Human IgE responses to Schistosoma mansoni and resistance to reinfection

David W. Dunne Anthony E. Butterworth Anthony J. C. Fulford John H. Ouma Robert F. Sturrock About the authors

Abstract

Schistosoma mansoni infected Kenyan patients were treated and the intensities of their reinfections were followed over the next two years. in addition, their pre- and six month post-treatment serum levels of IgG1-4, IgM, and IgE, specific for schistosoma, egg and adult worm, were measured in ELISA. No reinfection took place before six months post-treatment. Reinfection intensities varied with age; the younger children becoming reinfected at significantly higher intensities than older individuals. When antibody and reinfection levels were compared, only the six month post-treatment IgE response against adult worm correlated negatively with intensities of reinfection and, therefore, was predictive of resistance or immunity to reinfection. IgE and IgG specific Western Blots were carried out. The adult worm antigens recognized by IgE were restricted compared with the IgG responses of the same patients, although no individual antigen was uniquely recognized by the IgE isotype. A dominant 22 kDa antigen was recognized by most but not all high IgE responders. Patients with IgE responses against this antigen suffered significantly lower subsequent levels of reinfection, compared with non-responders. A monospecific rabbit antiserum against the 22KDa adult worm antigen showed that this antigen is specifically located in the tegument of the adult worm and of 'lung' and 'liver' stage schistosomula, but is absent from the early 'skin' schistosomula. It is possible that this antigen is a target for human IgE mediated immune effector mechanisms active against the post skin stage schistosomula and that this is boosted by the death of adult worms.

Schistosoma mansoni; resistance; human IgE


ABSTRACT

Human IgE responses to Schistosoma mansoni and resistance to reinfection

David W. Dunne1

Anthony E. Butterworth1

Anthony J. C. Fulford1

John H. Ouma2

Robert F. Sturrock3

University of Cambridge, Department of Pathology, Cambridge, UK

Kenya. Ministry of Health, Division of Vector Borne Diseases, Nairobi, Kenya

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Department of Medical Parasitology, London, UK

Schistosoma mansoni infected Kenyan patients were treated and the intensities of their reinfections were followed over the next two years. in addition, their pre- and six month post-treatment serum levels of IgG1-4, IgM, and IgE, specific for schistosoma, egg and adult worm, were measured in ELISA. No reinfection took place before six months post-treatment. Reinfection intensities varied with age; the younger children becoming reinfected at significantly higher intensities than older individuals. When antibody and reinfection levels were compared, only the six month post-treatment IgE response against adult worm correlated negatively with intensities of reinfection and, therefore, was predictive of resistance or immunity to reinfection. IgE and IgG specific Western Blots were carried out. The adult worm antigens recognized by IgE were restricted compared with the IgG responses of the same patients, although no individual antigen was uniquely recognized by the IgE isotype. A dominant 22 kDa antigen was recognized by most but not all high IgE responders. Patients with IgE responses against this antigen suffered significantly lower subsequent levels of reinfection, compared with non-responders. A monospecific rabbit antiserum against the 22KDa adult worm antigen showed that this antigen is specifically located in the tegument of the adult worm and of 'lung' and 'liver' stage schistosomula, but is absent from the early 'skin' schistosomula. It is possible that this antigen is a target for human IgE mediated immune effector mechanisms active against the post skin stage schistosomula and that this is boosted by the death of adult worms.

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Publication Dates

  • Publication in this collection
    04 June 2009
  • Date of issue
    1992
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