Motriz: Revista de Educação Física, Volume: 28, Issue: spe2, Published: 2022
  • Determination of somatotype and physical activity level in frailty older adults Acute And Chronic Effects Of Exercise In Health

    Marques, Suélen Gomes dos Santos; Villar, Rodrigo; Marcon, Liliane de Faria; João, Gustavo Allegretti; Rica, Roberta Luksevicius; Bocalini, Danilo Sales; Pontes Júnior, Francisco Luciano

    Abstract in English:

    Abstract Aim: To determine the somatotype profile and level of physical activity in older adults. Methods: Seventy-two older adults were divided into two groups: frail (F = 33) and non-frail (NF = 39). Frailty status was determined using the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI), somatotype using the Heath and Carter method, and physical activity by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Results: Somatotype analysis showed a predominance of endomorphy (F = 6.54 ± 1.65 vs NF = 6.12 ± 2.07 p ≤ 0.350) followed by mesomorphy (F = 3.44 ± 1.62 vs NF = 3.15 ± 2.19, p ≤ 0.531) and ectomorphy (F = 0.82 ± 0.99 vs NF = 0.95 ± 0.86 p ≤ 0.163), but no significant differences were observed between groups. Regarding PA, twenty-eight participants (84.7%) of the F group were classified as sedentary and insufficiently active and twenty-one (53.8%) of NF were classified as active and very active. This difference in PA explains the higher total energy expenditure found in NF (median 1,087.43; IAQ = 3,954.30) when compared to F (median = 0.0; IAQ = 462.64 p ≤ 0.001). The frailty group presented a higher endomorphic component as well as lower levels of physical activity and energy expenditure. Conclusion: Endomorphy was the predominant somatotype in F and NF older adults, followed by mesomorphy and actomorphy this profile can affect activities of daily living, functional capacity, and independent living and be associated with chronic diseases.
  • Functional capacity and quality of life of older adults practitioners of câmbio: a cross-sectional study Acute And Chronic Effects Of Exercise In Health

    Domingues, Lucas Betti; Medeiros, Luciana Ribas; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Ferrari, Rodrigo

    Abstract in English:

    Abstract Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the levels of functional capacity and quality of life in older adult practitioners of câmbio. Methods: This is a cross-sectional analytic study that evaluated men and women aged over 60 years, practitioners of câmbio in the Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The participants underwent a functional capacity assessment, composed of the sit- and stand-up and handgrip tests. In addition, quality of life was assessed through the WHOQOL-bref questionnaire. Results: Participants were 69 ± 6 years and had a body mass index of 27.9 ± 4.1 kg/m2. The participants practiced câmbio approximately 2.7 ± 1.2 times per week. Regarding the quality of life, results according to the domains of the questionnaire, it was observed that the participants presented values above 75% of the maximum possible. Regarding the performance in the sit- and stand-up test, participants had mean of 22 repetitions (95%CI: 20 to 23) and the average time for 5 repetitions was 7.1 seconds (6.8 to 7.5). In the grip strength test, participants had mean 35 kg (95%CI: 33.7 to 38.2). Conclusion: Older adult practitioners of câmbio presented satisfactory levels of quality of life and a good functional capacity.
  • The execution order of the concurrent training and its effects on static and dynamic balance, and muscle strength of elderly people Acute And Chronic Effects Of Exercise In Health

    Silva, Juliana Cristina; Brandão, Eduardo Martins; Puga, Guilherme Morais; Kanitz, Ana Carolina

    Abstract in English:

    Abstract Aim: Assess the effect of the performance order in the Concurrent Training (CT), Aerobic-Strength (AS), and Strength-Aerobic (SA), in the static balance, dynamic balance, and muscle strength in elderly people. Methods: The study involved 38 elderly people (men and women) aged 60 to 75 years old, divided into SA (n = 19) and AS (n = 19). Within 12 weeks, the aerobic training consisted of walking with intensity prescribed by the Borg's Rating of Perceived Exertion (6-20) and the strength training consisted of six exercises, with intensity controlled by Repetition Maximum training zones. Static balance (plantar pressure center area and displacement in bipedal support with eyes closed and open), dynamic balance (Timed Up and Go and Tandem Gait), and maximum dynamic strength of knee extension and bench press have been evaluated. For data analysis, Generalized Estimating Equations with Bonferroni's complimentary test have been used (α = 0.05). Results: For static and dynamic balance there hasn't been an effect on the 12 weeks of combined training, regardless of the performance order. Both groups maintained the balance variables within the intervention period. When it comes to strength, there has been a noticeable improvement in lower limbs (SA: 16%; AS: 11%; p < 0,001) and upper (SA: 22.0%; AS: 8.7%; p < 0.001), without any differences between the groups. Conclusion: So there is no difference between the order of performance of the CT in the variables of static and dynamic balance and strength of upper and lower limbs. Furthermore, after training, there have been significant improvements in the variables of strength and maintenance of static and dynamic balance.
  • Psychophysiological effects of different execution speeds of single bout exercise in outdoor fitness equipment performed by older men Sports Science

    Barbosa, Welmo Alcântara; Rica, Roberta Luksevicius; Pontes Junior, Francisco Luciano; Reis, Victor Machado; Bergamin, Marco; Bocalini, Danilo Sales

    Abstract in English:

    Abstract Aims: This study aimed to investigate the effects of different cadences of movement in ATI equipment on the psychophysiological parameters of older adults during the training session. Methods: Fifteen physically independent older men voluntarily participated in this study. Three 30-min exercise sessions were randomly distributed (5 min warm-up, 20 min exercise, 5 min cooldown), comprising exercises with different cadences low (L: 1 movement every 4 s), medium (M: 1 movement every 2 s), and high cadence (H: 1 movement per second); all with 30” of stimulus and 30” recovery using the following devices: elliptical, rower, surf/elliptical and leg press. Heart rate (HR), rate of perceived exertion (RPE), rate of perceived recovery (RPR), and feeling scale (FS) were evaluated before and immediately after the three sessions. The difference between moments was analyzed by analysis of variance with a significance level of p < 0.0001). Results: Cadence L (56 ± 2 %) showed lower values of relative HR than M (70 ± 5%) and H (85 ± 5%), which also differed from each other. Significant differences (p < 0.01) for the area under the curve of RPE (L: 75 ± 26, M: 115 ± 16, H: 154 ± 4) and RPR (L: 173 ± 16, M: 139 ± 12, H: 97 ± 6; UA) were identified among the cadences. Statistical differences (p < 0.01) were found on RPE 30 min of the session (L: 4.2 ± 0.7 < M: 5.7 ± 0.7 < H: 7.4 ± 0.5). Conclusion: The performance of different cadences induced different psychophysiological responses in older adults undergoing exercise sessions in the ATI. The moderate cadence provided an increase in HR with values considered safe for the exercise and therefore can be recommended for this population when using this equipment.
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