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Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem

On-line version ISSN 1518-8345

Abstract

NOGUEIRA, Paula Cristina; CALIRI, Maria Helena Larcher  and  HAAS, Vanderlei José. Profile of patients with spinal cord injuries and occurrence of pressure ulcer at a university hospital. Rev. Latino-Am. Enfermagem [online]. 2006, vol.14, n.3, pp.372-377. ISSN 1518-8345.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0104-11692006000300010.

Patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) have an increased risk of developing pressure ulcers (PU). It is a retrospective study done by review of records in order to identify the characteristics of patients who were assisted at a tertiary hospital as well as the occurrence of PU. Most patients were male, white and 36,2% between 21 and 30 years. The most common causes of TSCI were wound by fire weapons followed by vehicle crash/overturn. There was a predominance of injury at the toracic level followed by cervical. The PU occurred in 20 pacientes (42,5%). The most frequent regions of occurrence were the sacral and heels. Only 25% of the records had PU's dimensions charted, 80% stated the aspect, and 52.1% did not state the stage. There is a need for better documentation of PU so that interventions used for treatment can be evaluated.

Keywords : spinal cord injuries; decubitus ulcer; nursing care; nursing.

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