Brazilian Journal of Poultry Science, Volume: 7, Issue: 3, Published: 2005
  • Oil and fat in broiler nutrition

    Baião, NC; Lara, LJC

    Abstract in English:

    The terms "fat" and "oil" refer to triglycerides of several profiles of fatty acids. Fatty acids that are not bound to other organic components as glycerol are the so-called free fatty acids. Lipids constitute the main energetic source for animals and they have the highest caloric value among all the nutrients. Linoleic acid is the only fatty acid whose dietetic requirement has been demonstrated. Besides supplying energy, the addition of fat to animal diets improves the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, decreases pulverulence, increases diet palatability, and the efficiency of utilization of the consumed energy. Furthermore, it reduces the rate of food passage through the gastrointestinal tract, which allows a better absorption of all nutrients present in the diet. The energetic value of oils and fats depend on the following: the length of the carbonic chain, the number of double bonds, the presence or absence of ester bonds (triglycerides or free fatty acids), the specific arrangements of the saturated and unsaturated fatty acids on the glycerol backbone, the composition of the free fatty acid, the composition of the diet, the quantity and the type of the triglycerides supplemented in the diet, the intestinal flora, the sex and the age of the birds. In birds, body fat composition is similar to the composition of the fat from the diet. The apparent digestibility of unsaturated fats is high in the first days of life of birds, whereas apparent digestibility of saturated fats is low. The quantity of oils or fats is assessed by the following methods: titration, moisture, impurities, unsaponifiable, saponification value, percentage of fat, percentage of free fatty acids/acidity and the profile of fatty acids. The methods initial peroxide value, active oxygen method, osi, iodine value, and analysis of the thiobarbituric acid (TBARS) are specific to evaluate the oxidative stability. Considering diets with the same nutritive values, birds fed with rations containing oil present better performance than birds fed no oil. Moreover, the use of oil or fat in diets for broilers may change both the composition and the quality of the carcass.
  • Effect of free-choice feeding on the performance and ileal digestibility of nutrients in broilers

    Cruz, VC; Pezzato, AC; Pinheiro, DF; Gonçalves, JC; Sartori, JR

    Abstract in English:

    An experiment was conducted to study ileal digestibility of nutrients and to verify the ability of broilers to select feed in order to meet their requirements for protein and energy. The treatments consisted of six diets: R+S: free-choice feeding with rice bran (energy) and soybean meal (protein); C+G: free-choice feeding with corn (energy) and corn gluten meal (protein); R+G: free-choice feeding with rice bran (energy) and corn gluten meal (protein); C+S: free-choice feeding with corn (energy) and soybean meal (protein); R+C+G+S: free-choice feeding with rice bran and corn (energy) and corn gluten meal and soybean meal (protein); and BD: basal diet represented by a complete diet composed of 63% corn and 33% soybean meal. The results indicated that the adjustment to nutritional requirements does not depend only on the ability of birds to select feed. It might also depend on intake and ingredient quality, since some ingredients did not provide a balanced amount of nutrients. The birds were able to fulfill their requirements for maintenance, that is, they consumed the minimum amount of amino acids (g per day) for maximum growth. The free-choice group with corn gluten meal as the protein source had the worst performance, which indicated that this feed is not recommended as a primary source of amino acids for broilers. The C+G diet presented the highest digestibility coefficient of dry matter and crude protein, whereas the C+S diet resulted in the highest digestibility coefficient of ether extract and nitrogen-free extract, indicating that diet digestibility was affected by the type of feed used as energy and protein sources. In general, the high digestibility values indicate that broilers are able to efficiently digest and absorb the supplied feed.
  • Efficiency of prebiotics and probiotics on the performance, yield, meat quality and presence of Salmonella spp in carcasses of free-range broiler chickens

    Takahashi, SE; Mendes, AA; Saldanha, ESPB; Pizzolante, CC; Pelícia, K; Quinteiro, RR; Komiyama, CM; Garcia, RG; Almeida Paz, ICL

    Abstract in English:

    Two trials were carried out in the present study. Trial I evaluated the performance, carcass yield and breast meat quality, whereas Trial II evaluated the efficacy of utilizing prebiotics + probiotics on the control of Salmonella spp incidence in the carcasses of free-range broilers. In Trial I, 688 one-day-old male chicks of the Naked Neck Label Rouge strain were used, distributed in a randomized block design arranged according to a 2 x 2 factorial: control diet or diet supplemented with probiotics and prebiotics; and two rearing systems (confined or with access to paddocks - 3m²/bird), using four replicates with 35 birds each. The birds were reared until 84 days of age following the recommendations of management and nutrition for free-range strains, and had access to paddocks after 35 days of age. Water and food were given inside the experimental poultry house. Birds fed probiotics and prebiotics in the diet and the confined birds showed better performance, carcass yield and meat quality compared to the birds of the other treatments. In Trial II, 128 one-day-old male chicks of the free-range Naked Neck Label Rouge strain were used. The birds were distributed into four treatments: NCC (non-challenged control), NCS (non-challenged supplemented), CC (challenged control) and CS (challenged supplemented). There were no significant effects of adding probiotics and prebiotics in the diet in regard to Salmonella enteritidis recovery from the carcasses.
  • Methionine sources do not affect performance and carcass yield of broilers fed vegetable diets and aubmitted to cyclic heat stress

    Ribeiro, AML; Dahlke, F; Kessler, AM

    Abstract in English:

    The supplementation of vegetal diets with L-methionine (100% molar), methionine hydroxyl analogue (HMB) (88% molar) or DL-methionine (99% molar) was compared as to the performance of broilers allocated in cages and submitted to cyclic heat stress (CHS). The trial was carried out from 21 to 42 days of age. Two levels of synthetic methionine were supplemented for each methionine source (0.1 or 0.3 %), and the control treatment was not supplemented with synthetic methionine (negative control). Statistical analyses included the negative control treatment or were performed in a 3 x 2 factorial design (sources x levels). Addition of synthetic methionine to the basal level containing 0.63 % of total sulphur amino acids significantly improved feed conversion (FC) independent of the source. On the other hand, improvements in weight gain (WG) and body weight (BW) were more consistent comparing the negative control to HMB-supplemented treatments. Factorial analysis showed better FC for L-Met compared to DL-Met, whereas HMB showed intermediate results. The supplementation level of 0.3% methionine showed better FC than 0.1%. Methionine levels or sources had no effects on carcass, yields of cuts or feathering results. Therefore, results of DL-Met and HMB added to vegetal-based diets in comparable molar terms promoted similar performance in broilers under CHS conditions.
  • Response of broiler chickens to different dietary crude protein and feeding regimens

    Oyedeji, JO; Umaigba, JO; Okugbo, OT; Ekunwe, PA

    Abstract in English:

    Five isocaloric (3200kcal/kg) diets were used in an experiment designed to investigate the effects of dietary crude protein (CP) and feeding regimens on broiler performance. Day-old broilers were randomly distributed into four groups using a completely randomized design. Each group was replicated three times with ten broiler chicks per replicate. The experiment lasted for eight weeks. Broilers in group 1 received 23% CP from 0 to 3 weeks, 20% CP from 3 to 6 weeks and 18% CP from 6 to 8 weeks, while broilers in group 2 received 23% CP between 0 and 6 weeks and 18% CP between 6 and 8 weeks. Besides, broilers in group 3 were fed 23% CP from 0 to 4 weeks and 16% CP from 4 to 8 weeks, whereas group 4 was given 18% CP from 0 to weeks. Water was supplied ad libitum for broilers in the different dietary groups. A metabolic trial was carried out on the third week of the experiment using a total collection method. Proximate analyses of diets and faecal samples were performed according to the methods outlined by the Association Of the Official Analytical Chemists. Results at market age showed that broiler performance with respect to feed intake, weight gain, feed to gain ratio and water intake were not significantly influenced by CP regimens (p>0.05). Furthermore, CP regimens did not significantly influence broilers liveability (p>0.05). Protein retention, fat utilization and available fiber were not significantly influenced among treatments (p> 0.05). Economic data showed that cost to benefit ratio of producing broilers was comparable among broilers for all CP regimens used in this trial (p>0.05). It was concluded that a single diet of 18% CP and 3200kcal/kg metabolizable energy would be most suitable and convenient for farmers who are engaged in on-farm feed production for broilers as compared with the standard feeding regimens of broiler starter and broiler finisher diets.
  • Carcass and cut yields and meat qualitative traits of broilers fed diets containing probiotics and prebiotics

    Pelicano, ERL; Souza, PA; Souza, HBA; Oba, A; Boiago, MM; Zeola, NMBL; Scatolini, AM; Bertanha, VA; Lima, TMA

    Abstract in English:

    This study evaluated the use of different probiotics, prebiotics and symbiotics on the quality of carcasses and meat of broiler chickens. One hundred and eight day-old Cobb male broilers were used (n=108) in a completely randomized design according to a 3x3 factorial, with 3 probiotics in the diet (no probiotics, probiotics 1, probiotics 2) and 3 prebiotics in the diet (no prebiotics, prebiotics 1, prebiotics 2). There were nine treatments with 4 replicates and 3 birds per replicate. The results showed that the carcass and cut yields, color (L* - lightness, a* - redness, and b* - yellowness), pH, cooking losses, shearing force and sensory analysis were not affected by the use of different growth promoters at 42 days of age. It was concluded that growth promoters supplemented to the diet did not affect the studied quantitative and qualitative parameters of the carcass and breast meat of broiler chickens.
  • Commercial laying hen diets formulated according to different recommendations of total and digestible amino acids

    Casartelli, EM; Filardi, RS; Junqueira, OM; Laurentiz, AC; Assuena, V; Duarte, KF

    Abstract in English:

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate different commercial laying hen diets formulated based on recommendations for total and digestible amino acids. One hundred and twenty Lohmann LSL commercial laying hens aged 25 weeks were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design involving five replications of six birds in four treatments. Diet formulation on a total amino acid basis followed the recommendations of NRC (1994) and Rostagno et al. (2000), whereas formulation on digestible amino acids basis was according to Rostagno et al. (2000) and Degussa (1997) recommendations. The experimental period was divided into five periods of fourteen days. Performance parameters (egg production, feed intake, feed conversion, egg mass) were evaluated for each period, and on the last two days of each period, three eggs per replication were collected to evaluate egg quality parameters (Haugh unit, egg specific gravity, egg weight, eggshell thickness and percentage). Means were compared by orthogonal contrasts. Results on feed intake, egg production, egg mass, feed conversion and egg specific gravity showed that total amino acid recommendations promoted better bird responses than digestible amino acid recommendations.
  • Effect of associated vaccines on the interference between Newcastle disease virus and infectious bronchitis virus in broilers

    Cardoso, WM; Aguiar Filho, JLC; Romão, JM; Oliveira, WF; Salles, RPR; Teixeira, RSC; Sobral, MHR

    Abstract in English:

    The phenomenon of viral interference between live vaccines against Newcastle Disease and infectious bronchitis has been reported since the 50's and many researchers have reported its prejudicial effects on avian immunization. Therefore, this study evaluated the effect of associated vaccines on the interference between Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) in broilers. There were 400 broiler chicks divided into five groups. The groups were submitted to mono or polyvalent vaccinations against IBV and NDV, except for the non-vaccinated control group (CG). Sera were collected at 35 and 45 days of age and submitted to serologic tests to assess antibody levels. It was observed the occurrence of interference in the immune response against NDV by the use of associated vaccines to NDV and IBV; however, the group that was immunized with commercial combined vaccines (IBV+NDV) presented antibody titers to NDV similar to the group that was given only vaccine against NDV. We concluded based on these preliminary studies that the interference of IBV on the immune response against NDV depends also whether the association between the two vaccines is done just before vaccination or in the manufacturing laboratory.
  • Ingredient classification according to the digestible amino acid profile: an exploratory analysis

    Faria Filho, DE; Torres, KAA; Campos, DMB; Vieira, BS; Urbano, T; Rosa, PS; Ferraudo, AS

    Abstract in English:

    This study aimed: 1) to classify ingredients according to the digestible amino acid (AA) profile; 2) to determine ingredients with AA profile closer to the ideal for broiler chickens; and 3) to compare digestible AA profiles from simulated diets with the ideal protein profile. The digestible AA levels of 30 ingredients were compiled from the literature and presented as percentages of lysine according to the ideal protein concept. Cluster and principal component analyses (exploratory analyses) were used to compose and describe groups of ingredients according to AA profiles. Four ingredient groups were identified by cluster analysis, and the classification of the ingredients within each of these groups was obtained from a principal component analysis, showing 11 classes of ingredients with similar digestible AA profiles. The ingredients with AA profiles closer to the ideal protein were meat and bone meal 45, fish meal 60 and wheat germ meal, all of them constituting Class 1; the ingredients from the other classes gradually diverged from the ideal protein. Soybean meal, which is the main protein source for poultry, showed good AA balance since it was included in Class 3. On the contrary, corn, which is the main energy source in poultry diets, was classified in Class 8. Dietary AA profiles were improved when corn and/or soybean meal were partially or totally replaced in the simulations by ingredients with better AA balance.
  • Serovars of Salmonella spp isolated from broiler chickens and commercial breeders in diverse regions in Brazil from July 1997 to December 2004

    Kanashiro, AMI; Stoppa, GFZ; Cardoso, ALSP; Tessari, ENC; Castro, AGM

    Abstract in English:

    Avian salmonellosis is a worldwide problem to the poultry industry, from the point of view of animal health and public health as well. The aim of the present study was to survey the most common Salmonella serovars in commercial breeders or broiler flocks from several regions in Brazil. The results of the present study indicated a high incidence of S enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis in breeders (57.5%) and broilers flocks (84.0%). The importance of these findings lies in the fact that S. Enteritidis has become the most frequent serovar responsible for foodborne outbreaks and sporadic cases of salmonellosis in humans.
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