is to describe a new species for the genus, based on shell morphology, microsculpture and the inner anatomy. These anatomic characters had not been described before for any of the included species. The material was collected at the Jararaca trail, Ilha Grande (Angra dos Reis, state of Rio de Janeiro). Seven linear measurements were taken from the shells. Megaspira adenticulata sp. nov. differs from the other species of the genus by not having apertural lamella in the shell aperture or in the columella in adult specimens. Also, the shell does not have light brown spots, as observed in other species of Megaspira. The shell has a mean of 16 whorls and height of 27 mm. It is smaller in average size than the shell of other described species. The new species was found under leaf litter, especially near rocks and in shallow soil.
  • One size doesn’t fit all: Singularities in bat species richness and activity patterns in wind-energy complexes in Brazil and implications for environmental assessment Research Article

    Pereira, Carolina Goecking; Falcão, Fábio; Bernard, Enrico

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Wind energy is an important electricity source. Even though it is cleaner than other energy sources in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, gathering energy from the wind has impact on organisms that fly, including bats. Understanding whether and how bat activity patterns are affected by environmental variables may be useful when trying to mitigate these impacts, for example bat mortality from collisions with wind turbines. Northeastern Brazil concentrates one of the world’s largest wind potentials and has thousands of wind turbines in operation. In spite of this scenario, there is a lack of basic information, such as the presence of bat species and their activity patterns in those wind farms. We used passive acoustic monitoring to assess species richness and species composition and obtain data on activity patterns of insectivorous bats in four wind farm complexes in northeastern Brazil. We also investigated the possible correlation between environmental variables (wind speed and direction, air temperature and humidity, and percentage of moon illumination) and bat activity. The acoustic monitoring carried out for 30 nights produced approximately 120,000 bat passes of 29 sonotypes and four families. Environmental variables may influence bat activity, but in a site-specific way, i.e., although the environmental conditions of wind-energy complexes were similar, there was not an activity pattern common to all. Considering such specificities, we strongly recommend long-term specific on-site monitoring in each wind complex, avoiding generalizations for the environmental licensing of wind energy in Brazil.
  • Redescription of Myotis atacamensis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) with neotype designation Research Article

    Novaes, Roberto Leonan M.; LaVal, Richard K.; Wilson, Don E.; Moratelli, Ricardo

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Myotis atacamensis (Lataste, 1892) was described based on three syntypes from San Pedro de Atacama, Chile. The type series is lost. The original description was based on few external and cranial characters, and the diagnosis became obsolete and useless considering the current diversity of South American Myotis. Based on 12 specimens of M. atacamensis from southern Peru and northern Chile, we provide a morphological comparison with its South American congeners, designate a neotype, and provide a new diagnosis.
  • Anomocephalobus, a new genus of minute marsh-loving beetles from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber (Coleoptera: Limnichidae) Research Article

    Li, Yan-Da; Yu, Ya-Li; Jäch, Manfred A.; Huang, Di-Ying; Cai, Chen-Yang

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT Limnichidae are currently a moderately diverse beetle family with a sparse fossil record. Here we describe a new limnichid genus and species, Anomocephalobus liuhaoi Li, Jäch & Cai gen. et sp. nov., from the mid-Cretaceous amber from northern Myanmar. Anomocephalobus gen. nov. is tentatively assigned to the extant subfamily Cephalobyrrhinae, based on its transverse metacoxae, 5-segmented protarsi, and absence of grooves on the ventral surface for reception of legs, though its oval body shape is somewhat deviating from extant Cephalobyrrhinae. The generic placement of the recently described Erichia cretacea Yu, Ślipiński, Ren & Pang, 2018 is also discussed.
  • Andanus tambopixunensis sp. nov., a new species of the remarkable leafhopper genus Andanus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Deltocephalinae), generic redescription and two new synonyms with new placements Research Article

    Pinedo-Escatel, J. Adilson; Dietrich, Christopher H.; Zahniser, James N.

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT A new species of the leafhopper genus Andanus Linnavuori, 1959 (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Deltocephalinae: Athysanini), A. tambopixunensis sp. nov., is described. Materials studied were intercepted using Malaise and light traps in the Tambopata National Reserve (Peru) and the Amazonian Forest (Brazil). The genera Perundanus Zanol, 1993 syn. nov. and Paralaca Lozada, 1998 syn. nov. are recognized as junior synonyms of Andanus based on morphological comparison. The type species of Perundanus and Paralaca, A. raunoi (Zanol, 1993) comb. nov. and A. sordidus (Lozada, 1998) comb. nov., respectively, are transferred to Andanus. A detailed redescription of the genus and illustrations of external and genital morphology are provided as well as a key to the known species. The new species differs from other species in having a pygofer without processes, subgenital plates divergent, and aedeagus with a pair of short dorsoapical and single ventroapical spine. Comparative notes on morphological similarities of Andanus to other Neotropical Athysanini genera are discussed.
  • Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of the Parque Estadual São Camilo, an isolated Atlantic Forest remnant in western Paraná, Brazil Research Article

    Ladino, Natalia; Feitosa, Rodrigo Machado

    Abstract in English:

    ABSTRACT We provide a list for the ants collected in the leaf litter, soil and vegetation of the Parque Estadual São Camilo, an important conservation unit of Atlantic Forest in Paraná, Brazil, and one of the oldest in the state. We report 108 species, of which eight species and two genera represent new records for Southern Brazil. Seven species are reported for the first time in Paraná. Our work is the first ant list for the western limit of the state, and reveals a surprisingly high number of species considering the extension of the study area. We highlight the importance of integrating different sampling techniques to explore ant diversity, and to conduct baseline studies in protected areas to document biodiversity.
Sociedade Brasileira de Zoologia Caixa Postal 19020, 81531-980 Curitiba PR Brasil, Tel./Fax: (55 41) 3266-6823 - Curitiba - PR - Brazil
E-mail: sbz@sbzoologia.org.br